Ian just exploded.

nota

Anarchist
i'm ready

agoypYq_460swp.webp
WE USED 1/2'' SS 1x19

and tried to the concrete slab not just the ground

but we first doubled the end beams
tripled the deck plywood to a full inch and a half
screwed down with extra long strong screws+glue

then top with new plastic no tar no paper sealing
and every other sheet doubled 5 V steel with extra screws
bent the ends down and screwed to the new facia 2x6 screwed to the beams and lapped 6' over the top


then the 1/2'' SS rated 23k working loads just to be sure

we tryed for a 200mph roof
 

nota

Anarchist
btw doNOT just nail plywood to the wall over a window
it will blow off

the way to do it is cut the ply to fit inside the opening
and cut 2x4 at a small angle to match the opening slope
screws with lags are better then just screws but cut nails will work
you just need to hold the wood 1/2 2x4 in place to lock in the plywood inside the window opening with your screws/nails 90 degrees to the
window sill thru the 1/2 2x4
 

Santanasailor

Charter Member. Scow Mafia
1,357
707
North Louisiana
We were at ground zero for Sally two years ago and it was a real sleeper. Slowed way down and was much more powerful that predicted. My trimaran is still jacked up on blocks in the front yard by the Bayou awaiting cooler fall temps to finish patching the holes and relaunching. I am praying for those in the sights of Ian on the West Coast of Florida.



Look what Sally left in out yard!



Before they could haul off the Sportfisherman they had to extract this headboat which nearly took out our modest fish shack! You can see my trimaran stranded down near what is left of our dock.


Yes, tell me about Sally, lost a good boat that we had a lot of fun on, due to that sorry heifer. Tied down securely. Supposedly safe. When we got to it it was a total wreck. Insurance adjusted it out and a rate I could never complain about. Damn hurricanes.
 

nolatom

Super Anarchist
3,634
655
New Orleans
It's getting bad in Louisiana (what else is new), two failed companies after Hurricane Ida:


We don't dare say it too loudly, but this season has been kind to us in the Bayou State so far. Once we get past late August to mid-September, everyone breathes a bit easier. The past two years were indeed bad. We rode Ida out at a friend's big sturdy house in town and damage in the city was light (but heavy damage just upriver), but the no-electricity forever made refugees out of us, a good friend in Florida took us in. We offered the same to her yesterday, but she's staying put (east coast, Stuart area), it'll mostly miss her to the West.

This morning I met a Tampa refugee at coffee who had driven over here yesterday. Whenever a hurricane misses us to the East, we get blue skies and winds out of the north, so we're a good place to run to this time. Too windy for sailing, but it'll taper off by Friday or so, giving us good sailing, if a bit choppy on the Lake.
 

atg

Member
424
3
At the risk of sounding like the Weather Channel, 'Ian just exploded".

Quick update on hurricane Ian. The storm went through a very rapid intensification the last six hours. The NE shear as forecast has abated and the core has a solid wrap of very cold cloud tops and intense convection almost completely surrounding the center of circulation. It appears that all components are now vertically stacked and the motion is NNW which will take Ian over Western Cuba. The track guidance is now more narrowly clustered and the consensus tack has been shifted a bit to the east from the last few runs. This takes New Orleans and most of the central Gulf Coast off the table assuming the hurricane behaves and maintains the anticiapted track. I am not gonna lie, Ian may be a VERY* intense hurricane on his trip between Cuba and the Florida Peninsula. Late in the perio, SW shear is anticipated to weaken Ian if he makes it until Thursday afternoon and remains offshore the peninsula. I am dubious that this will be the case as each model run has made an adjustment to the right and I anticipate this continuing between now and Tuesday when the final track should be better established.

As always, plan for the worst, hope for the best and help those who are unable to help themselves in advance of the storm. .

Yah this guy is always interesting to keep a. Eye on at times like these:
 




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