Jim Brown Searunners

Dennisail

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unShirley

Super Anarchist
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Ventura
IMHO

excerpt from second ad:

"These trimarans have proven to be very good seaworthy boats and are excellent cruisers"

This is one time that ad copy is actually accurate.

Searunner 37 is a very old design (1960s? 70s?), but in it's day was considered state of the art.

Scores have been built all over the world and scores have made passages all over the world. For a 40+ year old design they are pretty fast, sail well, and if built right, very seaworthy. A well proven craft. Jim Brown is well respected in the multihull design arena.

 

Dennisail

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Is a tri like the 40 mentioned worth say 80k if all in good condition and no rot? It still has original sails but new rigging and the rest presents in good condition.

 
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hobie17li

Anarchist
586
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Jim Brown's Searunners were designed for home builders with a

very good building manual. Sheet ply construction, glass taped chines,

center cockpit cutter rig, centerboard with mini keel. a few friends built

his designs when i was building my Bucc 33 in 70s. John Marples also

sold plans and continued searunner theme. sailed well, good cruiser

get it surveyed and test sail

 

Dennisail

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Well they can tell me how fucked it is. Which I have a sort of idea already. I wouldn't trust them to tell me how much it is worth. Seems most boats these days have selling for a ridiculous amount under the value they were surveyed for. I would get it checked out for piece of mind, but that is after I have come to an agreement on price. But I can figure out a value. There is hardly anything to compare it too and I have been trying. All I know is boats overseas go for a lot less money.

 

Roy Miles

New member
Hello out there. I have a Searunner 40, which I built and launched in 1978 (sail number 68). I'm in the last year of a complete overhaul of the boat and preparing to go cruising full time in one year. My boat was one of the first West System boats, and I've done a number of innovations to this boat. If there is anyone still out there with questions, I'm happy to offer some of my observations and experience.

 

phillysailor

Super Anarchist
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Hello out there. I have a Searunner 40, which I built and launched in 1978 (sail number 68). I'm in the last year of a complete overhaul of the boat and preparing to go cruising full time in one year. My boat was one of the first West System boats, and I've done a number of innovations to this boat. If there is anyone still out there with questions, I'm happy to offer some of my observations and experience.
Could you please post some details and photos? That would be greatly appreciated!

 
Hello out there. I have a Searunner 40, which I built and launched in 1978 (sail number 68). I'm in the last year of a complete overhaul of the boat and preparing to go cruising full time in one year. My boat was one of the first West System boats, and I've done a number of innovations to this boat. If there is anyone still out there with questions, I'm happy to offer some of my observations and experience.
Hi Roy my very first offshore passage was on a Searunner 40 from Hawaii to Vancouver. I think I was about 25. Long time ago! Awesome boat awesome trip. PM me if you are interested in a couple of new Harken 35ST winches, too big for my boat.Wayne

 

ProaSailor

dreaming my life away...
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Jim Brown's Searunners were designed for home builders with a

very good building manual. Sheet ply construction, glass taped chines,

center cockpit cutter rig, centerboard with mini keel. a few friends built

his designs when i was building my Bucc 33 in 70s. John Marples also

sold plans and continued searunner theme. sailed well, good cruiser

get it surveyed and test sail

Hello out there. I have a Searunner 40, which I built and launched in 1978 (sail number 68). I'm in the last year of a complete overhaul of the boat and preparing to go cruising full time in one year. My boat was one of the first West System boats, and I've done a number of innovations to this boat. If there is anyone still out there with questions, I'm happy to offer some of my observations and experience.
Two thumbs up! I have sailed a Searunner 40 from Half Moon Bay to San Francisco, ~25 miles north day sail. Good boat!

 

Roy Miles

New member
D Wayne G, I'm planning on replacing my halyard winches with 35STAs. Can you send some pics and age of them?

As for details on my boat, I'm happy to oblige. I built my boat in Venice, California, across the street from Marina del Rey. I launched it in 1978 and immediately moved to San Diego, where I, fortunately, found an end-tie in Harbor Island. Not many multihulls in those days. It was great fun overtaking the "leaners", watching them look over their shoulders and (probably) whisper, "Watch this, these trimarans can't go to weather", as they tightened up their sheets. Then, as we streaked by to weather of them, they would tack away and not look back. I guess that apparent wind was a new concept for them in those days.

Since then, I have replaced the engine (500# Volvo MD2B that shook the fillings out of your teeth) with a Yanmar 3GM30F (300#, sounds like a sewing machine), replaced the entire electrical system (from 6 circuit breakers and 250 AH of batteries to 16 DC breakers, 740 AH of house bank, and a 2k watt inverter, and 21st century wiring), am just completing a custom 6 cubic foot reefer (and about to start the building of the equally sized freezer, all using vacuum insulated panels), built a state of the art centerboard, going from 300+ pounds to just over 100), about to commence construction of the hard dodger followed by repainting the upper portion of the boat to the sheer line, and currently discussing the new rig and sails with local vendors.

I have also done some other trick stuff. I am replacing all my floorboards with honeycomb and aluminum stringers, thus replacing the weight I incurred with the freezer, reefer and compressor/motor, with ultra light weight soles. The galley stove is waiting for a new valve and insulation. It was, formerly, a Force 10 4-burner which, with the help of a hot-rod builder friend and an HVAC artist, has now been converted into the only marine eye-level oven stove in the world. The old RV stoves I used to use all died prematurely from the hot seawater from boiling pasta. I will be installing a permanent roller system to store the RIB (with 15 HP Lehr propane engine) on the port quarter deck, and building a boarding ladder/dive platform for the starboard quarter.

Since I have made my living, these past years, as a shipwright and marine installer, I have some pretty cool electronics, including forward scanning sonar. All of this in prep for leaving next summer for the first round of passages around the Pacific, always returning to my end tie at Southwestern Yacht Club in San Diego. I'll send pics later.

 

Roy Miles

New member
Here are some pics: First is Bob Dixon holding new composite centerboard on top of bathroom scale (<100#). Second is the cockpit electrical panel and engine instruments. Third is epoxy/plywood fuel tank, 30 years old. This appears to be the max number of pics per message.

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Roy Miles

New member
Here are some more: Flying three hulls, portrait shot, house bank (4 L-16 6-volt batteries, 740 AH) with platinum catalyst vents, forward scanning sonar, fishfinder transducers, floorboard stringers (with honeycomb, glassed, beneath), floorboards glassed.

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Dennisail

Anarchist
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Brisbane
Hmm since then I cruised a 40 foot mono from the USA to AU with my GF. Purchased a 43 foot Crowther cat. Watched my children grow up and go through UNI.. ok last bit was BS. I dont even have kids.

Still cool hearing about the searunner though. I dont mind my old thread bump.

 




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