Looking Forward to the Invention of Cleats on Sailboats

Shu

Super Anarchist
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A little background: I rent keelboats so I can sail with my wife and otherwise have a relaxing time on a sailboat with friends, which is not possible on my I-14.

On a little Capri 22 last weekend, the main halyard cleat was one of those funky camming type cleats that sort of resembles a clutch. You pull down sharply on it to rotate the cleat with respect to its base to lock, and pull up sharply to release. It worked fine until it decided I was trying to put too much leech tension on the main and it spontaneously released about 18" of halyard. A standard horn cleat would have been nice as a back up, or even as the only cleat. The outhaul was led through a captive-type clam cleat, which was plastic and had been worn smooth enough to give no grip at all. The staff had tied an enormous stopper knot in the end of the outhaul that gave it one setting - eased, appropriate for reaching only. Again a simple horn cleat would have been wonderful. Next time, I'm coming armed with some bits of line to jury rig some solutions.

And here is a thread hijack in the opening post:

I think the rental places are determined to embarrass the self-respecting sailor: Some have massive advertisements on the mainsail, complete with phone number. I was happy to see the boat we rented had a plain white Dacron main, sans advertisement, but horror of horrors, the ball fenders were spliced to the stanchion bases :eek: . The best we could do was store them on deck. :angry:

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never was a fan of those. In theory they can be easier to free up than a regular cleat. They can also be effective in an auto-release set-up where you put some splicing twine through a hole in the release cam that can be trigger by some act. I think some of the cats like F18's use that for their tackline cleat.

 

IStream

Super Anarchist
10,865
3,047
I put one of those on a little daysailer I had. They only really work well if the lead of the line is downward as it exits the front of clutch even when you're yanking on the line. As soon as you cross the horizontal plane, it's too easy to accidentally trip the clutch.

 
There are good rental companies, and there are ones that don't take care of their boats. I think most fall into the latter, I figure it's part and parcel with rental boats. So is the part where you pull up to the dock, hand over the line, and walk away.

Me, I'm antisocial, so I like having the big green 'Seaforth stripe' on the sail, the other boats stay away. Sometimes I let the fenders hang for the same reason. It's a daysail, not a race.

I also get to occasionally borrow 'The Muff'. This is a 26 footer with a mustache on the front, a stuffed pirate on the backstay, and may be towing an inflatable shark. The guy that owns it (and the women he brings on board) have more fun than the rest of the fleet put together. You don't get critical of sail trim on a boat like that.

 

Shu

Super Anarchist
1,717
96
Good perspective Kirwan. Maybe I should learn to just learn to leave my ego at home.

 

Dan33

Super Anarchist
I love those Spinlock cleats and have several on my boat, including the mainsheet. I have tortured that mainsheet cleat for 5 years and it has never given me 10 seconds of grief. I can release it with a sick snap of the line and lock it with another simple snap. My main trimmer has threatened to take it with her if she ever leaves.

Also use them for the backstay tensioner and the furling control line.

 




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