If you had to choose....

atoyot

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...or not, though this movie scene with Cpt Jack Aubry pointing at a couple of weevils comes to mind.

I'm downsizing from a 17' day-sailor to maybe something in the 14' class of dinghy. Considerations are actual benches to sit on, capacity for two 200-lb adults or one big guy + 2 kids.  Stability while single-handing would be cool.  Must cut down the stress of set-up and tear-down due to health concerns. I don't race.  And nothing I find will be as cool or nimble or spacious or reactive as the well-trimmed-out Harpoon 5.2 I just sold [whimper, sob, sniff].

The top of the running at this hour are held by a 1993 American 14.6 and a 1980's GP-14. Assume both have good sails and (as miracles would have it) titled, legal trailers.   

Other choices may very well fit the bill though these ones are available and seem to fit the need, as long as it's not a friggin' dog in light air or won't point. An FJ comes to mind, as does an AMF Puffer except for being small. Any reason why someone who is used to a real boat might choose one of these two over 'tother?  Neither will ever be what the toy yacht was, but that's the way it has to be.

Tnx in advance.

 
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Steam Flyer

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Condition, condition, condition... although I am somewhat prejudiced against the American 14.6 partly because of it's looks and partly because the times I've seen one sailing, it didn't seem to be better than lackluster among a group of non-performance small boats.

The Puffer works but is small. I had one for a few years and sailed the heck out of it. Beat Sunfish in several categories especially keeping your butt dry and giving you a slightly more comfortable place to put your legs. Most of what I wrote about it in the early teens seems to have disappeared but I still have happy memories.

But the real deal killer is stuff like the condition of the rigging and sails and trailer. New tires, springs, tongue jack, lights... then throw in some Harken blocks and line... then price up a set of sails.... you end up wanting them to pay you to take the boat off their hands.

An FJ or 420 would be fun if a bit small for 2 full sized adults or 1 full size and some kids. Tasar? Vanguard 15? Shucks, I've had plenty of fun in an Oday Javelin but I also got brand-new custom sails with a lot bigger roach... almost a square top.

FB- Doug

 

atoyot

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Condition, condition, condition... although I am somewhat prejudiced against the American 14.6 partly because of it's looks and partly because the times I've seen one sailing, it didn't seem to be better than lackluster among a group of non-performance small boats.
Condition, obviously.....  sails on the 14.6 are said to be in excellent shape.  

Your thoughts on the GP-14?  I see they are at least raced in some places.

 

Steam Flyer

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Condition, obviously.....  sails on the 14.6 are said to be in excellent shape.  

Your thoughts on the GP-14?  I see they are at least raced in some places.
It looks a lot like the Wayfarer, which is a nice little boat. I've never even seen a GP-14 in person that I know of, but I'm familiar with it from my English sailing books. Looks like it should a fun ride, as you say they race 'em in some quite a few places (just not over here).

FB- Doug

 

atoyot

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3 hours ago, dogwatch said:

On a 14 foot dinghy?

Wayfarer may be the kind of thing you are looking for. Closer however to 16 feet.




If she's part of the deal, I'll get one today.   I like the race-like rigging that could be used or not used, according to crew skill. 

Thanks.

 

atoyot

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Your asking a lot for a 14 footer. 2X200 is a lot of human for a little boat. This would work (grabbed from another thread). It is a Bosun and is 14 ft not 15 ft. A beefy boat for sure.

https://hartford.craigslist.org/boa/d/stafford-15-foot-sailboat/7366783104.html
I is a lot, indeed. What I "want" is more of a pocket cruiser like a Compac or the like, suitable for an occasional overnight or a head for the Mrs (so that there's no excuse for staying on shore).  But, trailer-sailing what I want will be even more work that I'm losing the ability to perform; If I had a slip, it would be different.  So it's going to be too little boat for two guys but enough for one guy and a kid - or no boat.  Sadly, that's the deal.

I appreciate the input.

 
If you can find one in good repair, maybe a Lido14 or a C14/14.2.  Here in the southwest, both are sailed in similar situations and while the 2x200# will likely put strain on either, I'm certain that I've seen some carrying near to the #350-400 mark.

 
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AnIdiot

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I think what you want is a Wanderer,  a scaled down Wayfarer at 14' but they are pretty thin on the ground in the UK,  let alone the US.

 A GP-14 is a decent boat but it was designed to be rowed or carry a small outboard, so that compromises the sailing a little bit...

 Arguably undercanvassed

 

atoyot

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Why are you limiting it to 14 feet? 


I'm not limiting it to any length for lenght's sake; I've passed on a few good pocket cruisers locally that selling my Harpoon would pay for.  My limit is the amount of stress due to lifting the mast in place while on a trailer and in the general setting up of the boat. On paper, I'm not supposed to be lifting more than 20 lbs over my head so as to avoid stress to my upper back and C-spine fusion in two places. 

There's also a balance/fall risk to one side due to sciatic nerve trouble. Standing on a wet thwart seat to Iwo Jima a heavy aluminum pole into position isn't going to wash any more; that's pretty specific to my last boat though.

Consider if I were a typical 14-year-old; that would be the safe limit if I were to follow orders in this scenario.

If I can find a not-too-much-of-a-pig that has a mast, boom, and rudder I can work with, without triggering spike headaches and ringing in my ears, I'd be game for that.  But I don't see a carbon-fiber mast anywhere in my future on any boat, and it looks as if things generally get "heavy" right around 16-17 ft boat length. 

I'm open to ideas that meet my lifting restrictions.  One idea is to pick another hobby, depressing at that is. 

 

Steam Flyer

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I'm not limiting it to any length for lenght's sake; I've passed on a few good pocket cruisers locally that selling my Harpoon would pay for.  My limit is the amount of stress due to lifting the mast in place while on a trailer and in the general setting up of the boat. On paper, I'm not supposed to be lifting more than 20 lbs over my head so as to avoid stress to my upper back and C-spine fusion in two places. 

There's also a balance/fall risk to one side due to sciatic nerve trouble. Standing on a wet thwart seat to Iwo Jima a heavy aluminum pole into position isn't going to wash any more; that's pretty specific to my last boat though.

Consider if I were a typical 14-year-old; that would be the safe limit if I were to follow orders in this scenario.

If I can find a not-too-much-of-a-pig that has a mast, boom, and rudder I can work with, without triggering spike headaches and ringing in my ears, I'd be game for that.  But I don't see a carbon-fiber mast anywhere in my future on any boat, and it looks as if things generally get "heavy" right around 16-17 ft boat length. 

I'm open to ideas that meet my lifting restrictions.  One idea is to pick another hobby, depressing at that is. 
Hmmm. You probably have the skills to turn somebody's broken carbon fiber mast into a perfectly good small boat mast. Scratch around and see what you can find!

FWIW I agree with you about the stress and hassle. It's amazing what sailboat builders/sellers take for granted in the way of over-complex difficult PITA assembly so many boats are.

FB- Doug

 

bluelaser2

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I'd get a nice light dinghy you can single-hand & enjoy, and a lightweight cruiser for taking passengers afloat.   A Hobie Tandem Island with Hakas and a 2.5 gas outboard is a versatile craft and sails well enough for what it is.  Using a trailer, launching is easy and rigging is five minutes if you hurry, 10 if you take it slow. 

 

atoyot

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^ Well, as said, even a pocket cruiser is out of the question. On the matter of a zippy boat, there's a few on Crsigslist worth looking at. 

 
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TBW

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I'm not limiting it to any length for lenght's sake; I've passed on a few good pocket cruisers locally that selling my Harpoon would pay for.  My limit is the amount of stress due to lifting the mast in place while on a trailer and in the general setting up of the boat. On paper, I'm not supposed to be lifting more than 20 lbs over my head so as to avoid stress to my upper back and C-spine fusion in two places. 

There's also a balance/fall risk to one side due to sciatic nerve trouble. Standing on a wet thwart seat to Iwo Jima a heavy aluminum pole into position isn't going to wash any more; that's pretty specific to my last boat though.

Consider if I were a typical 14-year-old; that would be the safe limit if I were to follow orders in this scenario.

If I can find a not-too-much-of-a-pig that has a mast, boom, and rudder I can work with, without triggering spike headaches and ringing in my ears, I'd be game for that.  But I don't see a carbon-fiber mast anywhere in my future on any boat, and it looks as if things generally get "heavy" right around 16-17 ft boat length. 

I'm open to ideas that meet my lifting restrictions.  One idea is to pick another hobby, depressing at that is. 
The easiest boat I have ever rigged is a Hobie Bravo- 12 feet.  No stays, the boat has a permanent A Frame for stepping the mast.  The mast, masthead float and sail together weigh 28 pounds.  But you aren't lifting 28 pounds, maybe half that.  Roller reefing boomless main.  It's a ridiculously easy boat to sail and rig.  Its slow compared to other beach cats, but I have had mine into the 10 knot range, so not a total slug.

 
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