"Marine Grade"

12 metre

Super Anarchist
3,933
733
English Bay
300 series SS (austenitic) is non-magnetic - but only when freshly formed. After cold working or stamping they become magnetic, or at least weakly magnetic as I think they like to call it. 304 more so than 316. I just noticed Autonomous said the same thing.

400 series SS (martensetic) is magnetic and tends to have greater wear resistance.

A final note Stain "Less" Steel is a better description. A friend had all his 304 standing rigging replaced for a trip to Hawaii. Upon return a few months later the shrouds were covered in rust and the topsides were rust stained. 316 is better than 304 as far as corrosion resistance.

He also had to have the SS chainplates replaced prior to his trip as they were encapsulated in resin and had suffered crevice corrosion.
 

CaptainAhab

Anarchist
844
230
South Australia
Just to be clear there is actual stainless steel that is magnetic...the typical 300 series materials are mostly non magnetic
About 6 or 7 years ago in AU we started getting 302 stainless construction(decking, self tappers, batten screws). They are magnetic and rust very quickly in our seaside area. Interestingly, there is no rhyme or reason. It's not just the brand(one in particular), it's the sizes. If you are buying boxes of decking screws some are labeled 304, 316 or now 302.

Unfortunately here in AU it can be a challenge to get 316 fasteners. Sometimes we have to go with 304. They don't seem to do to bad on the boats.

In the States, the hardware stores sell 18-8 stainless(???). That shite will rust in your shower.
 

El Borracho

Verified User
6,660
2,635
Pacific Rim
With stainless steel it is not only the alloy description that determines rusting and magnetic properties. The entire fabrication process must be designed to preserve those properties. Finish and passivation is key to rust prevention.

As to “Marine Grade”? That there is a perfect marketing department created slogan: Meaningless specification-free glam words.
 

Fleetwood

Member
211
58
Sydney, Oz
About 6 or 7 years ago in AU we started getting 302 stainless construction(decking, self tappers, batten screws). They are magnetic and rust very quickly in our seaside area. Interestingly, there is no rhyme or reason. It's not just the brand(one in particular), it's the sizes. If you are buying boxes of decking screws some are labeled 304, 316 or now 302.

Unfortunately here in AU it can be a challenge to get 316 fasteners. Sometimes we have to go with 304. They don't seem to do to bad on the boats.

In the States, the hardware stores sell 18-8 stainless(???). That shite will rust in your shower.
Quality from Bunnings, etc can be highly variable but I've had no problems with industrial suppliers which sell a full range of SS - 304, 316, etc.
 

CaptainAhab

Anarchist
844
230
South Australia
Quality from Bunnings, etc can be highly variable but I've had no problems with industrial suppliers which sell a full range of SS - 304, 316, etc.
I agree. I was simply pointing out that there are 300 series (austenitic) stainless in the wild that does rust. The typical brand is Zenith. Read the labels.
 
McMaster-Carr has all kinds of fasteners, plastics, hoses, composites.
Online Metals has the obvious.
The local Ace Hardware is my source for stainless fasteners (preferably 316 but 304 will do), abrasives, various paint solvents, brushes and other paint sundries.
Home Depot has small tools, abrasives, sealants.
Real paint shop has Shark Grip, a plastic nonskid grit.
The local NAPA has reinforced rubber hose, but not for exhaust, sanitation or suction.
Yard goods shop has nylon taffeta for peel-ply.

In New England, my go-to marine suppliers are Defender, Hamilton Marine, Jamestown Distributors and R&W Rope.

West Marine is my favorite source for “Surrender the Booty” t-shirts and nothing else.
 

10thTonner

Hazard to Navigation
1,623
582
South of Spandau
Guy at the shop told me to use the good harken grease for the winches instead of the cheap stuff from the bike shop. IDK if he ripped me off. In the end it was about EUR 19 instead of 7 so I did it. I’ve wasted several orders of magnitude more on boat stuff than that. <:)
 

Autonomous

Turgid Member
4,247
1,424
PNW
Renamed oil and grease is a big thing.
A famous old head bicycle guy puts his name on chainsaw bar oil an charges 10X+.
On the other hand the wrong lubes can be expensive too.
 

ryley

Super Anarchist
5,501
656
Boston, MA
C_F, I generally don't use big box store wire for boat jobs, or their crimp fasteners. I don't use their hose often because in general it's not *quite* the same diameter as the marine stuff. bottom paint is hard to find at homeboy depot, but krylon's not. most of the epoxies aren't so great but the foam rollers and paint trays are.
 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
6,098
1,182
worldwide
C_F, I generally don't use big box store wire for boat jobs, or their crimp fasteners. I don't use their hose often because in general it's not *quite* the same diameter as the marine stuff. bottom paint is hard to find at homeboy depot, but krylon's not. most of the epoxies aren't so great but the foam rollers and paint trays are.
The modern curse is that high quality waterfront marine stores , that previously served the professional marine industry, have all gone under… high rent , Amazon

These shops stocked the correct boat supplies
 

LionessRacing

Super Anarchist
4,351
591
Myrtle Beach,
Note:
Steels contain some fraction of Carbon, without it, it's just iron.
Higher Carbon content tends to be harder due to internal stresses, depending on the thermal treatments.
You can learn more here or here which gives this:

"

High-alloy Steels​

For the most part, we're talking about stainless steel here, the most important commercial high-alloy steel. Stainless steels are at least 12 percent chromium and many have high nickel contents. The three basic types of stainless are:

  1. Austenitic
  2. Ferritic
  3. Martensitic
Martensitic stainless steels make up the cutlery grades. They have the least amount of chromium, offer high hardenability, and require both pre- and postheating when welding to prevent cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ).

Ferritic stainless steels have 12 to 27 percent chromium with small amounts of austenite-forming alloys.

Austenitic stainless steels offer excellent weldability, but austenite isn't stable at room temperature. Consequently, specific alloys must be added to stabilize austenite. The most important austenite stabilizer is nickel, and others include carbon, manganese, and nitrogen.

Special properties, including corrosion resistance, oxidation resistance, and strength at high temperatures, can be incorporated into austenitic stainless steels by adding certain alloys like chromium, nickel, molybdenum, nitrogen, titanium, and columbium. And while carbon can add strength at high temperatures, it can also reduce corrosion resistance by forming a compound with chromium. It's important to note that austenitic alloys can't be hardened by heat treatment. That means they don't harden in the welding HAZ."
1661806697082.png
 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
6,098
1,182
worldwide
McMaster-Carr has all kinds of fasteners, plastics, hoses, composites.
Online Metals has the obvious.
The local Ace Hardware is my source for stainless fasteners (preferably 316 but 304 will do), abrasives, various paint solvents, brushes and other paint sundries.
Home Depot has small tools, abrasives, sealants.
Real paint shop has Shark Grip, a plastic nonskid grit.
The local NAPA has reinforced rubber hose, but not for exhaust, sanitation or suction.
Yard goods shop has nylon taffeta for peel-ply.

In New England, my go-to marine suppliers are Defender, Hamilton Marine, Jamestown Distributors and R&W Rope.

West Marine is my favorite source for “Surrender the Booty” t-shirts and nothing else.
If you must perform maintenance tasks via online suppliers you are forced to live in a frustrating, go slow word
 

Blue Crab

benthivore
16,155
2,598
Outer Banks
Sorry, I was giving you the benefit of the doubt Ma'am.
Renamed oil and grease is a big thing.
A famous old head bicycle guy puts his name on chainsaw bar oil an charges 10X+.
On the other hand the wrong lubes can be expensive too.
Yep. In the US, It's Phil Wood grease and "Tenacious" oil. Phil was a rider and engineer who invented sealed bottom brackets and hubs for bikes and wheelchairs, designed a spoke machine, and in retirement wrote books on differential calculus and knots.
1661855853559.png
1661856957148.png
 

Blue Crab

benthivore
16,155
2,598
Outer Banks
Oh, cute; you're attempting to be insulting.
Weak shit, my man.
"You're a girl tehehe": Words as strong as the person saying them. Step up your game.
Nah, I was just going for a smile. "Bumpers" struck me as girlish. Different kind of fox, I guess. I wasn't joking about those other hints as I'm reading you as a noob of sorts. No mean-spirited offense intended.

Good sailing, Cap.:cool:
 

sculpin

Super Anarchist
McMaster delivers to me in the outland in two days, so not really a "go slow" world... and for electrical bits (crimps, heatshrink) I get Digikey in a day. If I can't plan projects that far ahead I'm in some sort of panic mode...
 

Coastal_Fox

Member
247
102
New England
Nah, I was just going for a smile. "Bumpers" struck me as girlish. Different kind of fox, I guess. I wasn't joking about those other hints as I'm reading you as a noob of sorts. No mean-spirited offense intended.

Good sailing, Cap.:cool:
Haha, do i really give off that vibe? I guess i could see it.
No, I'm a dude haha. Sorry.

As for experience, I've been on boats learning how to navigate in and out of marinas since i was 6. Like learning the rules of the road so to speak. Then around 12 my father got a sailboat, a Columbia 26, because he just kind of decided they were cool, and he liked tinkering with things and was bored with the camper. So thats how i learned to sail, by watching him figuring it out, more or less.
Later in life and most recently, i would take my friend who was a commercial fisherman out and around block island on his boat after he lost use of his arm to cancer.

So, i can be safe on a boat and not cause any problems and be respectful to the people around me. But unfortunately a linguist was rearly with me so sometimes i do things like call fenders bumpers, because thats the purpose they serve and i have much more automotive experience. Like, you don't keep your car bumpers attached to the driveway, and you definitely don't want to absorbe an inpact with your fender haha, you know?
If i have to order the part, I'll be able to look it up, but if I'm just speaking casually I'll normally say bumper, because like 95% of my friends have 0 boating experience, never mind a glossary, and I'd like to communicate what i mean to them efficiently without teaching a formal lesson, esp if we're on the boat.
And thats probably how the guys in my life tought me too. It's all very blue collar is all haha.

So, I'll try harder to call things the correct vocabulary when talking around here, but it's never what comes to mind first, but as i stay involved with it, that will probably change.
 

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