How do these Sacrificial Anodes look to you?

So, weird thumping noise when I ran the prop was easily diagnosed by sticking my head in the water. One of the zincs had come loose and worked its way up until it was just tapping the hull when it turned. So, I took it off and now that it is out of the water I'm trying to decide how I feel about them before replacing them.

I am in freshwater on Lake Washington.

How do these look to the more salty amongst you? 

IMG_0553.jpg

IMG_0555.jpg

 
I am replacing them with Magnesium anodes (these are zinc), but I would like to know just "how bad" do these look to folks. Like is the corrosion on the shaft side expected, or a sign that it was not making sufficient contact? Is the surface pitting indicative of anything? What about the brownish mineral like build up, expected? Normal?

 

See Level

Working to overcome my inner peace
It looks pretty normal for a zinc anode in fresh water. No it wasn't tight enough.

When you put the new one on tighten the fasteners, then smack the anode on each side with a hammer (not to hard) to make it set on the shaft. Then tighten the fasteners again.

 

ryley

Super Anarchist
5,516
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Boston, MA
they look like zinc anodes in fresh water, not the right tool for the job. Glad to hear you're putting mags on instead. the coating you see is the reason you don't use zinc in fw.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,743
12,384
Great Wet North
It looks pretty normal for a zinc anode in fresh water. No it wasn't tight enough.

When you put the new one on tighten the fasteners, then smack the anode on each side with a hammer (not to hard) to make it set on the shaft. Then tighten the fasteners again.
To clarify - hold one (big) hammer against the zinc to act as an anvil and hit the other side with a not so big hammer.

Snug up the fasteners, reverse the hammers and do it again.

The zincs in the OP look like they've been doing their job.

 
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