Home shop CNC Anarchy

LionessRacing

Super Anarchist
4,364
598
Myrtle Beach,
Looking at making some repetitive panels that would be ideal for a CNC router. some type of a "foldable" table top tool that could be used as needed and not take up floor space otherwise.

What's the current optimum size/price for "homeowner/hobby" use? I've seen the "Shark" at 12x12" and $1k plus the router... 

what else is out there that you'd recommend? 

 

valis

Super Anarchist
3,782
611
Friday Harbor, WA
I recently got a Shapeoko, which seems pretty nice.  It doesn't fold up though.  I got the "XL" version, but the smaller version isn't too big and has a cutting area of 16" x 16".

I got the Z-Plus option (leadscrew Z-axis rather than belt, I think it's standard now), and the "Carbide Compact" router, which is a Makita clone).

I'm still learning how to cut aluminum without clogging the bits, but that's my fault, not the machine's.

 
Looking at making some repetitive panels that would be ideal for a CNC router. some type of a "foldable" table top tool that could be used as needed and not take up floor space otherwise.

What's the current optimum size/price for "homeowner/hobby" use? I've seen the "Shark" at 12x12" and $1k plus the router... 

what else is out there that you'd recommend? 
Sub it out.  For $1000, plus learning how to run the thing, I could cut you 30, 4x8 sheets of parts.

You're looking to do like a mft top?




 

Wet Spreaders

Super Anarchist
2,511
300
SF Bay
I built an MPCNC. Not the most accurate CNC solution, but great for large panels. I made these voronoi pattern shelves, for example.

IMG_0551.jpg

 

Wet Spreaders

Super Anarchist
2,511
300
SF Bay
The good thing about MPCNC is it's cheap if you have access to a 3D printer. Also, you can make different tool holders. I have one for the 500W DC spindle in the photo, but also one for a DeWalt router - which chucks out more power, and more noise. I also have a drag knife for cutting paint stencils and vinyl.

You can make it any size you like - just make the tubes longer. You obviously sacrifice Z accuracy as size goes up, but if you're cutting through wood, who cares?

 

peragrin

Super Anarchist
1,832
86
WD40.

When I was porting cylinder heads with carbide burrs, keeping them wet with WD40 kept the cutter clear.

Just keep a spritzer of it on hand.
Do not use wd-40 anywhere in the same building as where you paint stain or sand things.

The wd-40 will corrupt your finishes.  Once had a guy spray door hinges with wd-40 while cleaning shop off hours.  He then spent $20,000 redoing an expensive conference room table.  That stuff gets everywhere.  

 

Fah Kiew Tu

Curmudgeon, First Rank
10,432
3,508
Tasmania, Australia
I'm still learning how to cut aluminum without clogging the bits, but that's my fault, not the machine's.
Odourless kerosene is what I use for machining aluminium. WD40 works too but it's more expensive.

Yes aluminium is quite gummy especially the softer grades. Picking it out of the flutes gets old. So does breaking carbide cutters if you don't.

FKT

 

LionessRacing

Super Anarchist
4,364
598
Myrtle Beach,
having them made is a default, but since it was more of an experiment, was planning an iterative design, test sequence on acoustic scatter plates somethng like this 
iu


 
Last edited by a moderator:
having them made is a default, but since it was more of an experiment, was planning an iterative design, test sequence on acoustic scatter plates somethng like this 
Welp, right off the bat, you're going to want to do that where you cut each pocket to depth at the same.  Take the same amount of each until you get to desired depth.  Anywhere you've got a thin piece of material two operations will get kinda tricky.

 
My kid has been getting into the home CNC thing. First he made a little drawing robot.



Next up was the 3D printed CNC Dremel. In this video we are making a replacement switch box for the airplane. The PLA 3D printed box warped in the heat.


This is the 3D printed switch box in action. The display is an orphan and one of the buttons died.


Edit: We also used this machine to make cam cleat mounts to upgrade the jib traveler on our '78 H16. Here is a picture of the jib traveler cleat. It was machined to match the airfoil profile of the front beam. There are hex pockets to accept locknuts to screw in a stock Hobie swivel cleat.
jib cleat 2.jpg

Then we found a cheap Fireball CNC router.
 
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