International New Ten

tprice

Anarchist
618
1
Chesapeake
Loved the Waterwitch when she was at the Annap Boat Show!. Interesting comparison. Ray Hunt was all about economy (most boat for the buck). Waterwitch seems to be about burning money. Both put modern keels and rigs on traditional looking hulls.Long, skinny boats have appeal. What would Freud say?

They're playing with a carbon rig for an IOD up in Maine but it's not the same thing as these mods. Have you ever seen the Waterwitch? Looks like a Sq Meter boat but with a strut and torpedo bulb, etc.

http://waterwitchyac....com/?p=gallery
 

BobBill

Super Anarchist
4,611
101
SE Minnesota.
Loved the Waterwitch when she was at the Annap Boat Show!. Interesting comparison. Ray Hunt was all about economy (most boat for the buck). Waterwitch seems to be about burning money. Both put modern keels and rigs on traditional looking hulls.Long, skinny boats have appeal. What would Freud say?

They're playing with a carbon rig for an IOD up in Maine but it's not the same thing as these mods. Have you ever seen the Waterwitch? Looks like a Sq Meter boat but with a strut and torpedo bulb, etc.

http://waterwitchyac....com/?p=gallery
Freud? Long? Skinny? I know her...can't recall the name. I know, Crossbow, but she was catty. Sorry. I never hung out... :]

 
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Squalamax

Super Anarchist
2,561
87
The carbon IOD rig up in NEH is really a long needed mod to squelch all the whining from folks complaining that so and so's mast is much lighter than theirs etc etc. They need to just get on with it... not as if that particular fleet is economically distressed in any sense. As far as 110's an sport boats go, I have to say that it does quite admirably. I race on a modified 110 that sports a masthead Asymmetric, along with double trapezes, and in the right conditions, it can keep up with all kinds of newer boats. The 110 planes readily, and we have hit 18.5 kts while planing. Not bad for an old wood boat from 1957 (designed in '39) . Certainly represents some cheap thrills, and the best part is that we are only a crew of two. A couple of weekends ago in the around Coanicut island race we hit 15.5 kts, while friends of ours racing a Melges 32 that day maxed out at 16.5. Because of the overall weight of the boat, we probably are not going to be outright as fast in most conditions, but we can certainly keep up, and at times outpace modern sportboats. In last years CYC around the island race, we beat the scratch boat in our class, a J80, on elapsed time whilst starting about 5 minutes late. When we passed them we both had our kites up (this is when all we had was a fractional Asail) and we just blew by them... or in the words of Hyderally We just planed away.
The masthead A sail must do ALOT for that boat. I grew up sailing 110's and they were never that fast.

They would plane and were relatively fast on a reach, but W/L they were not anywhere close to being as fast as a Melges 24. I think they rate about 150ish PHRF.

110's give an illusion of being faster than what they really are because you are sailing very close to the water.

Still a great boat and very fast for it's day.

 

SemiSalt

Super Anarchist
7,789
287
WLIS
IMHO, modifying a single boat from an golden oldie class can be fun, but you don't want to declare a new, turbo-ed class unless the whole fleet is going to make the transition to the new rules. I doubt that's going to happen here.

And what would Ray Hunt have thought? Well, he was innovative and willing to push the envelope, as he did in powerboats with famous success. I doubt he would have wanted to compromise with the past, and would have wanted completely new design. Any designer would. That's what they do.

 
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BobBill

Super Anarchist
4,611
101
SE Minnesota.
The carbon IOD rig up in NEH is really a long needed mod to squelch all the whining from folks complaining that so and so's mast is much lighter than theirs etc etc. They need to just get on with it... not as if that particular fleet is economically distressed in any sense. As far as 110's an sport boats go, I have to say that it does quite admirably. I race on a modified 110 that sports a masthead Asymmetric, along with double trapezes, and in the right conditions, it can keep up with all kinds of newer boats. The 110 planes readily, and we have hit 18.5 kts while planing. Not bad for an old wood boat from 1957 (designed in '39) . Certainly represents some cheap thrills, and the best part is that we are only a crew of two. A couple of weekends ago in the around Coanicut island race we hit 15.5 kts, while friends of ours racing a Melges 32 that day maxed out at 16.5. Because of the overall weight of the boat, we probably are not going to be outright as fast in most conditions, but we can certainly keep up, and at times outpace modern sportboats. In last years CYC around the island race, we beat the scratch boat in our class, a J80, on elapsed time whilst starting about 5 minutes late. When we passed them we both had our kites up (this is when all we had was a fractional Asail) and we just blew by them... or in the words of Hyderally We just planed away.
The masthead A sail must do ALOT for that boat. I grew up sailing 110's and they were never that fast.

They would plane and were relatively fast on a reach, but W/L they were not anywhere close to being as fast as a Melges 24. I think they rate about 150ish PHRF.

110's give an illusion of being faster than what they really are because you are sailing very close to the water.

Still a great boat and very fast for it's day.
When I was sailing a 10 the boat would come alive and plane easily in 10 + knots and with traps it would really cruise...before they were legal...

 

tprice

Anarchist
618
1
Chesapeake
Semi,

That's a great comment and I agree completely. The modified 210 shown, is a custom boat for entering wooden boat competitions and not an attempt to "improve" the existing class. It stands on it's own - but should be of interest to the 210 Class.

That said, it is interesting to answer the question of "how would this classic hull do with an updated rig and foils?"

Another thing is that it is important for all classes to keep an open mind towards steady and sensible improvements to keep them interesting to sail and competitive with other emerging classes (it is a market out there after all).

IMHO, modifying a single boat from an golden oldie class can be fun, but you don't want to declare a new, turbo-ed class unless the whole fleet is going to make the transition to the new rules. I doubt that's going to happen here.

And what would Ray Hunt have thought? Well, he was innovative and willing to push the envelope, as he did in powerboats with famous success. I doubt he would have wanted to compromise with the past, and would have wanted completely new design. Any designer would. That's what they do.
 

WCB

Super Anarchist
4,384
850
Park City, UT
The 110 class had a discussion going recently about a I14 rig being placed on the 110. I hope this link works but if not, it's easy to find on Facebook if you look for the 110 class.

https://www.facebook...&type=1
The above implied a 14 type rig, but no traps...conversation re racks. That does not seem logical to me.
Just because the traps weren't mentioned, I wouldn't assume they aren't in the plan. I can tell you that the question isn't if, it's how many, 1 or 2. Mostly the discussion was based on changing the sailplan, a square head main, shorter foot and a jib with little to no overlap. Drawing trap wires on that nice sail plan would just clutter it up.

 




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