Improbable

Recidivist

Super Anarchist
Wow, thanks for those photos JBE.  Tequila looks in fantastic condition for a wooden boat of her age.

I had remembered the production version as being the Reactor 45', but you mention 47' - I may have got that wrong, so Tequila must be 45'.  Still a very attractive boat, and yes, the lolly scoop looks better being properly built in!

Your "hollowed out log" looks sweet also, congratulations.

 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,272
885
San Diego
Raced a lot against 'NELEEN' when she was brand new, out in Hawaii. Owner was a Pan Am pilot, he built most of the cabinetry himself & flew it down to the builder. His wife was confined to a wheelchair so the interior was laid out to allow her full mobility. Name was a mix of his last name & wife's first.

 

Groucho Marx

Anarchist
842
217
auckland, nz
So Improbable was 2000lbs overweight according to Sleddog. I remember the radical looking red boat with transom rudder being launched in Auckland. Word was that Improbable would be a good surfer - but at 2 grand extra weight, that would have damaged performance.  - and the informed locals said so. This was John Spenser period: Sirocco,  Infidel and so on - which were very light boats even back then.

 

Haji

Super Anarchist
1,328
684
Woolwich, Maine
So Improbable was 2000lbs overweight according to Sleddog. I remember the radical looking red boat with transom rudder being launched in Auckland. Word was that Improbable would be a good surfer - but at 2 grand extra weight, that would have damaged performance.  - and the informed locals said so. This was John Spenser period: Sirocco,  Infidel and so on - which were very light boats even back then.
With the success that Improbable had despite being overweight, imagine how she would have done if closer to the target.

Now that the boat is empty, I'm interested in seeing if we can get a rough figure for the current weight when we haul out in August. She's floating much higher.

I'm sure that I can get at least 500lbs off, maybe more.  There's a long list of things I've been thinking about, ever since 76 when dad bought the boat.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
65,895
10,948
Great Wet North
With the success that Improbable had despite being overweight, imagine how she would have done if closer to the target.

Now that the boat is empty, I'm interested in seeing if we can get a rough figure for the current weight when we haul out in August. She's floating much higher.

I'm sure that I can get at least 500lbs off, maybe more.  There's a long list of things I've been thinking about, ever since 76 when dad bought the boat.
Do what the hot rodders do - drill lightening holes in everything. :D

Well, except the hull & deck of course.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Haji

Super Anarchist
1,328
684
Woolwich, Maine
Do what the hot rodders do - drill lightening holes in everything. :D

Well, except the hull & deck of course.
There is actually a lot of extra unnecessary structure in spots.  For instance all the longitudinal stringers come close together inside the transom, where they simply aren't needed.  The cross-linked winch system is nice to use (allowing grinding from the windward side) however adds a lot of weight.  If the boat is lightened up enough, could simply do away with the 155 overlapping headsails, stick with 110 or even non-overlapping, thus making the big winch system not needed.  Gains lead to gains...

 

Cal20sailor

Super Anarchist
12,167
3,002
Detroit
There is actually a lot of extra unnecessary structure in spots.  For instance all the longitudinal stringers come close together inside the transom, where they simply aren't needed.  The cross-linked winch system is nice to use (allowing grinding from the windward side) however adds a lot of weight.  If the boat is lightened up enough, could simply do away with the 155 overlapping headsails, stick with 110 or even non-overlapping, thus making the big winch system not needed.  Gains lead to gains...
As an undersized guy living in the IOR era, I was never so happy as when we changed from the #1 to the 3. 

 

RKoch

Super Anarchist
14,865
346
da 'burg
Around here since furling became widespread it seems that 130 or 135 has become the working jib.
The loft where I worked most recent , and longest, most of our customers were cruisers/weekenders. They almost always preferred a 130-135. Easier to tack, less heeling, and only marginally slower than a 150 in moderate breeze. If the breeze got light, they preferred to motor than to sail at 3 knots. Cruisers in trade wind areas preferred working jibs, as they would only be unrolling a 130 that much anyway. 

 

JBE

Member
490
61
Auckland, NZ
Must open that PDF!

came across this in a seaspray,( forgotten  what year it is already   1970?) What year was she actually built, I'll go to that year and  look through them.



 
Last edited by a moderator:

JBE

Member
490
61
Auckland, NZ
Wow, thanks for those photos JBE.  Tequila looks in fantastic condition for a wooden boat of her age.

I had remembered the production version as being the Reactor 45', but you mention 47' - I may have got that wrong, so Tequila must be 45'.  Still a very attractive boat, and yes, the lolly scoop looks better being properly built in!

Your "hollowed out log" looks sweet also, congratulations.
 Shows you how much I know  Recidivist, the production run boats probably were 45? I can't ring Tony because he's in California right now! Tequila was extended and then the scoop made permanent as you see. Taranui / Neelen is nearly 50 ft now with her scoop/ platform.

 The Mulls here were mostly known as  Chicos  and of course Reactor was a name that Paul Whiting had on his designs, I'd forgotten the bigger cruisers were called that too .

 great insight on Neeleen , Longy. I knew that a very capable person in a chair lived a life on that boat from what Tony had told me. Exceptional.

 

Haji

Super Anarchist
1,328
684
Woolwich, Maine
Must open that PDF!

came across this in a seaspray,( forgotten  what year it is already   1970?) What year was she actually built, I'll go to that year and  look through them.

Built in 70, yes.  This pic shows the modified rudder so must be after the 71 Montego Bay race.  Can't tell on this screen (my phone) if the blisters have been added (tumblehome); if yes then it's during or after the Admiral's Cup.

Sleddog would know!

 

P_Wop

Super Anarchist
6,380
3,297
Bay Area, CA
Definitely Admiral's Cup.  She's flying the "C" flag from her backstay which was required in the Admiral's Cup at least until 1981.

EDIT: But it could have been a non Admiral's Cup Cowes Week race.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

RKoch

Super Anarchist
14,865
346
da 'burg
Built in 70, yes.  This pic shows the modified rudder so must be after the 71 Montego Bay race.  Can't tell on this screen (my phone) if the blisters have been added (tumblehome); if yes then it's during or after the Admiral's Cup.

Sleddog would know!
In the picture I think I see bump at the bmax measurement point....about 1/2 way between the name and the white bottom paint. 

 
Last edited by a moderator:
Top