Hardener question

kgs113

Member
134
15
I'm almost through laminating a new mast beam to replace the old plywood beam. Using resawed white oak and african mahogany. I having been using one coating of 205206 neat then same mix with 403 and mahog flour for color. I don't have enough 206 hardener to finish the job but I have fresh 209 and 207 for a spring project New ply deck on my Cal 25. Basement temp is 52-58 degrees. The slow hardener is curing without a problem. I'm concerned with using the extra slow because of its minimum recommended cure temp-70 deg. I have enough 207 hardener to get the job done. How well will that work with the fillers and cure? I don't really want to get another can of slow at this point.

 

eliboat

Super Anarchist
2,237
621
It will go eventually, just much longer and not really reach full properties until it sees the 70 deg or so. Trying in 50 deg will not ruin the mix, it will just retard the cure.

 

ScowVegas

Reporters
4,417
7
Chicago
First of all 207 and 209 are a 3:1 by volume mix - use the right pumps when using that hardener.

Next at 50 F 209 will not cure - 207 will cure very slooooooooow - but 207, while a great structural epoxy, is formulated for clarity and the extra dime you shelled out would be best spent for top coating.

+2 on getting some more 205 or 206 (hell get 'em both!)

;)

 

kgs113

Member
134
15
Appreciate the opinions. The kicker is I only need 13 pumps of mix to finish the job that's why I was going to go to the 207. I've got time for it to cure. about 3 months.

 

eliboat

Super Anarchist
2,237
621
If I have 3 months to let it cure, I would just go with it. I've used higher temp epoxies in the same situation and been fine.

 
I just stuck my nose in another epoxy type thread, so...I've been dismasted twice, and have made spars seemingly forever..Oak is one of those woods that sometimes doesn't like epoxy. Plus, spars and masts have a great deal of flex, so elasticity is a big issue. West's new G-Flex is what I've changed to in my spar repairs. We've done double clothespin scarf joints in the middle of nowhere, and this one to one flexible epoxy is hard to beat so far in our at sea tests.

 




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