Hybrid German mainsheet system?

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
Also, add a safety strop around the boom.  It's possible to rip the block off during an uncontrolled gybe although that loop looks pretty robust.
If you have a loose footed main,  you can put a strop right around the boom for your blocks to hang on....  just reduces some metal and clutter.  

 

dmydlack

New member
3
0
Baltimore
German-style sheeting with boom-mounted tackle???

German-style sheeting with boom-mounted tackle???
Would anyone know of a similar example of a mainsheet tackle/rigging system (see drawing below)? I'm especially interested in finding a 'track- sliding' mount for a set of tackle-pulleys.

Here's my rationale for this setup: I have built a targa bar topped with a traveler. I'd prefer not to rig the mainsheet tackle between the traveler car and the boom. The distance will be short (and I sort of don't like all that hardware swinging about when loose overhead in the cockpit area.)

So, I'm thinking about running the mainsheet forward along the boom, down the mast, and back to a clutch - like German style sheeting. My idea is to mount the 6:1 tackle between the boom and the mast. One set of pulleys would 'slide' along a track (to enable the proper mechanical advantage) while the other would be fixed (either to the mast or the boom.)
The reason for mounting the tackle to the boom is to remove it from inbetween the traveler car and the boom, in fact, out of the cockpit area, forward to the area of the boom above the poptop (away from heads.)

Thanks in advance for your thoughts!

Danny in Baltimore

305572710_971858527544040_800514725141241086_n.jpg


305748045_971858534210706_3723228364049833093_n.jpg
 

10thTonner

Hazard to Navigation
1,623
582
South of Spandau
German-style sheeting with boom-mounted tackle???

German-style sheeting with boom-mounted tackle???
Would anyone know of a similar example of a mainsheet tackle/rigging system (see drawing below)? I'm especially interested in finding a 'track- sliding' mount for a set of tackle-pulleys.

Here's my rationale for this setup: I have built a targa bar topped with a traveler. I'd prefer not to rig the mainsheet tackle between the traveler car and the boom. The distance will be short (and I sort of don't like all that hardware swinging about when loose overhead in the cockpit area.)

So, I'm thinking about running the mainsheet forward along the boom, down the mast, and back to a clutch - like German style sheeting. My idea is to mount the 6:1 tackle between the boom and the mast. One set of pulleys would 'slide' along a track (to enable the proper mechanical advantage) while the other would be fixed (either to the mast or the boom.)
The reason for mounting the tackle to the boom is to remove it from inbetween the traveler car and the boom, in fact, out of the cockpit area, forward to the area of the boom above the poptop (away from heads.)

Thanks in advance for your thoughts!

Danny in Baltimore

View attachment 539381

View attachment 539382

I don’t know how much mainsail you are going to put on top of that but are you sure this bar wouldn’t bend or break in a sporty gybe?
 

claudiajohnston

New member
27
5
I have a German mainsheet system whose general layout you can see here. Although it may not be clear from the picture, the sheet terminates on the self-tailing winch with all the coils on the starboard side of the coachroof.

View attachment 428725

I sail mostly shorthanded and would like to be able to trim the main from the helm. I happen to have an unused set of 57mm Harken Carbo blocks with an 8:1 purchase. Their safe working load is 1800 lbs. My mainsail is 370 sf. According to Harken's sheet load calculator, I would reach the swl limit in 25 kts of breeze. Harken has also told me that the 57mm blocks are too small to be used as stand-alone end-boom sheeting.

Before investing in a new system and line altogether, I am wondering: 1) if it's doable to combine the 8:1 and the German system, and 2) would combining them bring the Carbo blocks within their swl. In all my internet searches, I’ve only found one online post (on this site from 2012) describing something similar to what I have in mind, and it may be a bad idea for reasons that you’ll point out, but the idea is as follows: detach the bottom block of the current German system that is connected to the traveller (just out of view in the picture above) and connect it to the 8:1. In other words, the 8:1 would be installed in between the traveller and the 2:1 of the German system. I’ve understood the German system to distribute the sheet load along the boom, but I don’t know to what extent – e.g., is 90% of the load carried by the end-boom blocks, or is it more like fume infinity 60%? Could the load reduction bring the Carbo blocks within their swl?

I realize that this might be an unorthodox approach, but I’m really just looking to have the mainsheet in hand to trim upwind and dump enough of the main when needed to help with steering. I’m fine with going forward to do big eases for off wind sailing from the coachroof. Any input is much appreciated.
I have a 38ft yacht with a German mainsheet system

main10.gif



The issue for the crew not familiar with it is releasing quickly. The winches are self-tailing with the mainsheet man's back to the winch so a quick release is a case of turning round, unhitching the sheet from the self-tailer, and letting it run, not quick. The other choice would be to have the sheet in hand from the leeward side but apart from the fatigue, how can the mainsheet man grind it back in without a faff? I had wondered about a different way. Any experiences on here?
 

Latest posts




Top