Jack lines

us7070

Super Anarchist
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that guy in the video argues that he prefers simple, non-locking, hooks because they are easier and faster to use.., which is fine.., but they are not legal under the offshore special regs for any class of race

 

hdra

Anarchist
632
139
We've made ours with 1/4" dyneema inside tubular webbing - found the webbing color does fade, so have had to replace it after about two years to keep things looking good, but the dyneema doesn't show any of the signs of wear/UV fading that it does when uncovered.  Doesn't roll underfoot, super strong, only thing that sucks is feeding 65' of dyneema through the tubular webbing - takes some dock space and patience.

 

sshow bob

Super Anarchist
2,352
297
Maine
There was a thread somewhere in which someone (Evans, I think) talked about making spliced eyes in the dyneema line with webbing cover.  Does anyone remember where that was?  My google-foo is weak today.

 

silent bob

Super Anarchist
8,577
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New Jersey
There was a thread somewhere in which someone (Evans, I think) talked about making spliced eyes in the dyneema line with webbing cover.  Does anyone remember where that was?  My google-foo is weak today.
Evans shut down his page a while ago.  Too bad, it was full of great info.

 

sshow bob

Super Anarchist
2,352
297
Maine
For those interested:

Originally Posted by Delancey 
Hi Evans,

For our purposes the jacklines are for a delivery and will not likely be permanently rigged. I am at a bit of a loss to imagine the type of webbing cover/ single braid core splice you allude to except where the cover isn't actually spliced, but maybe hand sewn over the top of the loop?

It is essentially just like a 'core to core' splice, where the loop is covered but the cover is (usually) not buried (it is sewn/whipped down). To make it happen with webbing . . . . #1 you pull the tail out of a small hole in the webbing about 2" from the end of the webbing, #2 you pull a loop of the cord out of another small hole in the webbing where you want the base of the final loop, #3 you bury the end of the cord into the loop you have pulled out, #4 you pull the loop of cord back into the webbing. This pulls the two pieces of webbing together, forming the end loop you wanted. #5 you sew the webbing together for about 3" (2" after the splice/join and 1" before)

Maybe our needs would be met with exposed loops and the webbing covering the remainder, sewn in place as I suggested? Or maybe the simplest approach of extending the webbing the full length of the core and knotting would work?

The webbing around the loop is for UV and wear protection. If the jackline is not going to see months of UV/use then you can simply have the dyneema loops extend out the ends of the webbing and be uncovered. Because the loops are 'double strength' they can in fact loose a lot of strength without effecting the system strength. But if they are going to see a lot of UV or wear then covering them is just good practice and not that difficult.

Your feedback is always appreciated. Thanks!

I will be losing my internet this afternoon. Not sure when I will get a connection back.
 
Source
 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,261
5,186
Canada
Use polyester webbing, not nylon

Soak the webbing  in a bucket of seawater for 10 minutes right before installation. Otherwise when it gets wet, it gets loose otherwise. When it dries it becomes tighter with a pre-soak.

Put a few twists in the webbing as you install. Prevents it from thrumming in the wind.

Take it off when you're not sailing to prevent UV damage.

Use a few wraps on a a cleat because webbing can be a bit slippery

End it at the front of the cockpit so you don't slide of the end or over the transom

If you buy bulk webbing, inspect it as it comes off the roll because sometimes manufacturers will put a join in the roll with a piece of tape connecting the ends (they assume people buying bulk webbing are only buying a few feet at a time)

And finally - just assume the edge of the deck is like a 2000' cliff and treat it that way in your mind. The lifelines and jacklines are just a last chance if you make a bad mistake. Move on deck like the ocean is trying to kill you. Because it is.

 

Crash

Super Anarchist
5,014
965
SoCal
And finally - just assume the edge of the deck is like a 2000' cliff and treat it that way in your mind. The lifelines and jacklines are just a last chance if you make a bad mistake. Move on deck like the ocean is trying to kill you. Because it is.
This!

 
I think someone mentioned above, but having good attachment points, where you will be working is important.  The A to B for jacklines is a safety but thought of as in transit.  At the mast or masts bow and cockpit we have something easy and close that can be clipped into.  At this point when you are working it's most likely two hands and your focus is not on transit like when moving forward or aft. Something we are grossly negligent on has been safety drills etc.  Using the harness for retrieval, Man overoard drills etc.  I have to drill all the time on the ship and muscle memory is very crucial. In most cases  people will default to their highest level of training in a crisis. A small portion will become imobalized and a small portion will not be effected at all, but the vast majority go into default training mode. 

 

PatsyQPatsy

Anarchist
631
30
Naptown
45 footer I find myself on often has a nice setup for a jack line IN the cockpit too.   One line stretched down the port side floor to the back corner then stretched across the back of the cockpit and finally forward on starboard.  Especially nice if your climbing aft of a big wheel.  30 footer might not need it, but I find it very convenient.  

 

Not My Real Name

Not Actually Me
42,928
2,767
I think someone mentioned above, but having good attachment points, where you will be working is important.  The A to B for jacklines is a safety but thought of as in transit.  At the mast or masts bow and cockpit we have something easy and close that can be clipped into.  At this point when you are working it's most likely two hands and your focus is not on transit like when moving forward or aft. Something we are grossly negligent on has been safety drills etc.  Using the harness for retrieval, Man overoard drills etc.  I have to drill all the time on the ship and muscle memory is very crucial. In most cases  people will default to their highest level of training in a crisis. A small portion will become imobalized and a small portion will not be effected at all, but the vast majority go into default training mode. 
Yeah, I'll usually connect to something else while working, both if they reach. A shroud, cleat, taught line, stanchion, etc.

 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
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worldwide
Rig them so it's next to impossible to go overboard. Boarding a moving boat from the end of a tether while you're being dragged through the water is so much harder than you can imagine.
Best to keep all jack lines as close to centerline as possible 

jack lines along the toe rail are man killers 

 

El Borracho

Sam’s friend
6,430
2,447
Pacific Rim
Best to keep all jack lines as close to centerline as possible .
I removed my dodger so I could run a single jackline in the middle of the deck. Direct from the steering pedestal base, past the mast, to a mid-foredeck padeye. One of the best offshore things I did. Going around the old dodger on the side decks was the most dubious part of going forward.

Interesting that sailors are using Dyneema jacklines. I rather like the bright yellow webbing because I’d hate to clip into the wrong line when things get sporty. 

 

Coolerking

Member
436
38
LBC
Make sure you can clip in before you go on deck, ideally even before you open the hatch.

Trust me, it's real important.

 
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Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,586
2,877
Edgewater, MD
Cristoforo said:
Yes you will find similar points made in that video's comments.  A problem with novices like Sailing Uma and Sailing La Vag and other Youtubeers  is the specific safety videos they put out  are full of errors and bad ideas based on their unproven theories and lack of experience.  I prefer not to choose and rely on a piece of safety equipment that is meant to save my life  if it is ever needed,  on the basis it may save me $50 if I can stitch one up myself with Walmart webbing and non locking carabiners. Some things are better left to the pros. 
I disagree that sailors cannot fabricate their own safety equipment. That's basically what you're saying.

If you buy the proper materials, and stitch them properly, they can be as safe as commercially made equipment. Evans Starzinger sewed me up a set of custom jacklines for my Pearson 30. They were everybit as good as the "pro made" lines I bought for my Tartan, later on.

I'm not saying that Sailing Uma has all the answers but they have been sailing for years now and have safely crossed the Atlantic.  Yes, they sailed without lifelines for quite awhile, which I disagreed with.

 
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