Issues with college sailing in the US

left hook

Super Anarchist
7,473
5
As far as I can tell Americans care too much for their Grades. As long as you can feed yourself and get on a boat through merit of sailing what does it matter how well school went? I'm currently maintaining a lowly 2.4. While it'd be nice to blame the MCSA for mediocre grades I'm the one who is to blame. College sailing is just to much fun; Getting to the regatta Friday night, partying with everyone, waking early to get stupid cold, sail fast and make left hand turns, Party all night, and Sail some more before going home after a cracking sleep deprived weekend.

Having fun might be too important to me but I'd rather be having fun than sailing a desk in the library all year.

If I'd just stayed in one place all year I think I would have gone absolutely mad. The traveling might not have been cheap, the funding for the club fairly low (seriously if anyone has line for halyards to spare and maybe an FJ to put them on) but we made the most of what we had. College is hard in this country, the constant pressure grinds people down and sailing is a great release. I've met awesome people and had a fantastic time, I remain very jealous of those who get to stay here on a more permanent basis and wish them good luck with the fall season. I've not partied nor sailed so hard in all my life.

Regatta fees are just about doubling next year. The ICSA is pricing out the smaller teams/universitys and fundraising is becoming an even bigger issue.

This truly is the arsehole of the sailing community hahaha, no offense.
Congratulations; I will be your boss someday.
I would have thought that you have higher career aspirations than being a manager at McDonalds. You disappoint me Wesley.
Job security, there'll always be fat bastards like you and cliffy coming in to pick up a hamburger. ;)

 
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DoRag

Super Anarchist
As far as I can tell Americans care too much for their Grades. As long as you can feed yourself and get on a boat through merit of sailing what does it matter how well school went? I'm currently maintaining a lowly 2.4. While it'd be nice to blame the MCSA for mediocre grades I'm the one who is to blame. College sailing is just to much fun; Getting to the regatta Friday night, partying with everyone, waking early to get stupid cold, sail fast and make left hand turns, Party all night, and Sail some more before going home after a cracking sleep deprived weekend.

Having fun might be too important to me but I'd rather be having fun than sailing a desk in the library all year.

If I'd just stayed in one place all year I think I would have gone absolutely mad. The traveling might not have been cheap, the funding for the club fairly low (seriously if anyone has line for halyards to spare and maybe an FJ to put them on) but we made the most of what we had. College is hard in this country, the constant pressure grinds people down and sailing is a great release. I've met awesome people and had a fantastic time, I remain very jealous of those who get to stay here on a more permanent basis and wish them good luck with the fall season. I've not partied nor sailed so hard in all my life.

Regatta fees are just about doubling next year. The ICSA is pricing out the smaller teams/universitys and fundraising is becoming an even bigger issue.

This truly is the arsehole of the sailing community hahaha, no offense.
Did someone actually write that? This makes NtY look like a Rhodes Scholar.

I wonder how this kid plans to finance his retirement, or raise any kids (in the event his gene pool isn't stopped).

 
1336664054[/url]' post='3707743']
1336658546[/url]' post='3707578']As far as I can tell Americans care too much for their Grades. As long as you can feed yourself and get on a boat through merit of sailing what does it matter how well school went? I'm currently maintaining a lowly 2.4. While it'd be nice to blame the MCSA for mediocre grades I'm the one who is to blame. College sailing is just to much fun; Getting to the regatta Friday night, partying with everyone, waking early to get stupid cold, sail fast and make left hand turns, Party all night, and Sail some more before going home after a cracking sleep deprived weekend.

Having fun might be too important to me but I'd rather be having fun than sailing a desk in the library all year.

If I'd just stayed in one place all year I think I would have gone absolutely mad. The traveling might not have been cheap, the funding for the club fairly low (seriously if anyone has line for halyards to spare and maybe an FJ to put them on) but we made the most of what we had. College is hard in this country, the constant pressure grinds people down and sailing is a great release. I've met awesome people and had a fantastic time, I remain very jealous of those who get to stay here on a more permanent basis and wish them good luck with the fall season. I've not partied nor sailed so hard in all my life.

Regatta fees are just about doubling next year. The ICSA is pricing out the smaller teams/universitys and fundraising is becoming an even bigger issue.

This truly is the arsehole of the sailing community hahaha, no offense.
Did someone actually write that? This makes NtY look like a Rhodes Scholar.

I wonder how this kid plans to finance his retirement, or raise any kids (in the event his gene pool isn't stopped).
If the post was tounge-in-cheek, it was almost clever.

If the post was serious, kitkat is wasting space -- and more.

Given the run-away costs of private colleges and the struggle of public insitutions to maintain academic programs, it is hard to view the financial struggles of college sailing programs or the disparities between the haves and have not schools as serious issues.

Have fun kids but don't forget why you are there.

 

IC43

New member
I sailed in college (all four years) and it was a great way to learn how to manage a tougher schedule while still having a good time. Also, though some college sailors go onto become a waste of space, most of my good friends that sailed in college with me have gone on to demanding careers:

Investment Banking (3)

Hedge Fund (2)

Private Equity (3)

Trading (3)

Law (3)

Currently in Business School (3)

To the best of my knowledge Lee G is employed, but he sailed big boats in college so will give him a pass.

With that said, I would prefer that they all stopped working so I could put my big boat crew back together.

 

Lee G

Super Anarchist
3,323
0
how many people here coming out against college sailing actually sailed in college? If you didnt sail in college, did you take 15credits or 18credits?

I sailed in college (all four years) and it was a great way to learn how to manage a tougher schedule while still having a good time. Also, though some college sailors go onto become a waste of space, most of my good friends that sailed in college with me have gone on to demanding careers:

Investment Banking (3)

Hedge Fund (2)

Private Equity (3)

Trading (3)

Law (3)

Currently in Business School (3)

To the best of my knowledge Lee G is employed, but he sailed big boats in college so will give him a pass.

With that said, I would prefer that they all stopped working so I could put my big boat crew back together.
I did sail in college, however it was well understood that academics came first, and there was absolutely no discussion if you had to miss practice or a regatta for academics. As an engineering major who typically carried 18-20 credits, I definitely missed my fair share. One night a week we did not practice, they were optional boat maintenance days and if you had to study you did.

I'm not taking issue with college sailing in general, what I take issue with are the posters in this thread that have the attitude that sailing/drinking and partying come before academics.

That, and I just kind of feel like being a dick today.... :D

 
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1336669135[/url]' post='3707867']I sailed in college (all four years) and it was a great way to learn how to manage a tougher schedule while still having a good time. Also, though some college sailors go onto become a waste of space, most of my good friends that sailed in college with me have gone on to demanding careers:

Investment Banking (3)

Hedge Fund (2)

Private Equity (3)

Trading (3)

Law (3)

Currently in Business School (3)

To the best of my knowledge Lee G is employed, but he sailed big boats in college so will give him a pass.

With that said, I would prefer that they all stopped working so I could put my big boat crew back together.
While some might debate whether teammates are contributing much to society (where are the engineers, scientists, physicians and entrepreneurs?), their careers are demanding and more power to them.

The point of the apathy about college sailing is a little different. Your friends aren't successful in their chosen careers because they sailed in college or despite the fact they sailed in college. The seeds of their success are self-discipline, intelligence, intellectual curiosity, industry, etc. They would likely be as successful if they had rowed crew, played club soccer, acted in college plays or participated in several IM sports while in school. The corollary is likely also true with respect to the space wasters who are now unemployed or underemployed despite a bachelors degree earned over 5-6 years at a good (or bad) school. They would have squandered their opportunities even if they hadn't sailed.

So, the real question that none of college sailing's supporters have answered is why I as a taxpayer and philanthropist should care about the state of college sailing when colleges and universities have so many other issues?

 

DoRag

Super Anarchist
I'm a member of the Texas A&M Galveston team. We are funded as a varsity sport and receive outside donations. We have a coach, and we practice up to five days a week (depends on what people's class schedule looks like).

College Sailing DOES NOT make you flunk out of school. A sizable portion of our active roster is also honors candidates with a GPA greater than 3.5.

College Sailing DOES NOT mean you drink. ICSA rules, school rules, and team rules state that you're not supposed to. At all. It is college though, and everyone reacts differently and has different experiences.

College Sailing IS important for the sport. The large majority of our team had not sailed competitively or had not sailed AT ALL prior to college.

So I'm supposed to sit in my room and study 24 hours a day with a little sleep and food scattered here and there? School/work first, Sailing second, social life third. That's how we do it, and we're pretty competitive. See y'all in semi-finals...

Now for actual constructive responses here...

More teams need coaches. We're lucky to have a coach, and most schools in SEISA don't have that opportunity. We need more funding. I'm not saying that we need a million dollars, I'm just saying it'd be nice to know that we actually have the money TO TRAVEL to the next regatta. Finally, more SEISA schools have to start interacting with schools in other districts. It's the only way we can size up teams from around the country. TAMUG was lucky enough to get to go to events like Charleston Spring regatta, and our week-long practice over spring break at St. Petersburg. Yeah. That's right. Our team gave up our free time and beaches to go train with other schools.
Well, it appears that you are not one of those "honors students."

And, being an "honors" student, at other than a top tier institution, just doesn't cut it anymore.

 

DoRag

Super Anarchist
Who gets a good paying job straight out of college? College is just prep for graduate school; might as well sail while you're there, and work hard at the skills you need to kick ass on the MCAT/GMAT/LSAT...

Then once you're 200k in the hole, discover you can't stand your chosen profession and become a sailboat racing writer/editor/video producer. Now that's a fucking business plan!
This says it all!

 

DoRag

Super Anarchist
Can I just say that it's astounding to me that people are actually choosing which college they go to for their education based on the merits of the sailing team?

Go where you feel you'll succeed and where you'll be prepared to land a good paying job when you graduate. You have the rest of your life to sail and compete but where you go to school and what you prepare yourself for can make a huge difference as to whether you you're sailng a beat up old laser or your own brand new I-14 that you bought with your bonus check.

My .02.
You know, you are a very good poster (yeah, I know, a kiss of death is a compliment from D'Rag). My guess would be that you will go on to be a great success in whatever career path you choose.

Why is it that you understand the issues and your contemporaries largely do not?

Good on ya, laddie!

WTF?

 

Snaggletooth

Morrelle Compasse
33,005
5,090
As far as I can tell Americans care too much for their Grades. As long as you can feed yourself and get on a boat through merit of sailing what does it matter how well school went? I'm currently maintaining a lowly 2.4. While it'd be nice to blame the MCSA for mediocre grades I'm the one who is to blame. College sailing is just to much fun; Getting to the regatta Friday night, partying with everyone, waking early to get stupid cold, sail fast and make left hand turns, Party all night, and Sail some more before going home after a cracking sleep deprived weekend.

Having fun might be too important to me but I'd rather be having fun than sailing a desk in the library all year.

If I'd just stayed in one place all year I think I would have gone absolutely mad. The traveling might not have been cheap, the funding for the club fairly low (seriously if anyone has line for halyards to spare and maybe an FJ to put them on) but we made the most of what we had. College is hard in this country, the constant pressure grinds people down and sailing is a great release. I've met awesome people and had a fantastic time, I remain very jealous of those who get to stay here on a more permanent basis and wish them good luck with the fall season. I've not partied nor sailed so hard in all my life.

Regatta fees are just about doubling next year. The ICSA is pricing out the smaller teams/universitys and fundraising is becoming an even bigger issue.

This truly is the arsehole of the sailing community hahaha, no offense.
Congratulations; I will be your boss someday.
I would have thought that you have higher career aspirations than being a manager at McDonalds. You disappoint me Wesley.
Job security, there'll always be fat bastards like you and cliffy coming in to pick up a cheesburger ore three. ;)
fixt :)

 

Dswright52

New member
1
0
How about having a boat where a.) you can be competitive as a bigger guy b.) you can actually play with the rig/sail shape throughout a race. C.) have courses long enough that tactics make a difference, instead of Excessive kinetics. ( this is from my mcsa experience so don't hate if things are done differently out on the coasts)

 
Do you really want to say that "you fell in love with sailing through College Sailing?" cough cough..... you were hooked long before college..
I also sail in the MCSA and we have well over 50 people on our team. Out of any given freshman class we take, maybe 4 (maybe) have competitive sailing experience. And a good 50% have never stepped on a boat before. The top crews from this year's senior class had no racing experience and most of them hadn't sailed at all before college. They're all very enthusiastic about the sport and practice as much as anyone else on the team.

But yeah, they were definitely hooked long before college. We don't teach anyone to love the sport. :rolleyes:

On the subject of funding, our team is well off as far as the district goes, but we still spent a good bit more money just on nationals last year than we got from the school. We still have to fundraise more than 90% of our annual budget. We've been fortunate to have a coach for the last few years, but we don't have the budget to make our coaching position a full time job, so they always have to work part-time somewhere else, or leave after a year for a more stable position. So we spend a few months every couple of years on a coaching search also.

I spend on average 2-3 weekends at home once the spring season starts up in March, along with 12+ hours a week at practice, but I wouldn't trade it for the world.

 

psusailing

New member
I was a college sailor in the Pacific Northwest. I loved it and it really set the course for the rest of my life. The Northwest district isn't the biggest or the strongest. It's difficult because most school sailing programs up here are considered a club sport and funded around $2,000 a year. We travel and compete against teams whose coaches are making 20 times that amount. College sailing introduces the sport to lots of new people, most of our team had never sailed before joining. It also teaches great skills like sportsmanship and boat repair. I graduated with a degree in Graphic Design and have been able to us it in the sailing industry to combine my two loves. I was even blessed with the opportunity of designing the 2011 college sailing nationals logo and apparel. I can honestly say that I probably would not be sailing today if it weren't for my college sailing team. The traveling was difficult sometimes but it taught me a lot and took me to some amazing places. College sailors are on the water 3 times a week and every weekend. They rack up more sailing and boat time than anyone I know and are extremely dedicated.

Yes there are some problems with the current system:

-Type of boats (no spinnaker, too expensive)

-Funding

-Travel (what can you really do about this?)

Overall it's a great experience and I learned way more bout life, leadership, sportsmanship, competition and dedication on the water than I did in the classroom.

 

russoreilly

New member
9
0
I was one of the privileged few (or at least a silent minority on this thread) who sailed for a 'powerhouse program.' Sailing for four years in a fully-funded, expertly coached, and very structured program at good academic institution was a great opportunity that was too good to pass up.

Rather than deal with the mechanics of running a team, fundraising, planning, etc. we were able to focus on sailing. The amount of improvement I made over my four years with the program is astounding and will keep me in the sport for the rest of my life.

College sailing is what you make of it. There are lots of opportunities for 'like vs. like' competition regardless of the quality of your program. From the newest and smallest teams to the ones ranked in the top 5 nationally, everyone has the opportunity to get on the water and race more than any other point in their lives. Sure, the boats are dumbed down and slow, but it's the quality of competition that makes the racing what it is. What's wrong with that?

 

Tcatman

Super Anarchist
1,485
135
Chesapeake Bay
Do you really want to say that "you fell in love with sailing through College Sailing?" cough cough..... you were hooked long before college..
I also sail in the MCSA and we have well over 50 people on our team. Out of any given freshman class we take, maybe 4 (maybe) have competitive sailing experience. And a good 50% have never stepped on a boat before. The top crews from this year's senior class had no racing experience and most of them hadn't sailed at all before college. They're all very enthusiastic about the sport and practice as much as anyone else on the team.

But yeah, they were definitely hooked long before college. We don't teach anyone to love the sport. :rolleyes:
Terrific ... but the follow up data on these sailors from the industry and US Sailing suggest that most of those new sailors don't continue with the sport after college... Fact is... they make jokes about helms cruising freshman orientation to find woman who will fit the boat and crew for them...

The real question asked above in this thread of college sailors is... Why should the state or philanthropic donors fund college sailing? Make your case! (Testimonials on how much you personally benefited are nice anecdotes but the students in college radio say the same thing, as do students who study abroad for a semester)

My other question is... Why should the activity be college focused and not yacht club focused?

If College sailing did not exist ... would you participate in a YC's program?

 

kinardly

Super Anarchist
No one's commented on the use of sailing as an entry to a good academic experience. I think many of the parents pushing their kids through my club's junior program are having nightly wet dreams about little Junior or Chelsea getting a ticket to Brown. One senior on my son's high school team told me he made it into Boston College with a 2.3 GPA. 'Course he was a helluva prospect in an FJ and he's making an Olympic Trials bid right now.

 
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