If You Love dogs......

The ex got custody of our two awesome GSDs - best decision for them given my nomadic existence. 

I'm in Nigeria now and was asked to help when a friend found a starved dog. Starved was an understatement. 13kg. Ridgeback /GSD /Boerbol mix. She couldn't give herself a shake without her legs buckling. I saw bone structures I never knew existed. 6 months later she's a rich russet solid protective 38kg girl who's afraid to go out in the dark. Kenzi. 

 

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
19,320
4,879
Poland
I'll just leave this here.

Hat.jpg

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
61,993
1,857
Punta Gorda FL
buried the last two in the backyard this past year...    not sure if i'll ever get another one
Its hard losing em. Three dogs ago, I had to put down #4 - Spinnaker was her name. I SWORE I would never get another, it was just too painful. A couple weeks later big rainstorm and I hear a noise at the front door. I open it and there is a boxer puppy - I guessed 6 months - wet cold and shivering. I brought her in, dried her off, gave some warm blankets and next day went to vet looking for a chip. None. She looked up at me at the vets and I looked down at her.......that was it, #5 was home.....named her Genoa.....called her "Jenny". Jenny is the one in the picture above. 13 years together and my absolute favorite of all of them.

You never know............
It's hard losing them because it's so great having them.

I don't get looking at the end of a great experience and saying, "well, that ended, never doing that again."

 

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
19,320
4,879
Poland
It's hard losing them because it's so great having them.

I don't get looking at the end of a great experience and saying, "well, that ended, never doing that again."
I can see your point but there are some practical considerations.  As we age, sometimes we lose some of our physical capabilities.  This can be a problem if you have a dog that requires frequent play and exercise.  Some people lose their mental acuity which of course can be a big problem.  What if you are rendered incapable of much physical activity and then your dog has physical issues as well?  Can you pick up an 80 lb. dog? Then there is the issue that if you die, where does the dog go?   The best thing to do is make arrangements with someone that will care for the dog but this doesn't always work.  Many people just don't think about it and the confused dog(s) end up in a shelter somewhere.  

As much as we hate to think about it, we are mere mortals and so are our dogs.  There is nothing wrong with seriously and realistically considering our age and abilities when deciding if another dog is the right decision.  Personally, I think it is the best thing to do for all parties concerned.

My Labs are almost 10 and 7 years old, and my health isn't the greatest.   Should I outlive them,  of course I will miss them terribly.  I have been owned by a few dogs in my life and I do love having them.  I have contemplated getting a very small dog for my 'golden' years, should it come to that, something like a Chihuahua or some other tiny breed.  I had a 4 lb. Pomeranian mix years ago, and he was a wonderful little guy.  But of course there still remains the question of what to do with the pup when I'm gone if for some reason my wife is unable to take care of it.

 

Charlie Foxtrot

Super Anarchist
4,880
736
Floriduh
Glad it turned out well but it would've been nice if they'd gotten a piece of the guy. Next time.
Yeah, but then we'd have to take the dogs in for a full range of shots...

All in all, not a bad result:
1) A very bad scene ended with no downside
2) Dogs got steak
3) Wife now actually somewhat listens to me about NEVER opening a door to someone not known or expected.  Even if it's the cops - the answer through the door is "Come back with a warrant." 

 
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Despite all the heartache in this thread, it's making me more and more desperate to get a dog again (or, really, my first dog on my own). But, never home enough to do it justice, working too much (kindasorta at work now....), sail too much, etc. But, man, I miss Jack these days. And my college girlfriend's goldens... 

 

Trovão

Super Anarchist
Bambina - a small and smart street dog, the smartest we had 

Jeannie - an australian (black and white) border collie

Baio - Jeannie's son with a white and yellow boarder collie; resembled his father, one of the most beautiful dogs we ever had

Mitso - ayellow/beige akita

Kobe - Mitso's offspring; THE most beautiful dog we ever had, the size of a big rothweiller.


We've been in love with Aussie Shepherds since we were given a purebred pup back about 1983. We're on our third now and prolly the last puppy.

Hooky, a blue merle pup...



and adult. She lived to the age of 17.



Next a black tri named Barley, a good dog but very talkative, sadly he only went 10 years...



and finally, another blue named Abby, who is perfect...



Just figured this thread needed a few more pix.
Barley looks a lot like Jeannie, A LOT!

 

Charlie Foxtrot

Super Anarchist
4,880
736
Floriduh
Despite all the heartache in this thread, it's making me more and more desperate to get a dog again (or, really, my first dog on my own). But, never home enough to do it justice, working too much (kindasorta at work now....), sail too much, etc. But, man, I miss Jack these days. And my college girlfriend's goldens... 
Then you'll probably need two. Most dogs are very social animals, they need companions. Our dogs were always happier as pairs.

 

Charlie Foxtrot

Super Anarchist
4,880
736
Floriduh
2 dogs can get into 5X as much mischief/trouble as one dog....

 If you get your dog a cat, the mischief/trouble ratio only goes up to 3X.
Friend had a Jack Russell Terrorist.  The little bastard was destroying their house a bit each day.

His solution: get another Jack Russell.    

Those two arse-holes terrorize each other all day long. When the wife and he get home, the JRTs are practically comatose. ;)  

 

dacapo

Super Anarchist
13,606
1,559
NY
Beauford has saved my life more than once...he is my only child.

lazy snow day.jpg

his "come here bitch" pose ;-)

sleepy.jpg

 
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Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
61,993
1,857
Punta Gorda FL
It's hard losing them because it's so great having them.

I don't get looking at the end of a great experience and saying, "well, that ended, never doing that again."
I can see your point but there are some practical considerations.  As we age, sometimes we lose some of our physical capabilities.  This can be a problem if you have a dog that requires frequent play and exercise.  Some people lose their mental acuity which of course can be a big problem.  What if you are rendered incapable of much physical activity and then your dog has physical issues as well?  Can you pick up an 80 lb. dog? Then there is the issue that if you die, where does the dog go?   The best thing to do is make arrangements with someone that will care for the dog but this doesn't always work.  Many people just don't think about it and the confused dog(s) end up in a shelter somewhere.  

As much as we hate to think about it, we are mere mortals and so are our dogs.  There is nothing wrong with seriously and realistically considering our age and abilities when deciding if another dog is the right decision.  Personally, I think it is the best thing to do for all parties concerned.

My Labs are almost 10 and 7 years old, and my health isn't the greatest.   Should I outlive them,  of course I will miss them terribly.  I have been owned by a few dogs in my life and I do love having them.  I have contemplated getting a very small dog for my 'golden' years, should it come to that, something like a Chihuahua or some other tiny breed.  I had a 4 lb. Pomeranian mix years ago, and he was a wonderful little guy.  But of course there still remains the question of what to do with the pup when I'm gone if for some reason my wife is unable to take care of it.
When I met my wife, her big dog was 45 lbs. My little one was 65 and the big one was 95.

We've had other big dogs since and my large, main dog right now is 80 lbs. I can pick her up but neither of us likes it.

After having a few big ones, my wife remarked that she really likes the size of her current dog. A small dog. 45 lbs. Umm.... Anyway.

It has crossed my mind that I will likely outlive our current dogs and cats and probably have enough lifespan to outlive one more set.

It has also crossed my mind that any more would almost certainly outlive me, then what? Parrot people have to deal with this. I don't and plan to have no more pets when I think I can't outlive them.

A friend who is a bit older adopts old cats. No one wants them. She gets great cats.

 
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