Log Rollin'

I'm so glad it wasn't just me that noticed... as soon as I clicked on the link, the hot bikini babe was the first damned thing I noticed... click on the link to other pics, and her ass gets even better! Damn, I must be getting older and more perverted.

 

Boatzilla

Member
299
12
PNW
No shit! Photos by Tim and Kristen Mangus:

1b.JPG

2b.JPG

 

Hobie Dog

Super Anarchist
2,862
14
Chesapeake Bay
Oh and yes AFA the bikini action, the coed ratio on these boats tends to be better than on a "normal" racing boat.

However besides the one hottie; this one appears to be a sausage fest...

 

big chicken

Super Anarchist
1,715
0
I'm on a boat
Oh and yes AFA the bikini action, the coed ratio on these boats tends to be better than on a "normal" racing boat.
However besides the one hottie; this one appears to be a sausage fest...
Perhaps you should take another look at the one in the PFD sitting on the hull. Not saying she's in a league with the bikini babe, but I'll bet she shares similar chromosomes.

 

Hobie Dog

Super Anarchist
2,862
14
Chesapeake Bay
Oh and yes AFA the bikini action, the coed ratio on these boats tends to be better than on a "normal" racing boat.
However besides the one hottie; this one appears to be a sausage fest...
Perhaps you should take another look at the one in the PFD sitting on the hull. Not saying she's in a league with the bikini babe, but I'll bet she shares similar chromosomes.
Whoops stand corrected on that one, those goofy crew shirts threw me off. Notice our bikini babe will have none of that business... :lol:

 

tprice

Anarchist
618
1
Chesapeake
I sail on them somethimes and it is a hoot. They will just roll over at anytime (sails up or not) but have a weird, very slow roll period with their heavy, tall spars. The crew instinctively adopts a mass sway balance routine.

Anyway, a newcomer to the boats is told a few things.

"step in the middle" (obviously)

"if we capsize, come up (from the water) with your hands above your head" (so the falling board hits you on the arms, not your noggin)

"Hold on to the board" (to keep it from falling on someone) - you can see one of the guys doing this in a picture

"Boardmen rule" (Boardmen have a big job to shift those 16' boards on the tack so stay out of their way) (The large Boardmen perch out on the end of the board. Lesser girthed crew moves in and out on the boards to balance as the wind dictates. Fine tuning, as it were. Hence their name "squelchers" (as in adjusting the squelch)

"don't bounce" (when you move out on the board, don't bounce it - the Boardman is perched out there on an 8" wide plank!)

"where's the hammer?" (several rusty hammers are about the extent of the toolkit - to pound out mast pins, chocks, make small tuning adjustments)

These aren't babied boats. They are elegant and ancient (most fom the late 1800s and early 1900's) with varnish, carved longheads, modern foils, Harken blocks, travellers, high tech lines, etc. A dichotomy of tradition and race. They regularly entangle with each other with "stock car" race type contact. They race them hard and have their own handicap system.

 

TimFordi550#87

Tim Fordi550-#87
I sail on them somethimes and it is a hoot. They will just roll over at anytime (sails up or not) but have a weird, very slow roll period with their heavy, tall spars. The crew instinctively adopts a mass sway balance routine.Anyway, a newcomer to the boats is told a few things.

"step in the middle" (obviously)

"if we capsize, come up (from the water) with your hands above your head" (so the falling board hits you on the arms, not your noggin)

"Hold on to the board" (to keep it from falling on someone) - you can see one of the guys doing this in a picture

"Boardmen rule" (Boardmen have a big job to shift those 16' boards on the tack so stay out of their way) (The large Boardmen perch out on the end of the board. Lesser girthed crew moves in and out on the boards to balance as the wind dictates. Fine tuning, as it were. Hence their name "squelchers" (as in adjusting the squelch)

"don't bounce" (when you move out on the board, don't bounce it - the Boardman is perched out there on an 8" wide plank!)

"where's the hammer?" (several rusty hammers are about the extent of the toolkit - to pound out mast pins, chocks, make small tuning adjustments)

These aren't babied boats. They are elegant and ancient (most fom the late 1800s and early 1900's) with varnish, carved longheads, modern foils, Harken blocks, travellers, high tech lines, etc. A dichotomy of tradition and race. They regularly entangle with each other with "stock car" race type contact. They race them hard and have their own handicap system.
in 2 paragraphs you've answered more questions and given more info on these things than every g.d. article I've ever read on them in the past 40 yrs. Is there some sort of "code of silence" about

sailing these beasts?

 




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