Hanse motorized rudder: do we like this idea?

Mr. Funky

Member
76
38
12 hours ago, Diarmuid said:


At the very spot, where the video was taken, my rudder failed as the bearing blocked it, so i couldn't push the tiller to starport as i tried to turn the boat around. 

...after some cursing and work with the throttle of the inboard and some disturbed looks from Mrs. Funky, the choosen direction was achieved, we proceeded to a berth and sortet the failure out.

No, Sir, you don't need that gadget, and if you have a really big boat, a bow thruster does it.

 

kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
27,267
5,174
Kent Island!
No we don't like this idea.

For a racer, too much drag.

For a cruiser too much complication and no range. The helm feel must suck under power too.

This is an old idea too, I have seen a tugboat with this setup but not for main propulsion,  more for extra rudder authority.

 
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ChrisJD

Member
255
172
Boston, MA
I wouldn't want it on my boat: terrible for longer-range cruising, plus all the maintenance issues people have already mentioned. But if I managed a SailTime fleet, I could see its appeal, in terms of maneuverability in tight quarters, a lot less expected day-to-day maintenance over the first five years or so of lifespan, and opening up space that would otherwise be taken by an engine on a small boat.

 
Fighting a huge ebb trying to get back in at 4 kts through the water, watching your battery life (and immediate prospects) going down the drain - oh wait, not a problem, just grab the 5 gallon jug of electricity and pour it in the deck fill fitting NOT 

Do these boats come standard with oars?

 

Panoramix

Super Anarchist
I like it, vector thrust, lighter, fewer hull openings, should be easier to dive on the prop to get crap off it.  Would like to know they won't charge like a wounded rhino if a seal leaks and drowns the motor, torqueedo have fucked their customers over this before, but maybe they have grown up now?
I would want one of it was mounted on a stern hung rudder that can be lifted up IMOCA / dinghy style.

Zero through holes plus easy to service motor.

 

socalrider

Super Anarchist
1,390
749
San Diego CA
Fighting a huge ebb trying to get back in at 4 kts through the water, watching your battery life (and immediate prospects) going down the drain - oh wait, not a problem, just grab the 5 gallon jug of electricity and pour it in the deck fill fitting NOT 

Do these boats come standard with oars?
Let's not replicate the dozens of arguments about electric propulsion here.  As concluded elsewhere, obviously there are drawbacks, but for many, a somewhat limited range is not a big deal on a sailing vessel.  For those of you who routinely motor into 4kt tidal currents for hours on end, rest assured diesel engines will still be available for you.  

Please focus your vitriol on the specific solution Hanse has developed.  I for one think it's interesting, assuming the rudder system is properly engineered for the weird loads that would result.  Vectored thrust is a good thing & this solution provides that with almost zero added complexity.  

 

mckenzie.keith

Aspiring Anarchist
712
211
Santa Cruz
I would want one of it was mounted on a stern hung rudder that can be lifted up IMOCA / dinghy style.

Zero through holes plus easy to service motor.
There would have to be some wires connected to the rudder to run the motor. I mean, that is true either way. But with the rudder hanging on the transom, the wires would be more exposed to the elements and potential for mechanical damage. And for the rudder to be easily liftable, I think you would need some kind of connector on the wires so you could disconnect, then lift. Not saying this is insurmountable. Just a wrinkle in the idea.

 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,821
1,154
San Diego
Hard to really tell from the graphic, but prop is not very far underwater. A nice steep chop will have that system making quite a froth on the surface.

 

Dogscout

Member
318
258
On walkabout
Is it just me or has anyone else come to the decision that this is actually a great idea as a stern thruster and not as a propulsion engine?  I enjoy my bow thruster when maneuvering in the harbor and tying up at the stern.  This little pod would make a decent stern thruster that you could point while backing in.  

 

Jackett

Member
137
76
UK
There would have to be some wires connected to the rudder to run the motor. I mean, that is true either way. But with the rudder hanging on the transom, the wires would be more exposed to the elements and potential for mechanical damage. And for the rudder to be easily liftable, I think you would need some kind of connector on the wires so you could disconnect, then lift. Not saying this is insurmountable. Just a wrinkle in the idea.
Not really an issue with modern flexible armoured cables. Your car does and probably boot lid have power and control cables running into them. Opened multiple times a day, in all sorts of weather conditions, yet problems are rare. 

 




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