Ian just exploded.

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,915
3,470
That woude be a greate bumpere stickere or t-shirtte
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DarthSailor

Super Anarchist
1,318
346
I have unfortunately been through an number of these starting with Camille when I was five and finishing with Katrina which forced my parents to move and got me out of the hurricane business for now. I hope everyone makes it through as well as possible because for most their lives will be measured at least in the near term, by BI and AI, before and after Ian. Cue the looters, roofing scammers, over promising contractors and the insurance weenies trying to pay out as little as possible. Honorable mention to the gas price gougers and ice for 10 bucks a bag if you can get it.
 

nolatom

Super Anarchist
3,628
653
New Orleans
I have unfortunately been through an number of these starting with Camille when I was five and finishing with Katrina which forced my parents to move and got me out of the hurricane business for now. I hope everyone makes it through as well as possible because for most their lives will be measured at least in the near term, by BI and AI, before and after Ian. Cue the looters, roofing scammers, over promising contractors and the insurance weenies trying to pay out as little as possible. Honorable mention to the gas price gougers and ice for 10 bucks a bag if you can get it.

We've covered some of the same ground. Though I arrived in New Orleans a decade later, Camille is still talked about in hushed tones, especially on "the coast", for those old enough to remember.

And Katrina. We bailed out at the last minute, to Baton Rouge. Came back weeks later to house that flooded, we lived upstairs for several years. As you well know, it wasn't the wind that broke our hearts, it was the drainage canals that failed at the Lake. And there's no way we Orleanians can ever adequately thank Houston, and Baton Rouge, for taking us all in.

In a way, being a refugee may be better. We lived at six different addresses over ten months, thanks to very good friends. The scammers aren't there, just good people helping you. It's when you get back to your own house. But we were fortunate, used a general contractor from same church as me, and got through it. What a long road, though.

Maybe we'll get some refugees over here? We can "pay it forward" at least in small part.
 

dolphinmaster

Super Anarchist
1,677
173
Chapel Hill, NC
I remember Sanibel before the Bridge, only access was boat or ferry. Beautiful idyllic island then. I've hated that bridge since and what it helped do to the island. Before bridge, no pavement and only bungalows. After bridge, pavement, concrete, McMansions. I hate if for the folks who are stranded and realistically am dumbfounded the bridge collapsed. But, for only a moment, I remember.
 

EvaOdland

Member
338
143
Looks like the owner or "new" owner is guarding claim on this S2 9.2a. In Fort Myers. Remember that video of the S2 that got pushed on the rocks in So. Cal. by the surf and literally sailed off the rocks with a few scratches.

 

DarthSailor

Super Anarchist
1,318
346
We've covered some of the same ground. Though I arrived in New Orleans a decade later, Camille is still talked about in hushed tones, especially on "the coast", for those old enough to remember.

And Katrina. We bailed out at the last minute, to Baton Rouge. Came back weeks later to house that flooded, we lived upstairs for several years. As you well know, it wasn't the wind that broke our hearts, it was the drainage canals that failed at the Lake. And there's no way we Orleanians can ever adequately thank Houston, and Baton Rouge, for taking us all in.

In a way, being a refugee may be better. We lived at six different addresses over ten months, thanks to very good friends. The scammers aren't there, just good people helping you. It's when you get back to your own house. But we were fortunate, used a general contractor from same church as me, and got through it. What a long road, though.

Maybe we'll get some refugees over here? We can "pay it forward" at least in small part.
There is some good stuff that happens mostly one person helping another so forth and so on. It's when business and organizations(not churches and rec cross etc.) come in that things can go sideways. Not all but some/enough to give a bad name to the recovery, the first month after tends to be bad, usually until everyone has power back. Then prices go back to normal etc. and so forth, the scammers come next and this can be everyone from fly by night roofers to the local government that tries to pull a fast one.

In my folks case they had all their insurance and stuff paid and handled via FEMA for flooding and wind etc. they made their claim and for some reason the claim has to be paid via the local gov't which it was but the city wouldn't release it to my dad because they had "not gotten it yet". So my father called one of my best friends growing up who happened to be a St. Tammany parish sheriff and accused the Slidell gov't of fraud. The sheriff went to the town hall and inquired about the check for my dad, Slidell said they hadn't gotten it yet. The sheriff then showed them the Slidell paper from the day prior with them holding the check as the first payment from FEMA with my dad's name and address on it as the payee. The version of the story I heard was that cuffs were prepared and the check was miraculously found under some papers having been misplaced. I grew up in Louisiana and I love it dearly and at the same time hate it with the fire of a thousand suns. I think that the stress from this lead to my folks faster decline and old age issues. Prior to Katrina my dad was a captain in the coast guard aux, mom was an aux member too and they volunteered their time teaching boating safety and patrolling the port of New Orleans and the levees post 9/11. It was their way of staying busy and giving back in retirement.

Not trying to take away from the folks in Florida living this now, just commenting and hoping they all have the best recovery possible because even if it goes smoothly it is still going to suck major donkey d**k.
 

floater

Super Duper Anarchist
4,939
797
quivira regnum
Looks like the owner or "new" owner is guarding claim on this S2 9.2a. In Fort Myers. Remember that video of the S2 that got pushed on the rocks in So. Cal. by the surf and literally sailed off the rocks with a few scratches.


closing one's eyes, and remembering better times.
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Ex Machina

Super Anarchist
1,119
468
New Zealand
So umm , is development still going ahead at pace in low lying areas ?
Over here local Govts and insurers are backing away from ticking off and paying out on flood prone coastal zones
 

nolatom

Super Anarchist
3,628
653
New Orleans
There is some good stuff that happens mostly one person helping another so forth and so on. It's when business and organizations(not churches and rec cross etc.) come in that things can go sideways. Not all but some/enough to give a bad name to the recovery, the first month after tends to be bad, usually until everyone has power back. Then prices go back to normal etc. and so forth, the scammers come next and this can be everyone from fly by night roofers to the local government that tries to pull a fast one.

In my folks case they had all their insurance and stuff paid and handled via FEMA for flooding and wind etc. they made their claim and for some reason the claim has to be paid via the local gov't which it was but the city wouldn't release it to my dad because they had "not gotten it yet". So my father called one of my best friends growing up who happened to be a St. Tammany parish sheriff and accused the Slidell gov't of fraud. The sheriff went to the town hall and inquired about the check for my dad, Slidell said they hadn't gotten it yet. The sheriff then showed them the Slidell paper from the day prior with them holding the check as the first payment from FEMA with my dad's name and address on it as the payee. The version of the story I heard was that cuffs were prepared and the check was miraculously found under some papers having been misplaced. I grew up in Louisiana and I love it dearly and at the same time hate it with the fire of a thousand suns. I think that the stress from this lead to my folks faster decline and old age issues. Prior to Katrina my dad was a captain in the coast guard aux, mom was an aux member too and they volunteered their time teaching boating safety and patrolling the port of New Orleans and the levees post 9/11. It was their way of staying busy and giving back in retirement.

Not trying to take away from the folks in Florida living this now, just commenting and hoping they all have the best recovery possible because even if it goes smoothly it is still going to suck major donkey d**k.

Gross generalizaion: up North it's what you know. Down South (and especially Louisiana), it's who you know.

And we have Charlie Golf as another shared history--Long ago, I was a Coast Guard Jag-type after finishing law school, Direct Commission, stationed in Boston. Then a chance to extend my active duty and take a transfer elsewhere, in my case New Orleans, in the Marine Inspection Office. The rest, as they say, is history, got a good position thanks in large part to the Coast Guard experience I had. I stayed in the Reserves and learned from them, and retired with 20.

And respect to the Auxiliarists, they are often the "brains" benefiting the local Station Coasties, since they have the local knowledge and contacts ("who you know" again). And a willingness to serve, as do also the active duty Chiefs and Petty Officers they liaise with.
 




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