Mainsail track to main attachment

I recently sailed on a Hanse 400 from Southport Ct to Bermuda. The last 18 hours we had 32 to 36 knots gusting 42 to 45 knots. We sailed with a double reef (40% reduced main) and a very small amount of jib. The boat handled very well in the seas in wind on autopilot. However, when we got to Bermuda and dropped the main in the dark I noticed several of the sail attachments to the track cars were busted. When I checked in the light after we were anchored I found five busted. What had been used was 3/16" bungy cord wrapped 4 times thru the sail and car and then tied off. When I asked the owned why had bungy cord been used he said that is what the sail maker had said to use. What are your thoughts? I am just glad it did not come completely loose from the track in those winds.
 

Jethrow

Super Anarchist
I guess I can see what they were trying to achieve with the bungy, give the attachment a bit of load releasing give, but it's not common.

Most cars would be webbed on (strong) or plastic shackles (cheaper).
 

Frank White

Member
221
91
Bungee is becoming more common for mainsail slides. First noticed it a few years ago on cruising catamarans. I seem to recall it being spectra reinforced bungee, is there even such a thing? I always assumed it was to do with being able to pull the bulk of the sail back in order to minimize the stack height of the mainsail against the mast? I always wondered about the strength and longevity of it though? Sounds like you found the limit. I would definitely go with webbing between the sail and the cars going forward.
 

tane

Anarchist
953
275
webbing is a PIA when changing a busted slide. Plastic shackles! (except headboard!)
 

DDW

Super Anarchist
6,711
1,242
The last sailmaker went to bungie on the intermediates on my sail (full battened sail. This was mainly to relieve tension on the intermediate just above the reef point, which overstressed the laminate a couple of times. With a full battened sail, very little stress on the intermediates most of the time. My new sail has a different idea which seem to work better: the intermediates are held by a loop of cord that is pulled through a grommet and fastened above and below the grommet. When there is no luff tension on that part of the sail (because it is furled or below the reef) the luff gathers some slack, the cord goes slack, and relieves the stress. Seems to work very well, without resorting to bungie.
 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
7,102
1,469
worldwide
I recently sailed on a Hanse 400 from Southport Ct to Bermuda. The last 18 hours we had 32 to 36 knots gusting 42 to 45 knots. We sailed with a double reef (40% reduced main) and a very small amount of jib. The boat handled very well in the seas in wind on autopilot. However, when we got to Bermuda and dropped the main in the dark I noticed several of the sail attachments to the track cars were busted. When I checked in the light after we were anchored I found five busted. What had been used was 3/16" bungy cord wrapped 4 times thru the sail and car and then tied off. When I asked the owned why had bungy cord been used he said that is what the sail maker had said to use. What are your thoughts? I am just glad it did not come completely loose from the track in those winds.
A verbal description is gibberish

take then post a photo of the failed attachment

include a picture of your reef tack handling method

when properly installed luff systems last a long time
 




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