Gunboat 80

jackolantern

Super Anarchist
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vokstar

Member
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207
Tasmania
8002 is going to be a sight to behold. watch this space.
Looking at some of the pics from the simulation, the curved boards are going to make things interesting indeed. I think they were an option on the 68, wonder why no one had them on the 68 but on the 80 they make sense.
 

eastern motors

Anarchist
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154
Looking at some of the pics from the simulation, the curved boards are going to make things interesting indeed. I think they were an option on the 68, wonder why no one had them on the 68 but on the 80 they make sense.
The guy buying the 80 usually races 110ft+ monos. He doesn't have a budget
 

vokstar

Member
331
207
Tasmania
The guy buying the 80 usually races 110ft+ monos. He doesn't have a budget
Not sure who the owner of GB8002 is, but it sounds like it is going to be doing ocean racing. The guy that usually races mono's has GB8001. From the link below "The first experience sailing Gunboat 68 Highland Fling – the Loro Piana Superyacht Regatta in June 2021 – exceeded expectations: They went all-in and commissioned the first Gunboat 80!" https://www.gunboat.com/brokerage/68highlandfling/
 

robalex117

Super Anarchist
Not sure who the owner of GB8002 is, but it sounds like it is going to be doing ocean racing. The guy that usually races mono's has GB8001. From the link below "The first experience sailing Gunboat 68 Highland Fling – the Loro Piana Superyacht Regatta in June 2021 – exceeded expectations: They went all-in and commissioned the first Gunboat 80!" https://www.gunboat.com/brokerage/68highlandfling/
Not so sure Ocean Racing these things is a good idea. As a former owner of a 60 and as that video of the 68 shows when it gets windy out there you start trying to slow down, not sure how that works out when you are racing. Inshore when you have all cruising equipment off and the boat is lightship it's about as good as it gets. Offshore not so much.

Loved doing the offshore passages with no pressure to keep the peddle down. Heck even inshore racing it was wack amole going around fixing things after windy days!!! See how it goes with this new batch of owners. Used to have a little circuit going between Newport and the Caribbean but it mostly died as far as I can see. Here is a picture of three 60's on the line right after a start. That's us to leward. Picture is from 2018.
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mpenman

Member
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Pompano Beach
Heck even inshore racing it was wack amole going around fixing things after windy days!!! See how it goes with this new batch of owners. Used to have a little circuit going between Newport and the Caribbean but it mostly died as far as I can see. Here is a picture of three 60's on the line right after a start. That's us to leward. Picture is from 2018.
Agreed. You have to keep things simple and strong.
Had 2 60's, 1 68, 2 66's at NSY before I left.

Wack amole comment had me laughing pretty good. What are you sailing now?
 

robalex117

Super Anarchist
Agreed. You have to keep things simple and strong.
Had 2 60's, 1 68, 2 66's at NSY before I left.

Wack amole comment had me laughing pretty good. What are you sailing now?
Sailing a sunfast 3300 right now. Boat in my profile picture. Doing a lot of short handed medium distance races. When we want a bigger boat right now we are just chartering although hard to find good options during the summer in New England. Although we are in the market for a power cat.
 
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loop

Member
69
21
farr out
Part 2 of their Atlantic crossing out on youtube - they broke a rudder halfway to the Azores:
Hope he'll cover some damage details and repairs as well

Part 3 is out now as well

Quote from the comments, regarding rudder damage:
Yes we knew we had hit something. Went went from 12 kts to nothing very quickly. We do know what we hit but as I'm sure you're aware we work professionally in the industry and although we can share a lot with you all on YouTube we can't share everything. Suffice to say the problem was sorted once we arrived in the Azores and a big shoutout to Gunboat who looked after logistics and ensured repairs went smoothly.

Very weird explanation – to keep some Gunboat design or build issues under wrap for their owner/employer, and keeping the myth of stratospheric quality (= market valuation) unscarred? Other ideas?

Also, he reports having freshwater flooding their bilges. Wasn’t that the issue, that took Tosca out of the game in the Atlantic race, and sent them to the Azores for repairs?

Anyone with an insight here?
 

Ravenswing

Member
80
108
I don’t think it’s very weird. Shayne seems to be trying hard to share his experience sailing, shipwrigting and rigging high end multihulls that most of us can’t touch. He has to walk the fine line between getting permission to film and share, vs. protecting owners’ privacy. For example, maybe this rudder situation is an active insurance claim and it’s really none of our business? He made all this pretty clear in the episode where he showed construction features of two carbon racing maxi monos. I was ok that he couldn’t reveal one of the boat names because in return we get to see the build structures inside, which sure wouldn’t have happened with me trying to snoop around a brokerage or regatta dock walk. I think we’re lucky to get a three-part series of detailed delivery footage. He’s got me wondering about when and how it gets practical to add load cell measurement to a 40’ performance cruiser…
 

loop

Member
69
21
farr out
It's a business model - they are making money off their influencer presence on the internet. Fair enough, and quite interesting at times, but certainly not doing the general sailing public an altruistic favor.
Asking for an explanation, or further details regarding information withheld, like from any other commercial presence on the internet, sounds nothing but fair to me ...
 

robalex117

Super Anarchist
Very weird explanation – to keep some Gunboat design or build issues under wrap for their owner/employer, and keeping the myth of stratospheric quality (= market valuation) unscarred? Other ideas?

Also, he reports having freshwater flooding their bilges. Wasn’t that the issue, that took Tosca out of the game in the Atlantic race, and sent them to the Azores for repairs?

Anyone with an insight here?
I have no first hand knowledge but I thought Tosca problem was water flooding in from the front doors. Has not happened to me offshore but inshore racing it has. Nothing catastrophic but we had a pile of towels ready just in case to mop up the water when a wave came and you had the door open. Sounds like their problem was a loose hose or some other fitting. Good news is Gunboats don't have super large water tanks so probably not that much water.

Regarding rudders and Gunboats I always carried a spare with me offshore and had another on standby at home. I would not call them disposable because we always rebuilt them but they were like magnets. Also my boat was a completely different build as far as quality and technical knowledge than these new ones from what I call the French Gunboats! Mine was built in China by Hudson. (Long story that has been hashed out before on the interweb but HH basically went to school on Gunboat and then when they thought they knew enough they said bye bye Gunboat and hello HH catamarans.)

So it is a fine line between having a rudder that is strong and one that is too strong and will break the boat if you hit something. Hard to describe but these are cassette type rudders that go into what you call a rudder bucket that is attached to the boat with two large round bearings. Sounds like on that video they broke both!!! Advantage of the rudder bucket and the cassette rudder is you can lift it up for shallow water or take it completely out.

Off topic but funny story. In Maine with the gizzilion lobster pots so get the idea to sail with only one rudder and at that time had a lifting skeg/prop. So now dodging lobster pots is a piece of cake with only one side to worry about. Gybeing down the Deer Island Thoroughfare and not once but twice did a gybe and could not stay down with just one rudder and rounded right up. Needless to say wife was not happy at our joey moves but honestly did not bother me that much and we just sailed on!!

 

mpenman

Member
289
315
Pompano Beach
I have no first hand knowledge but I thought Tosca problem was water flooding in from the front doors. Has not happened to me offshore but inshore racing it has. Nothing catastrophic but we had a pile of towels ready just in case to mop up the water when a wave came and you had the door open.
Does it flood if the door is closed. We'll get some water, but never enough to be even remotely concerned. Our forward bulkhead also has a forward facing lip. Never had a deluge, just spray, and that's pushing the boat hard.
Regarding rudders and Gunboats I always carried a spare with me offshore and had another on standby at home. I would not call them disposable because we always rebuilt them but they were like magnets. Also my boat was a completely different build as far as quality and technical knowledge than these new ones from what I call the French Gunboats! Mine was built in China by Hudson. (Long story that has been hashed out before on the interweb but HH basically went to school on Gunboat and then when they thought they knew enough they said bye bye Gunboat and hello HH catamarans.)
Indeed. Days of Phil Harvey, who I think was an excellent builder.
Off topic but funny story. In Maine with the gizzilion lobster pots so get the idea to sail with only one rudder and at that time had a lifting skeg/prop. So now dodging lobster pots is a piece of cake with only one side to worry about. Gybeing down the Deer Island Thoroughfare and not once but twice did a gybe and could not stay down with just one rudder and rounded right up. Needless to say wife was not happy at our joey moves but honestly did not bother me that much and we just sailed on!!

I for one would pay big money for that. Maine is simply un-sailable at times. Not sure whether it's catching lobsters or just feeding them in cages....
 

boardhead

Anarchist
I for one would pay big money for that. Maine is simply un-sailable at times. Not sure whether it's catching lobsters or just feeding them in cages....
I guess tilting centerboards and kick up rudders are the way to go if Maine waters are your preferred sailing area.

We snagged a pot - having dodged a gazillion - on Transient with a vertical board saling at mid/high teens and stopped pretty promptly.
Later inspection revealed a one inch deep rope burn where the cedar/glass board erupted out of the case. I had much better luck with an angled board on Skateaway - they always slipped off.
 


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