J/111 Goes Sailing...

Kind of hard to see it through the bubble wrap but the fit and finish of the wheel is really quite nice. It is a carbon and glass fiber composite so not as light as a full carbon wheel(like the y-spoke Lewmar or McConaghy)but it is about 1/3 the cost and a J-111 factory option. J-Boats said it was a couple of pounds heavier...works for us!

 

dickie greenleaf

Super Anarchist
Kind of hard to see it through the bubble wrap but the fit and finish of the wheel is really quite nice. It is a carbon and glass fiber composite so not as light as a full carbon wheel(like the y-spoke Lewmar or McConaghy)but it is about 1/3 the cost and a J-111 factory option. J-Boats said it was a couple of pounds heavier...works for us!
McConaghy wheels aren't as expensive as you would think. About twice the expense of Edson, and better looking IMHO. $3,800 shipped to your door from the land down unda.

Boat looks great, and congratulations.

DG

 

Goblew

Member
325
6
Detroit Area
Congrats on #17. I'm looking forward to #25 scheduled to be delivered early April.

What are your commissioning plans? Bottom prep, instruments, etc.?

 
Kind of hard to see it through the bubble wrap but the fit and finish of the wheel is really quite nice. It is a carbon and glass fiber composite so not as light as a full carbon wheel(like the y-spoke Lewmar or McConaghy)but it is about 1/3 the cost and a J-111 factory option. J-Boats said it was a couple of pounds heavier...works for us!
McConaghy wheels aren't as expensive as you would think. About twice the expense of Edson, and better looking IMHO. $3,800 shipped to your door from the land down unda.

Boat looks great, and congratulations.

DG
Hey DG, thanks very much for the note and the info on McConaghy.

I think I mentioned this before (sorry for the repeat) but prior to knowing about J-Boats own(OEM)composite wheel option (which is manufactured by Carbonautica in Slovenia); the only carbon wheel I was able to find pricing on in a 60" diameter was the Lewmar Carbon y-spoke which retails for $5800.00. At that number we were definitely going to opt for the very nice, leather wraped J/111 Edson wheel.

When we learned that J-Boats was offering the composite Carbonautica option at $1950.00 and saw some of the renderings we were in.

Now that we have been able to put our hands on it we're glad we made the decision.

 
Congrats on #17. I'm looking forward to #25 scheduled to be delivered early April.

What are your commissioning plans? Bottom prep, instruments, etc.?
Hey Goblew,

Thanks for the note. Congrats to you on your forthcoming #25!

I'll be happy to give you more detail in a PM if you wish...but here is a high level overview:

We opted for a(moderate)racing bottom which was completed by International Marine(George Borges)in Bristiol RI before transit to SF Bay.

Electronics: B&G h3000; 3ea. 20/20s @ mast, 2ea. GFD's & 1ea. analog AWA @ sea hood; Zeus w sonic [email protected] nav.; AIS.

Wireless network for iPad mobile repeater

Simrad VHF @ Nav, remote at helm

Simrad Auto Pilot

Rigging: Vang change from single line cam release at mast base to two lines lead aft (P & S) to cabintop cam cleats @ cockpit. This change was made to #4 and works much better in our breezy conditions here in SF.

Sails: given a long time relatonship with the local North rep we went with North class sails.

Many options out there; we have recieved a ton of good coaching from our Pro/Broker at Sail California and Rag Bag from this forum who has had us out sailing multiple times on #4 Invisible Hand.

Best of luck!

 

dickie greenleaf

Super Anarchist
Kind of hard to see it through the bubble wrap but the fit and finish of the wheel is really quite nice. It is a carbon and glass fiber composite so not as light as a full carbon wheel(like the y-spoke Lewmar or McConaghy)but it is about 1/3 the cost and a J-111 factory option. J-Boats said it was a couple of pounds heavier...works for us!
McConaghy wheels aren't as expensive as you would think. About twice the expense of Edson, and better looking IMHO. $3,800 shipped to your door from the land down unda.

Boat looks great, and congratulations.

DG
Hey DG, thanks very much for the note and the info on McConaghy.

I think I mentioned this before (sorry for the repeat) but prior to knowing about J-Boats own(OEM)composite wheel option (which is manufactured by Carbonautica in Slovenia); the only carbon wheel I was able to find pricing on in a 60" diameter was the Lewmar Carbon y-spoke which retails for $5800.00. At that number we were definitely going to opt for the very nice, leather wraped J/111 Edson wheel.

When we learned that J-Boats was offering the composite Carbonautica option at $1950.00 and saw some of the renderings we were in.

Now that we have been able to put our hands on it we're glad we made the decision.
I'm a self afflicted wheel aficionado. My wife hopped on a boat with a set of twin carbon fiber wheels and proceeded to say 'now... I get it.'

They look great, and feel even better.

Well done on the new boat, and don't forget to post some pics every now and again....

DG

 

Jono

Super Anarchist
1,169
191
Boat #1 Stella had a good light airs workout over the weekend in the Auckland BMW regatta. I'm told it was in the toughest division and took series line over a well sailed hot rodded Mumm 36 and Elliot 1050. The regatta was sailed on NZ PHRF which is a pure performance based time on time formula. No resemlance to US TOD.

I thought we'd have seen a report as it has been looking good on the water.

 

GregLynn

Member
153
0
How does the J111 rate in PHRF against the Beneteau First 40? I noticed the J111 finished behind one in the Newport to Cabo race which was a relatively light air race for their fleet. I was surprised. I expected the J111 to be a rocket off the wind and much faster than the IRC oriented Beneteau. I would imagine the Beneteau will go to weather better and faster around the buoys but thought it would be smoked on point to point ocean races by the new J.

 

solosailor

Super Anarchist
4,066
816
San Francisco Bay
Thanks Trev. Pretty pleased overall.

LOTS of upwind work. We started Saturday and on Monday afternoon we still were working the Light#1 in <7k or the Code-0. Basically we were water-lined for a majority of the race. In one day of running we made up a lot of ground and if one of the other days were true running we would have stretched. To give you an idea a J/124 rates 24 in Norcal and we rate 36 (the fastest PHRF rated issued for the J/111) and with the ORR rating we owned them time. I didn't find it disappointing to lose to a proven hull design (First 40 = 1st overall Sydney-Hobart) and finish boat for boat with the First 50 in our 36.5ft boat on a majority upwind race.

 

left hook

Super Anarchist
7,473
5
Solosailor/Ragbag. Could you give us some idea of the speeds you were doing downwind in different windspeeds and did the boat tend to stay on her feet when the wind got up? What sails did you use in what windspeeds and how you liked that nifty code zero you have setup.

Also, after doing 700 offshore miles worth of racing in one sitting are there any comments/changes in regards to how the boat is for distance racing? Is it functional an offshore boat or are there modifications you would do before taking it on a distance race again (for instance adding pipe type births or removing the furler, etc).

 
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ragbag

Anarchist
Solosailor/Ragbag. Could you give us some idea of the speeds you were doing downwind in different windspeeds and did the boat tend to stay on her feet when the wind got up? What sails did you use in what windspeeds and how you liked that nifty code zero you have setup.

Also, after doing 700 offshore miles worth of racing in one sitting are there any comments/changes in regards to how the boat is for distance racing? Is it functional an offshore boat or are there modifications you would do before taking it on a distance race again (for instance adding pipe type births or removing the furler, etc).
With six crew, I thought the boat was quite manageable. We slept and ate well. Crew (of 6 total) commented how comfortable the boat was. We used the code zero a lot in light air forward-of-the-beam sailing, worked great. We had stay sail up with the big runner all the time when the breeze was getting past mid teens. We also have a light air #1 head sail that performed very well upwind. The last day when the winds finally became what we were rated for, the sailing was absolutely epic. The boat was continually planing and surfing big waves. We spun out a few times of course, but the boat doesn't broach violently and lay over hard, it is quite easy to get control back. I compared the down hill sailing to deep powder skiing, very gentle, but the boat was like a dog with a bone, it just wanted to go all the time. Our down wind speeds most of the time were in the low- mid teens, peaking at 18. We had the A2 (big runner) up most of the time. We put up the A3 (110 sq. meter) kite when breeze started to push past 25 kts. last night and we were surprised how little speed we sacrificed and the boat was just rock solid in the conditions with that smaller kite. We made up huge the last day on the fleet, we were only a good hour out of second overall which we would have made up had the race lasted a few hours longer. It was very apparent from post race chatter that none of this went unnoticed.

 
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left hook

Super Anarchist
7,473
5
Solosailor/Ragbag. Could you give us some idea of the speeds you were doing downwind in different windspeeds and did the boat tend to stay on her feet when the wind got up? What sails did you use in what windspeeds and how you liked that nifty code zero you have setup.

Also, after doing 700 offshore miles worth of racing in one sitting are there any comments/changes in regards to how the boat is for distance racing? Is it functional an offshore boat or are there modifications you would do before taking it on a distance race again (for instance adding pipe type births or removing the furler, etc).
With six crew, I thought the boat was quite manageable. We slept and ate well. Crew (of 6 total) commented how comfortable the boat was. We used the code zero a lot in light air forward-of-the-beam sailing, worked great. We had stay sail up with the big runner all the time when the breeze was getting past mid teens. We also have a light air #1 head sail that performed very well upwind. The last day when the winds finally became what we were rated for, the sailing was absolutely epic. The boat was continually planing and surfing big waves. We spun out a few times of course, but the boat doesn't broach violently and lay over hard, it is quite easy to get control back. I compared the down hill sailing to deep powder skiing, very gentle, but the boat was like a dog with a bone, it just wanted to go all the time. Our down wind speeds most of the time were in the low- mid teens, peaking at 18. We had the A2 (big runner) up most of the time. We put up the A3 (110 sq. meter) kite when breeze started to push past 25 kts. last night and we were surprised how little speed we sacrificed and the boat was just rock solid in the conditions with that smaller kite. We made up huge the last day on the fleet, we were only a good hour out of second overall which we would have made up had the race lasted a few hours longer. It was very apparent from post race chatter that none of this went unnoticed.
Thanks very much, sounds like the boat will be a real dream in a blow. That said I have a followup question for you. How did the boat feel/perform in the light stuff and what sorts of numbers were you seeing in those conditions?

Also I'm glad to hear that the Code Zero worked out for you. Miracle sails aren't they?

 

ragbag

Anarchist
Thanks very much, sounds like the boat will be a real dream in a blow. That said I have a followup question for you. How did the boat feel/perform in the light stuff and what sorts of numbers were you seeing in those conditions?

Also I'm glad to hear that the Code Zero worked out for you. Miracle sails aren't they?
The boat needs a code zero as it does not have a genoa (non-verlapping head sail rig). In light air, we would be sailing at 80-90% of wind speed most of the time. The code zero would sometimes push boat speed past wind speed. Even though we lacked water line in this race, we moved well for our length when the wind was forward of the beam. We sailed into Cedros Bay, anticipating pressure to die on us on the outside as was the forecast. Big mistake, most boats passed us on the outside until we clawed our way out of the bay. The last 24 hours we had great down wind pressure, and made up a lot of our earlier losses on the fleet.

 

opusone

Anarchist
889
1
Thanks very much, sounds like the boat will be a real dream in a blow. That said I have a followup question for you. How did the boat feel/perform in the light stuff and what sorts of numbers were you seeing in those conditions?

Also I'm glad to hear that the Code Zero worked out for you. Miracle sails aren't they?
The boat needs a code zero as it does not have a genoa (non-verlapping head sail rig). In light air, we would be sailing at 80-90% of wind speed most of the time. The code zero would sometimes push boat speed past wind speed. Even though we lacked water line in this race, we moved well for our length when the wind was forward of the beam. We sailed into Cedros Bay, anticipating pressure to die on us on the outside as was the forecast. Big mistake, most boats passed us on the outside until we clawed our way out of the bay. The last 24 hours we had great down wind pressure, and made up a lot of our earlier losses on the fleet.
any video from the cabo race?

opusone

 

pjrs

Member
496
0
Ragbag - belated congrats on the result, the last days sailing sounds like a blast - what I reckon the boat was made for.

Out of geeky interest - the UK 111, has a purchase (6:1 from a quick glimpse) rigged on the inboard end of the pole out line. It's mounted on the forward internal bulkhead, the idea being to increase the outward force of the pole against the bobstay and stabilise the pole for the code 0 luff tension - have you guys done this? How did you find the pole bend/luff tension?

 

solosailor

Super Anarchist
4,066
816
San Francisco Bay
Out of geeky interest - the UK 111, has a purchase (6:1 from a quick glimpse) rigged on the inboard end of the pole out line. It's mounted on the forward internal bulkhead, the idea being to increase the outward force of the pole against the bobstay and stabilise the pole for the code 0 luff tension - have you guys done this? How did you find the pole bend/luff tension? ?
We have a purpose build Code-0 Prod since the pole does not allow for a centered tack until fully deployed which is to long.
 

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