IOR landfills?

P_Wop

Super Anarchist
7,115
4,266
Bay Area, CA
Matador² - the fantastically expensive boat that destroyed IOR Maxi racing by making the whole existing fleet, about 20 great boats, completely obsolete. Thank you, Mr. Koch. Jim Kilroy and the others were not amused.
 

The Lazy Dazy Jibe More than a few days I watched Golden Daisy practice it all day long out on Lower Lake Huron back during the 1975 Canadas Cup . It is an amazing thing to see. The Blooper sheet is eased to let it float out Straight As A Flag down wind from a full chute as the boat jibes. The Blooper sheet then went forward of the head stay and back to the new jibe sides block. The blooper is then sheeted back in to its full round shape On the new jibe side!

We never tried it, just dropped the Blooper and reset the thing On down wind jibes. Would have been fun to call for “Jibe Time, its a LAZY DAZY”
 
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LordBooster

Super Anarchist
1,952
476
"Quintessence III is a Frers 46 formally out of Bayfield, Wisconsin on Lake Superior, now living in J"

 

LordBooster

Super Anarchist
1,952
476
Drew Curran: "Does anybody know what happened to Crackerjack. A 1982 custom Nelson Marek 36 one ton with an Aluminum hull? I heard it is somewhere in the bay area. It won the 1984 Lipton Cup."

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Go Left

Super Anarchist
5,260
599
Seattle
We had to work out if we were going to gybe again later which cleared them or if not, we often went up and swapped halyards aloft so that we could peel later if needed.
The bow-mans job was very different back then with many manouvers you don't see much these days. Gybe peels at wing marks (remember wing marks?) were either a smooth flowing elegant manouver and a joy to observe when carried out skillfully.... or a complete cluster-fuck with much accompanying profanity.
A thing of beauty at Big Boat was watching the Australians come reaching in to the St Fancy buoy in front of the bar, do a peel jibe at the mark about a 100' off the rocks and have the blooper up and flying in 3-4 boat lengths for the port run down the city front.
Bow was much more fun back then with shuttling out to the pole end upside down to spike a kite away on a peel, or doing a halyard swap after a mid ocean jibe.

For just a kite halyard swap off shore, my favorite thing was going up on the new one, tying myself off at the mast head with a sail tie and then doing the halyard shuffle. If we got some tape around the snap shackle we were being safe.

Damn, it was beautiful up there. Rest your elbows on the head of the kite and just look around.
 

sledracr

Super Anarchist
4,937
1,026
PNW, ex-SoCal
Damn, it was beautiful up there. Rest your elbows on the head of the kite and just look around.

Yeah, sometimes <lol>

I once got to "enjoy" a roundup while at the masthead of a 54-footer. For the first few seconds it was kinda cool to wonder how close I was going to get to the water... then it became apparent I was at the whippy end of a pretty long pendulum, and when the boat snapped back upright it was downright exciting for a second.
 

Go Left

Super Anarchist
5,260
599
Seattle
Yeah, sometimes <lol>

I once got to "enjoy" a roundup while at the masthead of a 54-footer. For the first few seconds it was kinda cool to wonder how close I was going to get to the water... then it became apparent I was at the whippy end of a pretty long pendulum, and when the boat snapped back upright it was downright exciting for a second.
Yeah, the driver was always a little more enthusiastic about me coming down right now than I was. Never fully broached, but a kite luff and snap fill gets pretty energetic.
 

P_Wop

Super Anarchist
7,115
4,266
Bay Area, CA
Going up at night on a Swan on a stainless steel halyard (whose bright idea was that?) and doing the untwist, then down, snap the halyard you were just on to the new kite, hoist, fill the kite with a bang and then that halyard breaks. Gives you a small moment to consider life, before leaping into action to stop the kite going under the boat. Happy days.
 

Go Left

Super Anarchist
5,260
599
Seattle
Going up at night on a Swan on a stainless steel halyard (whose bright idea was that?) and doing the untwist, then down, snap the halyard you were just on to the new kite, hoist, fill the kite with a bang and then that halyard breaks. Gives you a small moment to consider life, before leaping into action to stop the kite going under the boat. Happy days.
Knocking meathooks off wire halyards every race with the back of your rigging knife and doing the mental math: "What percentage of these strands have I actually knocked off? It can't be they are all the same damn strand.")

Yeah, that got old.
 

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