How to Keep Tools From Rusting Onboard?

I just use break-free CLP.  For regular tools, I give them a quick wipe down after use (sometimes) and toss the rag back in the toolbag along with the tools.
 

For drill bits, oscillator blades, etc. I have become fond of the 'lock & lock' brand of kitchen containers.  They fasten very sturdily, seem to be resistant to CLP (a few years of testing) and are absolutely air tight.  Useful for smaller electronics type items too - although obviously don't spray a bunch of CLP in the box with those!

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
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Punta Gorda FL
Yeah, it's the "getting water off things" that keeps them from rusting. Nobody's arguing that WD is a good lubricant but it's excellent for keeping rust off tools. LPS3 and Boeshield are great too, but I don't like a waxy coating on my hand tools. I use those products for long-term rust protection on stationary stuff like motors.
WD40 doesn't leave much behind when it evaporates because it was designed not to. That does make it a cleaner option than my approach.

Because I only play with small boats these days, tools in the box are only used when necessary. Otherwise, they're stationary objects that never get touched. If I have to touch one, I get glom on my hands. Oh well. WD gets it off and one of the little spray cans lives in the tool box.

I don't do this to my regular tools. Those get a light coat of oil because the air is full of salt here. Interesting point above about two stroke oil. It is made to stick better but I've never used it on tools. Maybe I'll start.

 

Captain Ketamine

Anarchist
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Perth WA
Use whatever oily shit you have to hand, be that sump oil, wd 40, ballistol, Kerro, grease, whatever. Probably not KY Jelly. Wrap it up in a “tool wrap” if you want or plastic bag. You’ll have to wipe it off after. Nothing is fool proof. I seem to recall  an a approach that retreating armies would do to protect firearms they would bury on the off chance that on return they would be able recover workable armaments. Grease +++ wrapped in grease proof paper was one (WW1 /2). I’d be interested to hear/ read what current forces would suggest.

 

Captain Ketamine

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Perth WA
Having said that. I use Ballistol mainly to clean the outside of firearms. ( black powder flintlock and percussion cap stuff). But I still tend to use WD40 for the lock and moving parts.

If you are going down the line of “Last Tango In Paris” and are reaching for the butter it might not be a good long term choice as it will go rancid. 

I wonder about a lot of modern lubricants and whether the additives to a petroleum/ synthetic base can be used on everything or really only a limited role.

there always seems to be another expensive wonder spray around the corner. Not alot of independent comparison.

all the best with your corroding implements…

 

axolotl

Super Anarchist
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San Diego
 I seem to recall  an a approach that retreating armies would do to protect firearms they would bury on the off chance that on return they would be able recover workable armaments. Grease +++ wrapped in grease proof paper was one (WW1 /2). I’d be interested to hear/ read what current forces would suggest.
Cosmoline.  Been around since the 1870s but recently the military has switched to PET film wraps, easier to clean up.

 

axolotl

Super Anarchist
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San Diego
Really this is a problem?  I've got tools over 50 years old mostly with no rust or a minor rust sheen kept in a plastic sealed ammo box and have never oiled/treated them with stuff.  My shoreside tools in an old craftsman metal toolbox have fared well also.  Could be the San Diego weather plays a role, as it's the go to antique car buyer's mecca due to no rust damage.

 
Being near salt water, and ensuring that tools are reasonably readily available makes a difference.  Bolt cutters - yes, smeared in grease and reasonably close if they are ever needed.  Day-to-day tools, and or once a week or once a month tools, different deal.  Once again - regular old CLP and keeping a light coat on even if you want to grab a paper towel again before using them is cheap and just works.  As others have noted above - any kind of oily lubricant will work just fine.  WD-40 is great to get water off, not so great for protection.  I just like the CLP just 'cuz', not a specific recommendation.

 




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