Materials Science

Lark

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The boat is a trailer launched pocket cruiser with wood furniture instead of a liner. It does get some week long cruises, use in coldish weather (hoodie sailing) and frequent use. The galley cabinet came with sliding acrylic doors, carefully rabbited to fit in a track. The aesthetics are great. The doors travel easily in all weather, but don't bang around in a chop. The act of sliding one against the handle on the opposite door has caused a stress crack to form at the screw holes for the handle. It also has a chip where it was closed against something in cold weather. What should the replacement doors be cut from?

The V berth has very light weight sliding doors of some sort of 'plastic'. It's dimensionally stable, fairly rigid, light, not brittle and factory finish was a white that would keep the tiny cabin from looking too busy. I have no idea what it was to order a sheet.

Acrylic: Heavy. Appearance was very cool, especially for such a cramped interior (22 foot pocket cruiser). I doubt I could create the rabbit and they have proven to be too brittle for the abuse I put a boat through.

Marine plywood: Online order only. Easy to work. Light. I know there are various woods available for the A side.

Maple veneer furniture type plywood: in stock at the home center, cheap. I'm concerned the rabbit will swell, since the polyurethane will rub off against the slide. They are easy to replace every so often. Light. The surface can be finished to resemble other furniture in the boat but will make it feel smaller.

Carbon Fiber: (I wish).

I could also switch to swinging cabinet doors, but in such a tiny space the open doors would block the companionway when open and the berth will make them hard to open at night when I realize I want something in the cabinet.
 

phill_nz

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option e
chemical weld
if you cannot handle any visible repair .. use a dressing strip for cosmetics and protection
 
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El Borracho

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The screws in the acrylic were a design mistake. Otherwise acrylic is a reasonable, if heavy, solution. Quality plywood, mine is around 6mm, is a great lightweight and easy to fab solution. Do make the rabbets generous in width and depth.

If some rattle in storms or while motoring do what cruisers do: quiet it with one of the four dozen extra tea towels we carry.
 

toddster

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I used 1/8" ABS sheeting for bypass doors. Very light weight, but black. The tracks are slightly curved to create a little friction and prevent rattling or self-opening. Vinyl screw-down tracks can be ordered from Rockler or Amazon but after messing with the stuff, if I still had a table saw, I'd just cut tracks into a wood batten.
 

Fleetwood

Member
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Sydney, Oz
Polycarbonate sheet - it is lightweight and higher impact resistance than acrylic (less brittle). Can be scratched (easy to polish out) if its not hardcoated. Easy to cut, not expensive.
 

Lark

Supper Anarchist
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Ohio
I used 1/8" ABS sheeting for bypass doors. Very light weight, but black. The tracks are slightly curved to create a little friction and prevent rattling or self-opening. Vinyl screw-down tracks can be ordered from Rockler or Amazon but after messing with the stuff, if I still had a table saw, I'd just cut tracks into a wood batten.
After some further google education on ABS, and the tangent I found on Acetyl Copolymer, it looks like one of these might fit my needs better then ply. Likely the builder used one or the other for the V berth. Edit. Now I need to educate myself on polycarbonate.
 

Lark

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Twin wall polycarbonate is cheap and light
Ah. This stuff I know, but not by name. Ive been playing with some to make a second light weight companionway hatch for cruising. One side is UV protected. It’s a shame all these materials are special order so I can’t examine them at the home center. Also they become less cheap with shipping. So I know how polycarbonate cuts. Thanks.
 

Lark

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Ohio
Thanks @Grrr... . I didn't make the connection, though I read it could be colored. This thread is dragging me into the modern century. I'm more comfortable with what wood is suitable for what. Sorry Leo of Sampson Boat Co, wood just isn't the best choice for the modern boater- if the objective is time under sail instead of time in the yard.
 

cyclone

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Maine
Two or even three-walled polycarbonate is usually clear and relatively rigid and is often used as a form of glazing. Coroplast is corrugated polypropylene and is opaque, more flexible, and often colored. It is often used for small real estate and political signs as Grr stated. Home Depot stocks white Coroplast sheets.
 

Grrr...

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Thanks @Grrr... . I didn't make the connection, though I read it could be colored. This thread is dragging me into the modern century. I'm more comfortable with what wood is suitable for what. Sorry Leo of Sampson Boat Co, wood just isn't the best choice for the modern boater- if the objective is time under sail instead of time in the yard.
Ahhhh it just clicked. Expanded pvc might be a good option.
 

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