How do you store your tools onboarding? ?

ordkhntr

Member
332
21
Oregon
I'm re-organizing our cavernous lazzerette, adding dividers  and storage boxes/options. Right now it's just one giant cave and everything get tangled and slides around. I've build/improved storage for fenders, fuel tank, and anchor so far and am going to tackle tools and spare parts next. Granted I don't carry too much in the way of parts on a 26' boat that sails the Columbia River, but I'd like it organized none the less.

How do you store things and protect them from moisture? I'm thinking a cloth tool roll inside a pelican like case and a moisture absorber pack? 

Thanks 

 

IStream

Super Anarchist
10,854
3,037
If you keep lines in the lazarette, put a bunch of hooks/hangers in place to keep them from tangling up in everything.

As for the tools, a Pelican case will definitely get the job done. I'm not a fan of canvas tool rolls on a boat because they can absorb moisture and cause rust but if you soak them in melted paraffin they work great. I also like to spray steel things down with WD-40 before they go into storage. WD gets a bad reputation because people like to use it as a (shitty) lubricant but keeping water off metal is literally what it was designed for. 

 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,256
993
The Gorge
I'm still battling with this.  I like tools to be instantly accessible and have designated cocoons/hooks/pockets.  I want to be able to instantly reach for the one I want and see at a glance if something is missing.  In a spacious workshop, drawers and pegboards fill the need.  On a small boat with odd-shaped spaces, it's more difficult.

In the beginning, I had one of those blow-molded toolboxes with a cheap all-purpose tool set on the boat.  It was an inefficient use of space and wouldn't fit anywhere except on top of a settee.  Then I went to tool rolls, which I absolutely loathe.  To get out one tool, you have to get out ALL of the tools.  They take up all of the space on the boat when rolled out, and stuff falls out of them.  My current project is like tool rolls at first glance, but they don't roll.  They will hang on the wall above my workbench, and on the inside of locker doors.  Not big enough for every tool on board, but will hold the most-frequently-used set.  In the lazarette, such a thing might be affixed to the wall with something like Weld-Mount tabs.  

Rust protection - keep everything lubricated and spray down with corrosion inhibitor like Boeshield or CRC Corrosion Inhibitor.  

 

steele

Super Anarchist
1,726
228
Land of the locks
I like this one, Milwaukee 13" jobsite box. The form factor works well for lazarette. The lid is near waterproof, and it keeps things organized.

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El Borracho

Verified User
6,659
2,635
Pacific Rim
I wouldn't be so sure an airtight case is the best for steel tools. Close it on a damp morning and you've trapped a teaspoon of water in there to create havoc for a few weeks or months. Keep my steel tools in a nylon fabric zippered tool bag. Spray in rust protector every so often, not WD-40 which just evaporates, but the stuff that dries to a waxy goo (or like @toddsterabove).

Best to not carry much. They are heavy and realistically what are you going to repair underway?

As for fenders: mine roll around in the most useless deepest inaccessible lazarette on the boat. But their painter is secured just inside the hatch so they can be retrieved.

All the lines must be properly coiled and hung in an orderly way or you are not a sailor.

 

Elegua

Generalissimo

Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,641
5,607
Canada
I probably carried 300 lbs of tools on our boat for 8 years living aboard. But the "ready use" toolbox contained stuff that was used for 80% of onboard jobs. Just a basic sturdy plastic toolbox, not too big and heavy. Occasionally sprayed with WD40. What lived in it?

Top tray:

A Pic-quick multibit screwdriver, few mini slotted screwdrivers, scratch Awl, used dental picks, Sailmakers needles, used toothbrush, needle nose pliers, regular pliers, needle nose vice grips, diagonal cutters, utility knife, Allen key sets

Bottom compartment

Metric combination wrenches (engines), inch combo wrenches (boat fasteners), 2 lb ball peen hammer, adjustable wrench, vice grips, hacksaw and blades, 1 chisel, pin and taper punches. 

The socket set and electrical tool box were close by too. They were next most used.

Rust was only a problem if the tools were used in salt water. Even after rinsing and spraying with WD 40, they still seemed to show some surface rust a week later. Probably gets in little tiny pits in the metal and isn't easily removed.

 
I use a synthetic canvas tool roll, and periodically clean the tools with wd40 or PB Blaster, then oil them with 30 weight. I like that it rolls up small, and lies flat where the tools are easy to see.. I have a small plastic tackle box for fasterners, and miscellaneous small tools like jeweler's screwdrivers, allen key wrench sets, sailrepair aw;. electrical tape, etc. - this stays down below in a dry bin, along with the egg beater drill, hacksaw, and yaesu (Japanese) pull saw. I wouldn't keep tools in a cockpit locker where they will get wet and buried under crap.

 

ghost37

Member
184
34
Boston
We probably have a dozen small/medium steralite plastic bins, all labeled to indicate the tools, supplies, or spares that are inside. Easiest to pull out the specific bin(s) you need for the job than a bulkier toolbox or something. 

 

mcpusc

New member
37
15
PNW, USA
i use zippered canvas bags, four or five of them now, stored in a dry cabinet inboard. everything got a light spray of boeshield & a wipedown with a rag when it first came onto the boat, and i give them additional sprays every few times i use them. it does make the tools a bit oily, but it takes only a moment to wipe it off before use and I've had no problem with rust.

 

Varan

Super Anarchist
6,624
1,789
Fresh h2o lake, relatively dry environment, but still, my solution is to buy cheap ass tools and replace them regularly. Big bucks for stainless just did not work.

 

Bull City

A fine fellow
7,050
2,666
North Carolina
I'm still battling with this.  I like tools to be instantly accessible and have designated cocoons/hooks/pockets.  I want to be able to instantly reach for the one I want and see at a glance if something is missing.  In a spacious workshop, drawers and pegboards fill the need.  On a small boat with odd-shaped spaces, it's more difficult.

In the beginning, I had one of those blow-molded toolboxes with a cheap all-purpose tool set on the boat.  It was an inefficient use of space and wouldn't fit anywhere except on top of a settee.  Then I went to tool rolls, which I absolutely loathe.  To get out one tool, you have to get out ALL of the tools.  They take up all of the space on the boat when rolled out, and stuff falls out of them.  My current project is like tool rolls at first glance, but they don't roll.  They will hang on the wall above my workbench, and on the inside of locker doors.  Not big enough for every tool on board, but will hold the most-frequently-used set.  In the lazarette, such a thing might be affixed to the wall with something like Weld-Mount tabs.  

Rust protection - keep everything lubricated and spray down with corrosion inhibitor like Boeshield or CRC Corrosion Inhibitor.  
Todd, thank you for mentioning Weld-Mount. I can use something like this. I must be living under a rock.

B.C.

 

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
I probably carried 300 lbs of tools on our boat for 8 years living aboard. But the "ready use" toolbox contained stuff that was used for 80% of onboard jobs. Just a basic sturdy plastic toolbox, not too big and heavy. Occasionally sprayed with WD40. What lived in it?

Top tray:

A Pic-quick multibit screwdriver, few mini slotted screwdrivers, scratch Awl, used dental picks, Sailmakers needles, used toothbrush, needle nose pliers, regular pliers, needle nose vice grips, diagonal cutters, utility knife, Allen key sets

Bottom compartment

Metric combination wrenches (engines), inch combo wrenches (boat fasteners), 2 lb ball peen hammer, adjustable wrench, vice grips, hacksaw and blades, 1 chisel, pin and taper punches. 

The socket set and electrical tool box were close by too. They were next most used.

Rust was only a problem if the tools were used in salt water. Even after rinsing and spraying with WD 40, they still seemed to show some surface rust a week later. Probably gets in little tiny pits in the metal and isn't easily removed.
+1  on the used dental picks -  use them all the time and if they break,  just grab another,  I have a dentist who give me lots....  

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,641
5,607
Canada
Epoxy does not bond well to the stainless studs
Me, my impact gun, and my blowtorch want to have a word with them. Previous owner of our last boat used epoxy to bond in the winch mounting bolts and the chainplates. Took HOURS to get them out. The epoxy bonded very, very well to stainless bolts. What's special about Weld Mount s.s.?

Seriously, West System folks have been using epoxy to bond s.s. fasteners and testing them.

 

MFH125

Member
164
166
If you have the money, the solution to rust and seizing is to get some beryllium bronze tools. 

A friend of mine found a pair of pliers made of the stuff while diving for a lost anchor.  The anchor had been accidentally dropped off the side of a dock while transferring it to the boat without a rode.  While down there he found lots of other goodies that had been dropped over time including the pliers.  When recovered they worked just fine.  A little advertising at the club turned up the owner who had lost them either 4 or 5 years previously.

While they don't float, they are essentially corrosion free, non-magnetic, and non-sparking (which is why they exist in the first place, they're used a lot in the oil-and-gas industry).  They are expensive, though, but if you keep an eye on ebay you can get some good deals on used tools.

Not for use on metal boats, obviously.

 
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thinwater

Super Anarchist
1,041
133
Deale, MD
Me, my impact gun, and my blowtorch want to have a word with them. Previous owner of our last boat used epoxy to bond in the winch mounting bolts and the chainplates. Took HOURS to get them out. The epoxy bonded very, very well to stainless bolts. What's special about Weld Mount s.s.?

Seriously, West System folks have been using epoxy to bond s.s. fasteners and testing them.
Bolts have threads. Weld Mount studs are smooth on the bond surface. Big difference.

Duckworks makes studs with holes drilled all through them; they work well with epoxy. You could drill holes in the Weld Mount studs.

Duck Works studs

Buy studs

 
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