Gun Violence concentrated to a small number of US city Blocks

Burning Man

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There, there - you keep right on believing that and ignore everything else.

It'll make you feel better but that's all it will do.

100 years ago full auto firearms were available over the counter. How many mass murders of school kids by school kids occurred back then?

I'm sure the significance of that will escape you though.

Your culture is FUCKED. Guns make things easier if you want to commit mass murder but that's a problem separate to the desire to actually commit such atrocities. You need to address BOTH.

FKT
Thank you!! I've been saying that for years now!
 

Burning Man

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It couldn't have anything to do with guns being a rather common tool 100 years ago, with kids being raised to respect them, as opposed to today where they are an anomaly in most households (especially in urban areas), glorified by the media and video games, and/or the "forbidden fruit" aspect.

It MUST be the gun grabbers' fault! Or gangs.
Thank you for perfectly making the point I've been talking about here for a long time. Welcome aboard the sane train.
 

Burning Man

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this cuntry, especially, is fucking bloated, toxic and it never understood the plot, I don't even give a shit about it, not really. furthermore, if the quaint concept of 'country' ceased to exist tomorrow I'd consider it another dead formality.

but how do we address the fact that a beautiful planet is being rapidly killed by a single species...
I've said before that we need a lot less of the species altogether. If 6.9 billion of them went "poof" overnight, this would be a much betterer place.
 

Burning Man

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If gun violence was concentrated to a few city blocks, children at Sandy Hook, Parkland, and Uvalde wouldn't be dead. If gun violence was concentrated to a few city blocks, people in a shopping center in Buffalo would still be shopping.
People in churches, and synagogues, and concerts and festivals would all be alive and well.....
Oh FFS! Do you even know what the word "concentrated" means??? Last I checked, it didn't mean "ALL".
 
Thank you for perfectly making the point I've been talking about here for a long time. Welcome aboard the sane train.
Uh . . . same to you?

I'm not sure that our agreement on those points, 1) is exhaustive of all causes, nor 2) supports continuing access to ARs. In fact, I'm certain it doesn't.

In fact, I'm not sure that I've read much, if any, dissent on this point from the gun grabbing lefties here.
 

Burning Man

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Here's some more reporting on the OP topic. And by the way for you deliberately obtuse cunts....... when they say violence is concentrated to a few city blocks, they do not mean ALL of the US violence. They mean in a particular area like Shitcago - it's concentrated to a few small areas. Same in Baltimore or St Louis, etc.


View in browser|nytimes.com

July 8, 2022​
Today’s newsletter continues our occasional series on the causes of America’s unique problem with gun violence and the potential solutions. — David Leonhardt​
Good morning. We look at where most of America’s gun violence happens.​

Everyday violence​

Since a gunman killed seven people at a Chicago suburb’s July 4 parade, more than 160 people have died from other gun homicides across the country. In Chicago alone, at least 10 people were killed in multiple shootings during the holiday weekend.​
These everyday killings received far less attention than the mass murder at the parade. But they are the standard for American gun violence: More than 95 percent of gun homicides this year have been shootings with one to three victims.​
Today, we want to help you understand where and why most everyday gun violence happens. We’re going to focus on Chicago, because it has one of the country’s highest murder rates and because a local group — the University of Chicago Crime Lab — keeps detailed data. But the trends in Chicago are also present in many other places.​
One crucial point is that violence tends to be highly concentrated: A small sliver of blocks — just 4 percent in Chicago, for example — can account for a majority of shootings in a city or a county.​
Many of the people in these blocks live in terror. The sound of gunshots is common, sometimes coming multiple times a day. Parents worry that their kids could be next, and young people fear for their own lives. As Jomarria Vaughn, a 24-year-old Chicagoan, told this newsletter: “I’m scared. I have my guard up all day.”​
This map of shootings in Chicago shows the concentration. Shootings are rare in much of the city, particularly on the wealthier North Side, but not on the poorer West and South Sides.​
morning-chicago-shooting-map-articleLarge.png
Source: University of Chicago Crime Lab​
This concentration is not exclusive to Chicago. Across the U.S., neighborhoods that contained just 1.5 percent of the population accounted for 26 percent of gun homicides, a 2017 analysis by The Guardian found.​
Here is a look at four other cities, with data provided by the Princeton University researchers Alisabeth Marsteller and Patrick Sharkey:​
morning-chicago-other-cities-shootings-articleLarge-v2.png
Sources: Alisabeth Marsteller and Patrick Sharkey, Princeton University; Gun Violence Archive​

Poverty and violence​

There are several factors behind the concentration of violence. A major one is poverty.
In Chicago, violence and poverty closely overlap, as these maps demonstrate:​
morning-chicago-shooting-poverty-map-articleLarge.png
Poverty data from 2015 to 2019; grey regions are missing data. | Sources: University of Chicago Crime Lab; Chicago Health Atlas​
Experts have long debated why violence and poverty are linked. Is it something specific to poverty, such as insufficient housing or jobs? Is it the environment that poverty fosters, in which people are stressed and desperate — and more likely to act out?​
One theory, cited by Sharkey, blames the breakdown of “collective efficacy.” That might sound academic, but the concept is straightforward: When society’s institutions have unraveled, people feel that they are on their own. They are then less likely to watch over one another or come together to address common interests.
By reducing social trust, concentrated poverty hurts communities’ ability to enforce norms against violent behavior. And when people are left unchecked and feel they have nothing to lose, they are more likely to take extreme measures, such as violence, to solve their problems.
The past few years may help you understand this dynamic even if you’re not poor. Many Americans felt a hit to their own collective efficacy because of the Covid pandemic, George Floyd’s murder and its aftermath, and the polarized political atmosphere. Sure enough, murders and other violent crimes increased during this period.

A spiral downward​

It is difficult to talk about gun violence without talking about race, because Black Americans are most likely to be the victims of shootings. Poverty explains part of the disparity, since Black people are more likely to be poor. But individual poverty is not the full explanation.​
Black Americans are also less likely to live in communities with strong institutional support. Exclusionary housing policies and discrimination have pushed Black Americans into segregated neighborhoods. Both governments and the private sector then neglected these neighborhoods, leaving people without good schools, banks, grocery stores and institutions.​
This kind of economic neglect, which experts refer to as disinvestment, fosters violence. These maps show the correlation in Chicago between shootings and a lack of banks:​
morning-chicago-shooting-banks-articleLarge.png
“Many” represents at least a third of the population. | Sources: University of Chicago Crime Lab; Bank Branch Locator​
The relationship also goes the other way, Roseanna Ander, executive director of the Crime Lab, told us: Violence can perpetuate disinvestment. Business owners do not want their shops, restaurants and warehouses in violent neighborhoods. People do not want to live in places where gunshots are fired daily. And governments shift resources away from places that officials deem lost causes. It is a vicious cycle.​
A greater understanding of this spiral in recent years has driven activists and policymakers to address not just violence itself but its root causes, too. The Chicago mayor’s office told us it had adopted a broader approach to combating violence, focused on boosting businesses, local clubs, mental health care and other social supports, on top of traditional policing work. As this newsletter has explained before, most experts support an all-of-the-above strategy to crime, involving both the police and alternative approaches.​
But this work is difficult and, even if it succeeds, takes money and time — years or decades to rebuild long-neglected communities. Until then, the people in these neighborhoods will likely suffer the worst of American gun violence.​


This is exactly what I've been saying here for years. The root causes of this violence is poverty and societal breakdowns in those communities. But anyway, I thought this was a very well written and thought provoking article.
 

mikewof

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@mikewof begs to differ. He says we need more people to be able to afford to reverse climate change. No shit. You two ought to discuss these matters.

JBSF's regular promotion of killing off half the human race is not rooted in any kind of math or science, he is just a cantankerous bass-turd who don't like to share the highways with former Army, Coast Guard or anyone who has to work for a living.

And this has nothing to do with the gun thread, are you pulling a Normy?
 




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