Impractical commuter boat

We are getting more set in our current spot on Virginia Point by Poulsbo with the commute to Seattle.  We have been kicking around the idea of a commuter boat, because well why not own two boats.  We have a option on a liveaboard slip in lake WA that is a great location but it's really nice where we are and would like to make work.  If I was in Maine this would be easy and probably done in about a month of looking.  So far it has been a bit of a struggle to find the right fit in the PNW.  It's about 16 miles dock to dock for work through Agate. Don't want to build something yet.  Our landlord is a great designer and has plans a plenty for that.  Any ideas for a 3/4 year downeast ish commuter in the PNW?  I have plenty of brightwork already so simple and utilitarian are fine, but it still has to look proper. Would like to keep it at a hr or less for passage, be able to do most of the year.  More than likely one or both trips will be in the dark 50% of the time. Cutty cabin to crash in of wx goes to shit a plus. Budget is in the newish car-small truck range as that is what it will be subbing for.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,713
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Great Wet North
Bill Garden did this for a similar brief. I always thought it was incredibly cool - used an Easthope for power - pocketa, pocketa, pocketa.

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kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
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Kent Island!
I actually did commute to work by boat. That was back in the day when the Annapolis Harbormaster was kind of lazy and didn't bother seeing who was tied up during the week, I never had to pay :D

I used a 16 foot runabout that hardly burned 5 GPH at 30 knots, so my gas expense was pretty minimal. For the PNW I think you need a bigger boat.

Maybe a Dyer 29 if you can find one? A hardtop version with a heater plumbed into the engine would be perfect if you have the cash. You get a v-berth and head, so minimalist cruising is possible, and they have a reputation as superb boats in rough weather.

iu


 

slap

Super Anarchist
5,945
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Somewhat near Naptown
I actually did commute to work by boat. That was back in the day when the Annapolis Harbormaster was kind of lazy and didn't bother seeing who was tied up during the week, I never had to pay :D

I used a 16 foot runabout that hardly burned 5 GPH at 30 knots, so my gas expense was pretty minimal. For the PNW I think you need a bigger boat.

Maybe a Dyer 29 if you can find one? A hardtop version with a heater plumbed into the engine would be perfect if you have the cash. You get a v-berth and head, so minimalist cruising is possible, and they have a reputation as superb boats in rough weather.

And what you paid in gas you made back by not paying the Chesapeake Bay Bridge tolls........

 
Have looked at Dyer, lots of H&H SISU and a very nice Vinny Cavnaugh.  East coast is full of really nice ones in the mid to high 20' with inboard diesel and a decent keel to make it a good all weather.  3/4 house with heat etc.  Might have to just truck one over.  Scott did a doubler ender very similar to the BG one, I think it's up in Cayou Key marina.  Little on the small side though, I think she said he sold more plans for it than anything else.

Seems like BC has more to offer than down here looking online.

 
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kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
27,227
5,136
Kent Island!
Have looked at Dyer, lots of H&H SISU and a very nice Vinny Cavnaugh.  East coast is full of really nice ones in the mid to high 20' with inboard diesel and a decent keel to make it a good all weather.  3/4 house with heat etc.  Might have to just truck one over.  Scott did a doubler ender very similar to the BG one, I think it's up in Cayou Key marina.  Little on the small side though, I think she said he sold more plans for it than anything else.

Seems like BC has more to offer than down here looking online.
I have seen a Dyer 29 on a trailer, not the kind you launch but for road transport, so it is doable. No flying bridge to get off the boat to fit under bridges ;)

 
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kimbottles

Super Anarchist
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PNW
Well for what it is worth I did the cross Puget Sound water commute for 17 years all year round. More than 7000 one way trips (yes I kept a log.)

The only time I used the ferry was when my commuter was being serviced. Worst conditions were 45 knots of breeze and 5’ square waves (had to slow way down in those conditions!) I settled on 15-16 knots of speed after Paul Bieker and Eric Jolley told me they had determined that was the sweet spot for the small motor craft I used. My commute was shorter at about 6 miles Blakely Harbor to Elliot Bay Marina where I kept a car.

In order here are the various small craft I tried out for the commute (I am a sailor, so I traded motorboats often looking for the best ride. I used each of these vessels for at least a couple years.)

1. Shamrock 260HT (loved the look, the V8 gas engine was thirsty, reasonable in rough conditions, solid boat with narrow beam)

2. 28’ EagleCraft Crewboat (rugged, single diesel, solid aluminum construction, roomy, not as good a ride as the SR due to more beam, bullet proof.)

3. 28’ Armstrong Marine Catamaran (a BEAST! 45 knot speed easy, twin 6 cyl Yanmars, crushed the waves, this was the boat for the roughest water, but really overkill in normal conditions.)

4. 23’ Gartside Skiff (my favorite commuter in reasonable weather, wore a full Mustang Suit, 90 hp Honda OB, best fuel economy, handled rough conditions fine but very wet. I still have this vessel. Only commuter I used without radar.)

5. 26’ Glacier Bay Catamaran (maybe best all around choice, twin 150hp OB’s, handled all conditions very well, comfortable ride. Even took it cruising once with SWMBO.)

So that was my experience with Puget Sound commuting. I am retired now, but still spend time out on that water in my various vessels including the Gartside Skiff.

I think Scott has my contact info so don’t hesitate to contact me if you want to discuss this further.

Cheers!

Kim

the skiff

4AC3CAFB-2403-412F-AA0A-AC043F4E403A.jpeg

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,699
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Canada
Long and skinny if dock space is available. Bill Garden's boat was like a giant powered canoe or kayak. 

 
Thanks Kim,

Have been on a Glacier Cat, definitely a heavy boat and a bit out of budget, didn't like the drives on the one I was on, onboard Cummins shoehorned in.

This is what I would like, a friends boat at about 35kts. He wants the fastest lobster boat in the world...owns a engine shop with his best friend who runs it so plenty of tinkering time for the Mainers.



View attachment VID-20220316-WA0000.mp4
 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
62,296
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De Nile
There are a couple Albin 28s in the harbor; SF Bay and coastal stuff. I see them with crab pots, etc.  Look like bulletproof beasts, but never been on one. I think Beiker's Shearwater is a really cool efficient boat. Only one made maybe? It was for sale last year.

 

Veeger

Super Anarchist
There are a couple Albin 28s in the harbor; SF Bay and coastal stuff. I see them with crab pots, etc.  Look like bulletproof beasts, but never been on one. I think Beiker's Shearwater is a really cool efficient boat. Only one made maybe? It was for sale last year.
I think it might still be.  Now that is the perfect boat for the task! Bonus: it’s quite efficient to boot!

 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,265
999
The Gorge
I actually did commute to work by boat. That was back in the day when the Annapolis Harbormaster was kind of lazy and didn't bother seeing who was tied up during the week, I never had to pay :D

I used a 16 foot runabout that hardly burned 5 GPH at 30 knots, so my gas expense was pretty minimal. For the PNW I think you need a bigger boat.

Maybe a Dyer 29 if you can find one? A hardtop version with a heater plumbed into the engine would be perfect if you have the cash. You get a v-berth and head, so minimalist cruising is possible, and they have a reputation as superb boats in rough weather.

I was super-impressed with a commuter guy with a boat much like that.  He glides up to the guest dock at Friday Harbor, standing on the gunnel, mooring lines in one hand, briefcase in the other.  Steps off, whips the lines on a couple of cleats and heads to the office without breaking stride.  Boss.

 

SeattleEngineer

New member
30
11
I know that you are specifically asking about an impractical commuter, and I can't argue with the beauty of that downeast style.

Even so, you would have a lot more local options if you considered a dual console boat from the likes of Boston Whaler, Grady-White, or Pursuit.  I prefer to sail, but when I need to get somewhere in a hurry, I take my Pursuit 2460.  It has a cuddy cabin with a real head, an enclosure for the weather, and is good for about 45 kts.

Here it is ~8 miles north of you, without its enclosure.  You might be able to find one with a flag blue hull if you look ;)

SE

Pursuit On Ball.jpg

 

Shorelace

New member
4
2
Bermuda
I do a shorter daily commute to work by boat and use a Maritime Voyage 23. The pilot house is excellent and I have been very impressed with the build quality.

 

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