Gunboat 80

Greenflash

Member
150
37
Apologies for the slow replies we've been doing a lot of sailing on 68-03 over here, in lieu of the Cannes Boat Show. For prospective clients it's been much more valuable than a show visit, of course we would have loved to show the boat to more people. Next year, I hope life is more back to normal! 

I'll answer some of the questions with a little info - forgive the cloak and dagger but this is early days and we're trying to be respectful to the owners with whom we are still working through some of the steps of the project. 

The renders are in.. I'm guessing there will be many tongues wagging about the steering position at the rear. Be interesting to see what is going on in the forward cockpit too. I think in the 68 they wanted the mast further back and have achieved it with the 80. 

https://www.gunboat.com/series/gunboat-80/
Ah ha! It's finally happening - aft helms on a Gunboat.  Here's the deal: We will do either only inside, only outside or both (Since we believe tiller steering won't be great on a boat this size). Many people love to be outside when the weather is nice. Many are happy for that the be the only spot, with a good nav station, throttles and pilot controls inside. 

We've still got a forward cockpit with centralized control of lines, while at a minimum the main sail controls will be at each helm+ nav - push button. This boat will likely go one step further with powered/automated controls, but that is entirely owner driven. Our ethos is to keep things simple and have backups for the majority of the functions. 

Not a fan of house stepped mast. Cannot get to it without going on the roof.

Come'on @Greenflash say it ain't so. 
Sorry mate, VPLP wanted to put the 68 rig on the roof and we felt it was too much of a step (excuse the pun!). We ended up moving it half a meter aft.

We are creating a giant salon on the 80, so the ratio really doesn't work well anymore, you would have a long boom and huge main that still has to be handled by 2-3 crew, so there is compelling reason to put it on the cabin top and create a little plinth for halyards in the cockpit. The aspect ratios are better, the "J" is much bigger allowing for a much bigger solent/jib/J2 on a self tacking track in front of the rig. Our forward cockpit has been completely redesigned to be as much of a lounging area as a working area.  Other than the usual sail ties for reefs, there is no reason to go to the roof as all the line handling and rope-holding is done at the cockpit level. 

It certainly is a big decision to make and one that we plan to integrate seamlessly to create a more balanced result. 

flybridge on a GB!
Ha ha - We call that the "fly lounge", it is to be used at anchor only - if it were to be used when sailing it would mean raising the boom higher, and that comes with performance compromises. You have the choice of a flat roof covered in solar, a fly lounge or my favorite: use the fly lounge volume to create a SUP/Kiteboard/Surfboard storage box, with a hard composite cover, that can be hinged up. This cover can be fully flush and covered in solar panels. 

Appreciate the feedback and support. More coming.

 

mpenman

Member
247
231
Pompano Beach
Sorry mate, VPLP wanted to put the 68 rig on the roof and we felt it was too much of a step (excuse the pun!). We ended up moving it half a meter aft.

We are creating a giant salon on the 80, so the ratio really doesn't work well anymore, you would have a long boom and huge main that still has to be handled by 2-3 crew, so there is compelling reason to put it on the cabin top and create a little plinth for halyards in the cockpit. The aspect ratios are better, the "J" is much bigger allowing for a much bigger solent/jib/J2 on a self tacking track in front of the rig. Our forward cockpit has been completely redesigned to be as much of a lounging area as a working area.  Other than the usual sail ties for reefs, there is no reason to go to the roof as all the line handling and rope-holding is done at the cockpit level. 
I figured that was the reason. You loose a fair bit of volume if you bring the forward cockpit aft.

Once again has nice lines and reminds me of the total open house found on the Catana 70. Very, very similar. 

I prefer solar over lounging, although I will admit, that's a nice spot for a nap!!!!!

Lovely lines, very lovely.

I'm psyched to see an eighty!!!!! Well done.

 

Tylo

Member
195
111
Sweden
much bigger solent/jib/J2 on a self tacking track in front of the rig
Does the track run just in front of the mast, on the roof, or in front of the forward cockpit, or somewhere else I haven't thought of?

Will it be sacrificing some sail area or will you be able to do some decksweeper wizardry with battens like they have on MACIF?

image.png

 

Ruminator

Member
329
158
Florida
^^ Nice one.

In looking at their (sub) contractor's website, it appears that they may not have an autoclave big enough for the hull sections.  Therefore, I wonder what the expected material characteristics are for a thermally cured prepeg hull are v. one that is autoclaved??

I do find it cool that they are 'batch processing' the first two hulls.  I wager this helps with controlling the costs and accelerates the learning curve for the build team.

 

HotCarNut

Member
57
16
Denver, CO
Hadn't picked up on that, wonder if they will bond the bits together?

Seems like Gunboat is doing well though with GB68 06 in build and sounds like the orderbook is filling up too. 

https://www.gunboat.com/gunboat-news-nov2021/
It seems like things are picking up, but realistically they’re averaging less than 2 68s a year.  I can’t believe the business model is built on that low a volume, but maybe it is with the dramatic increase in prices.  Only GLY knows for sure…

 

vokstar

Member
242
128
Tasmania
It seems like things are picking up, but realistically they’re averaging less than 2 68s a year.  I can’t believe the business model is built on that low a volume, but maybe it is with the dramatic increase in prices.  Only GLY knows for sure…
I wonder if supply chain probs haven't hindered production, I have a sneaky suspicion they might've up the price a bit from what they originally was thinking they could get for them. Been a bit of a surprise that none of the 68's have gone with an outrageous colour so far.. 

But back to the 80, I wonder if one of the two that are in production now will go with more radical board/foil setup as in one of the pics here 

https://au.yachtworld.com/yacht/2022-gunboat-80-7954708/

 

HotCarNut

Member
57
16
Denver, CO
I wonder if supply chain probs haven't hindered production, I have a sneaky suspicion they might've up the price a bit from what they originally was thinking they could get for them. Been a bit of a surprise that none of the 68's have gone with an outrageous colour so far.. 

But back to the 80, I wonder if one of the two that are in production now will go with more radical board/foil setup as in one of the pics here 

https://au.yachtworld.com/yacht/2022-gunboat-80-7954708/
It will be interesting to see, but I can’t imagine they’d do anything other than try to provide a small amount of lift with foils. I’m wondering if they’ll have two mast and rigging options like they do on the 68 - cruising and regatta.

 

loop

New member
45
6
farr out
I wonder if supply chain probs haven't hindered production, I have a sneaky suspicion they might've up the price a bit from what they originally was thinking they could get for them. Been a bit of a surprise that none of the 68's have gone with an outrageous colour so far.. 

But back to the 80, I wonder if one of the two that are in production now will go with more radical board/foil setup as in one of the pics here 

https://au.yachtworld.com/yacht/2022-gunboat-80-7954708/


Bridge clearance definitely opens totally new horizons :

grafik.png

 

Greenflash

Member
150
37
Bridge clearance definitely opens totally new horizons :
Sorry about that error. Our maximum displacement bridgedeck clearance is 1150mm. 

To answer some other questions: Hulls at Fibre Mechanics and Deck/Main bulkheads at Decision/Multiplast are all done prepreg corecell/nomex and vacuum, not autoclaved, but naturally the rig components and appendages (rudders boards) will be autoclaved. 

All composite components are trucked to Gunboat France for assembly and then yacht fitout. Even if we wanted to build prepreg cabability in house we are short of space, hence the outsourcing strategy. A good problem to have! Thank you for the interest and support! 

 

vokstar

Member
242
128
Tasmania
Ok it's a cool shot to get them side by side on the road, but how pissed would you be if you was in one of the cars behind the hulls. 




 

Sailabout

Super Anarchist
Sorry about that error. Our maximum displacement bridgedeck clearance is 1150mm. 

To answer some other questions: Hulls at Fibre Mechanics and Deck/Main bulkheads at Decision/Multiplast are all done prepreg corecell/nomex and vacuum, not autoclaved, but naturally the rig components and appendages (rudders boards) will be autoclaved. 

All composite components are trucked to Gunboat France for assembly and then yacht fitout. Even if we wanted to build prepreg cabability in house we are short of space, hence the outsourcing strategy. A good problem to have! Thank you for the interest and support! 
So its a bit Airbus with stuff from the UK?
I guess it all good news if you have the demand

 
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Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,685
5,635
Canada
Crossing the Atlantic (W to E) on a Gunboat 68. Most important take home - a boat that can sail at ~true wind speed in light winds is a dream. You get fast speeds and flat water.



On our boat we specifically looked for 10-12 knots for a passage. Good enough to easily average 6 knots of boat speed upwind or downwind and nice flat water. Friends with overloaded monos were looking for 15-20 knots to make their boats go!
 

HotCarNut

Member
57
16
Denver, CO
Crossing the Atlantic (W to E) on a Gunboat 68. Most important take home - a boat that can sail at ~true wind speed in light winds is a dream. You get fast speeds and flat water.



On our boat we specifically looked for 10-12 knots for a passage. Good enough to easily average 6 knots of boat speed upwind or downwind and nice flat water. Friends with overloaded monos were looking for 15-20 knots to make their boats go!

I think it’s going to be really fascinating with the 80 as the advertisement for it is sailing faster than the wind in anything over 5 knots of breeze. Passage making and sailing in light air will make it a great platform for entertaining, which is what a lot of these will probably spend their time doing.
 

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