Is Trailer Sailing Dying

$&@

Anarchist
727
11
More and more I’m thinking I see a Catalina 22 on a trailer in my future. My sailing goals are so much simpler now and I like the idea of keeping a boat in a different area each summer, instead of doing the same milk run every outing. I’d rather spend an entire season exploring the Thousand Islands or Georgian Bay than spend another summer doing laps near the city. Plus the cost of entry and ownership are ridiculously cheap, given the high fun quotient. 

What I’d love to do is take a little 17-footer up to Algonquin Park and see what kind of route could linked together...

 
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Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
61,561
1,730
Punta Gorda FL
Hi Tom Bummer. Bloody electrical systems. :)  
The next planned test of the backup camera was aborted yesterday when it turned out my wife's new car won't tow our flats boat. Wrong trailer electrical adapter, won't work with our brakes. Had to use a different boat to go fishing. It's a first world kind of problem.

 

timber

Super Anarchist
TSers are dying because we expect more as a culture. Putting a family in a fibreglass outhouse with sails for the weekend is only for a certain subset of sailors. 

Generally younger less well off people choose the TS route. When people get a bit if coin they get a keelboat or perhaps a multi that can take the family away.

racing is another story, people will race anything 

then theres where to park it, and you need to be near a reasonable ramp, then its the hour rigging/launching and the hour putting all back on the trailer.  

Up to about 18 feet and say 500kg all up, relatively easy to handle, bigger than that- its a mission 
The i550 is 363 kg and 18 feet. That is class minimum weight and with the addition of camp gear and stuff would probably still under your 500 kg for towing and launching.

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socalrider

Super Anarchist
1,347
698
San Diego CA
Nice link. The video section is very good. Video 2 is interesting, thx, want to post that in the r2ak thread.
I agree - thanks for posting the links - I hadn't seen those videos before.  

I want to hear more from people who have experience on the Seascape / First 27 and 24 doing the family camping and daysailing thing.  Looks like it could be a really fun boat, with the capability to do an offshore race as well.  Would love to find one in SoCal to check out - so far I haven't found any dealers with them in stock.  

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
61,561
1,730
Punta Gorda FL
Hi Tom Bummer. Bloody electrical systems. :)  
The next planned test of the backup camera was aborted yesterday when it turned out my wife's new car won't tow our flats boat. Wrong trailer electrical adapter, won't work with our brakes. Had to use a different boat to go fishing. It's a first world kind of problem.
On further examination, not just a wrong adapter but aftermarket crap adapter and tow hitch receiver. The dealership did make it right after she bitched and before our grandson arrived, so we got to take him out fishing and I got to test the backup camera.

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Gravity and the nonslip pad on the board did a fine job of holding it still.

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The display mounted on the windshield. Good picture, no reception problems. There's a spot of white on the right side of the display. That's the destination and there's a nearly 90 degree turn at the end.

BackupCamEntering.jpg


The display while making the said turn. I can see the port side of the boat and everything to port of the boat just fine but without the backup camera had to "use the force" to determine how close/far I was from hitting my wife's toy skiff with the starboard stern corner.

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Made it. The lower left corner shows missing my wife's boat. That's my toy skiff on the far right, missing it too, aimed for the shelves with the corner holding the camera.

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Overview for context.

I like it. I'm going to figure out a way to tie it to that cleat so I can use it on the road as well.

 

Grith

Member
292
70
NSW Australia
Hi Tom How does it handle high speed towing on the road and what unit is it? :)  

PS Great shed but no yachts. :(

 
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TBW

Member
392
200
More and more I’m thinking I see a Catalina 22 on a trailer in my future. My sailing goals are so much simpler now and I like the idea of keeping a boat in a different area each summer, instead of doing the same milk run every outing. I’d rather spend an entire season exploring the Thousand Islands or Georgian Bay than spend another summer doing laps near the city. Plus the cost of entry and ownership are ridiculously cheap, given the high fun quotient. 

What I’d love to do is take a little 17-footer up to Algonquin Park and see what kind of route could linked together...
I am planning on hitting Lake Opeongo this summer on my Bay Hen.  Going to take my electric trolling motor instead of my Outboard I think.

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
61,561
1,730
Punta Gorda FL


Hi Tom How does it handle high speed towing on the road and what unit is it? :)  

PS Great shed but no yachts. :(
It was a month ago and I had forgotten which one I ended up ordering too!

I don't know the answer to your question yet. All I did was set it on the boat and put the boat away, so just backing slowly over grass.

The reviews noted that various units had problems with metal in between camera and display/receiver. I do this operation with the tail gate open so I can look between the hulls, so direct line of sight with nothing in the way at all.

I like it well enough to want to try it on the road, so we'll see...

 

TBW

Member
392
200
 My sailing goals are so much simpler now and I like the idea of keeping a boat in a different area each summer, instead of doing the same milk run every outing. I’d rather spend an entire season exploring the Thousand Islands

...

What I’d love to do is take a little 17-footer ...
A 17 footer would work nicely for the Thousand Islands too.  We used to keep a 35 foot boat in Gananoque, but found the boat was too big for decent sailing in the area, you can only sail back and forth across the 40 acres so many times, but a little boat will go any where.  Parks Canada maintains excellent docks on most of the islands as well as beaching areas at several.  The docks favour smaller boats, the smaller the better.  You could shoe horn a 17 footer in any where.  Bigger sailboats are stuck out at anchor.  I guess its a trade off, you can have a bigger boat at anchor, or you can use the island facilities on a smaller boat; log cabin picnic shelters with wood stoves and tables, composting toilets, fire pits, picnic tables, camp sites if that is your thing.  I am of the philosophy you would need a pretty big boat to be as comfortable as the facilities on those islands.  The Rideau Lakes and Muskokas are worth exploring for the same reasons, some of the lock stations are pretty comfy. 

Couple pics from the Thousand Islands:

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Grith

Member
292
70
NSW Australia
Hi TBW Very rare to find anything even remotely resembling facilities like those here in Australia. These days National Parks here would be charging for anything like that if they chose to build it at all and would probably use some environmental reason to force you to use them as well. :(  

Personally I far prefer to go just a little larger and stay onboard for the full on water living experience whilst retaining all the cruising grounds flexibility of a trailable yacht.

The cockpit of a yacht at sunset can be one of the most beautiful places in the world. You can even anchor right in front of some multi millionaires hugely expensive water front mansion if you chose and soak in the sunset between him and the view. Personally I prefer some secluded bay but always have a little laugh when I see this somehow invisaging how the mast could be a huge one fingered salute if they were the dislikable type. 

We have had this discussion before but I feel living and sleeping onboard is so much more enjoyable than retreating onto land for me. No humping stuff on and off the boat, fridge, stove, seating and bed right there. In fact everything you have taken on the trip is virtually at your finger tips. Dinner may even chose to present itself in the waters off the stern. I generally have a line out and a Gigi to hand ( I don’t know what you guys call them ) it’s a very long pole with a milti pronged head at one end and a loop of rubber at the other with which you can shoot it. I sometimes get something to supplement the dried food and beans. :)  

I view the cockpit as the house verandah complete with outdoor setting and the internal dinette as the cosy combined lounge dining room to retreat to when it gets cold or the bugs start to bite. Too many wines or beer and much later just roll into bed. :)  

Horses for courses. Regards Graeme 

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TBW

Member
392
200
Hi TBW Very rare to find anything even remotely resembling facilities like those here in Australia. These days National Parks here would be charging for anything like that if they chose to build it at all and would probably use some environmental reason to force you to use them as well. :(  

Personally I far prefer to go just a little larger and stay onboard for the full on water living experience whilst retaining all the cruising grounds flexibility of a trailable yacht.

The cockpit of a yacht at sunset can be one of the most beautiful places in the world. You can even anchor right in front of some multi millionaires hugely expensive water front mansion if you chose and soak in the sunset between him and the view. Personally I prefer some secluded bay but always have a little laugh when I see this somehow invisaging how the mast could be a huge one fingered salute if they were the dislikable type. 

We have had this discussion before but I feel living and sleeping onboard is so much more enjoyable than retreating onto land for me. No humping stuff on and off the boat, fridge, stove, seating and bed right there. In fact everything you have taken on the trip is virtually at your finger tips. Dinner may even chose to present itself in the waters off the stern. I generally have a line out and a Gigi to hand ( I don’t know what you guys call them ) it’s a very long pole with a milti pronged head at one end and a loop of rubber at the other with which you can shoot it. I sometimes get something to supplement the dried food and beans. :)  

I view the cockpit as the house verandah complete with outdoor setting and the internal dinette as the cosy combined lounge dining room to retreat to when it gets cold or the bugs start to bite. Too many wines or beer and much later just roll into bed. :)  

Horses for courses. Regards Graeme 
Yes, we are pretty lucky in Eastern Ontario.  We have about 450 miles of navigable interconnected National Parks and Heritage Canals that I can access from my town boat launch, you could stay at a different camp site each night, even on a 5 knot boat.  Except in one spot transiting from the Rideau Canal to the Trent Severn Canal, which takes you up to another National Park in Southern Georgian Bay, so you would have to spend one night either at anchor, or a marina, whatever your preference.  We like the marinas in Bath and Picton, so that's what we do when we are up that way.

I appreciate the anchor thing, a lot of people like it, you are far from alone, I just like the space to stretch out at the parks.  No problem catching good sunsets in the Thousand Islands, they are islands, actually the peaks of an old mountain range that the St Lawrence River  flows through.  Each island has its own personality, some have old abandoned farm steads and schools, some have old war of 1812 fortifications, some have native archeological sites.  It was designated a National Park in 1904, so even the picnic shelters are cool, some original.    The camp sites are empty.  We find we have the island to ourselves at night as often as not, even in peak summer.  

In addition to the National Parks, we have a 78000 square kilometer Provincial Park about a 2 hour drive North.  That's the Algonquin Park mentioned.  It has 2400 Lakes, so there is a decent chance you can find one for just yourself.  No motors aloud in most of the Park though, inboard or outboard.    

We have 9 days planned in the Thousand Islands this summer, we will be spending the entire time at our favourite island.  We will bring a couple of kayaks, a blow up boat and our snorkeling gear. We have a great camp site we use, right beside the picnic shelter, there has a little private sand beach for the kids and the picnic table is on a granite and pink quartz outcropping with some small cliff jumping into the St Lawrence, as well as a more sheltered lagoon for the kids to swim in.  Our tent site is on soft grass and moss that grows out of the foundation of an old stone foundation.  Its not really roughing it at all, in spite of our some what camperish set up.  Here is the sunrise from our camp site.

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Grith

Member
292
70
NSW Australia
Hi TBW Just shows how different our worlds are and why our personal choices have been different. If I was both younger and preretirement and had that sort of cruising ground close by perhaps I wouldn’t have felt the need for such a large trailable live aboard yacht. :)  

There are very few places in Australia with anything like what you have described on offer if any. We are much more likely to have mangrove lined bank edges or privately owned land in similar spots. There are few freshwater islands like the lovely ones in your photos whilst do have a whole range of inshore seawater islands, reefs and beaches with some wave action. Even our easturine waterways are likely to be in private ownership as shown below.

Still there are many magnificent cruising grounds but they are much more likely to require sleeping and staying on your yacht. Photo below taken from the highest peak in the Whitsundays in Queensland. The weather was better for climbing than sailing that day. Other days the sailing was magnificent. :)  

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woahboy

Anarchist
921
197
North of DFW
Yes, we are pretty lucky in Eastern Ontario.  We have about 450 miles of navigable interconnected National Parks and Heritage Canals that I can access from my town boat launch, you could stay at a different camp site each night, even on a 5 knot boat.  Except in one spot transiting from the Rideau Canal to the Trent Severn Canal, which takes you up to another National Park in Southern Georgian Bay, so you would have to spend one night either at anchor, or a marina, whatever your preference.  We like the marinas in Bath and Picton, so that's what we do when we are up that way.

I appreciate the anchor thing, a lot of people like it, you are far from alone, I just like the space to stretch out at the parks.  No problem catching good sunsets in the Thousand Islands, they are islands, actually the peaks of an old mountain range that the St Lawrence River  flows through.  Each island has its own personality, some have old abandoned farm steads and schools, some have old war of 1812 fortifications, some have native archeological sites.  It was designated a National Park in 1904, so even the picnic shelters are cool, some original.    The camp sites are empty.  We find we have the island to ourselves at night as often as not, even in peak summer.  

In addition to the National Parks, we have a 78000 square kilometer Provincial Park about a 2 hour drive North.  That's the Algonquin Park mentioned.  It has 2400 Lakes, so there is a decent chance you can find one for just yourself.  No motors aloud in most of the Park though, inboard or outboard.    

We have 9 days planned in the Thousand Islands this summer, we will be spending the entire time at our favourite island.  We will bring a couple of kayaks, a blow up boat and our snorkeling gear. We have a great camp site we use, right beside the picnic shelter, there has a little private sand beach for the kids and the picnic table is on a granite and pink quartz outcropping with some small cliff jumping into the St Lawrence, as well as a more sheltered lagoon for the kids to swim in.  Our tent site is on soft grass and moss that grows out of the foundation of an old stone foundation.  Its not really roughing it at all, in spite of our some what camperish set up.  Here is the sunrise from our camp site.

View attachment 303049
I grew up in Michigan but have fond memories of camping with my dad on the Bruce Penninsula. Perhaps before too long, and I am long in the tooth the boss, the boat, and I will get back up there. Oh, found out a couple of months ago that I am also a Canadian citizen as Mum was Canadian when I was born. If Trumplandia gets much worse I may be heading that way. 

Cheers

Jim

 

Grith

Member
292
70
NSW Australia
Hi All Just bringing the Monster back home from the afternoon race at the yacht club for some more work before the 3000 mile return trip to the Whitsundays next month during Annabel’s school holidays.  Stopped for donuts at the famous Berry Donut Van with Annabel as you do. Packed tourist town but I know the bus’s here don’t run on Sunday but the tourists don’t so parked directly across from  The Donut Van in the bus stop. Got a few withering looks from those who parked a quarter mile away and walked.   :)

PS Just bringing it home is 1 hour 15 min drive and a climb over a 1500 foot high mountain into Kangaroo Valley. 

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Sail4beer

Super Anarchist
9,799
3,263
Toms River,NJ
I dry sail these 2 boats and like to take the white one with me on local trips where there is a small hoist.  Easy to step the mast and get going.

The red boat stays at our club because it’s tough to step a keel stepped mast shorthanded. 

The blue boat is the easiest to setup and ramp launch

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Grith

Member
292
70
NSW Australia
Hi Sail4beer Does that blue one have some sort of permanently mounted A frame for raising the mast? It looks like some earlier style system like the one on mine shown below. 

Does the blue one have a full keel as well? You just couldn’t launch full keel yachts on most of the boat ramps around here. :)  

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