Hard dinks, nesting dinks, and why we like them

Jim in Halifax

Super Anarchist
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I'll bet she is quick, with that light, narrow, easily-driven hull. That she has only a 27 HP auxiliary is a clue. CF rig too. That is what we would have called a 'sleeper' back in the heyday of muscle cars...

 

Rasputin22

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It could be worse, when I first saw the title of this thread, I thought it said,

HARD TWINKS and why we love them!

    When I realized what it really said I thought it was pretty funny until I Googled that phrase... Don't you dare!

    I really must go see an optometrist. 

 

Rasputin22

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dyslexics-of-the-world-unite-the-dyslexic-support-group-ran-10653593.png


 
Note: none of this applies to the Walker Bay 8' boat, which is good at almost nothing. 
6hp on the back of a WB8 will get you 12+ knots. You need an extra long tiller extension, and to be positioned far enough forward that looking down and back you see the bow wave, while steering with a foot.

Note: the hull deforms at this speed and becomes concave forward of the transom, which is likewise deforming from the torque of too-many HP's, so I think this may be an upper limit. :D

 

TwoLegged

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6hp on the back of a WB8 will get you 12+ knots. You need an extra long tiller extension, and to be positioned far enough forward that looking down and back you see the bow wave, while steering with a foot.

Note: the hull deforms at this speed and becomes concave forward of the transom, which is likewise deforming from the torque of too-many HP's, so I think this may be an upper limit. :D
Can we assume that you are in no way foolish enough to overpower a boat in such a dangerous way, and that this detailed info was learnt from an irresponsible friend?  ;)  

 
Can we assume that you are in no way foolish enough to overpower a boat in such a dangerous way, and that this detailed info was learnt from an irresponsible friend?  ;)  
The experiment was conducted under the auspices of DARPA*, and complete safety and health measures** were undertaken during the live phases on the water.

.

.

*Dinghy Advanced Research, Propulsion Alternatives.
** Beers.

 

TwoLegged

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@CapnK, you have the basis there of ISO 9000 accreditation.   You just need to demonstrate that DARPA's elf in safe tea procedures are fully documented, and that you have systems in place to ensure that the procedures are followed consistently.

 
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MFH125

Member
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166
Does anyone else think Leo's old dinghy looks a lot like the Hydrolite dinghy?

323 lines plan.jpg 323 photo1.jpg 323 photo2.jpg 323 photo3.jpg 323 photo4.jpg 323 sail & const plan.jpg

The rig is a bit different and there's a foredeck which isn't seen in the other pictures, but a lot of other details seem about right. 

At any rate, the Hydrolite dinghy is an interesting boat. According to the old S&S blog: the drawings were done by S&S and 8 boats were built in 1940 by George Barnes of Skaneatles Boatworks who had formulated a new glue for laminated wood construction.  They were built out of mahogany using an autoclave.  Apparently his glue was later sold to the US Navy and used for building PT boats during the war.  That bares some resemblance to Leo's lore about the boat being a test case for a new glue.  Maybe the Spruce Goose was built using the same laminating techniques.

The boat in the pictures doesn't match the drawings.  The rounded transom corners on the linesplan were omitted.  The photos also show no CB trunk or rudder fittings, but perhaps some of the boats were built with those and some without.

LOA 8'0" and beam 3'11".  Cool and unusual little boat.

 




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