Modified Columbia 30 info?

c56602

Member
58
12
Cayuga Lake
We ran it like this today. It is a bit awkward but gives the helm much more feel immediately. For the setup we have this appears to be close to how to do it. The PO said that it wasn’t worth doing. We beg to differ!

um. Can you see anything in this?

6E3EADF8-C80B-42C5-8D1B-1D5E95DF0362.jpeg

 

c56602

Member
58
12
Cayuga Lake
It is functional... It just takes more effort than I think it should!

Anyway... Our new secret weapon showed up today... This is the 1000sf A2 that will be our light air. Replaces our 800sf. Now... We did read through the comments in the thread talking about the relative merits of each size... And we find that on light-air days a J/100 can sail a tiny bit deeper than we can with our old A2. And that difference has been enough to have them beating us. Well... We should be able to sail a tiny bit deeper with this. Maybe!

sw.jpg

 

c56602

Member
58
12
Cayuga Lake
They are flying a freaking giant asym most of the time. When it turns out to be a reach and we pop the Code 0 we do very well against that. But on a run they're just a little faster and just a little deeper...

We share a rating in the fleet and last week they crossed 2 seconds ahead of us in 1h18 race... It's fun to race against folks with the same rating and to know exactly how you're doing against them! And it will be more fun when we cross 30s ahead of them!

 
RE: Mainsheet-

Ryley said:

"as an aside, I like your setup. our main coarse tune is still on the traveler, which makes it tricky. Fine tune is on that eye like yours."

I definitely like the Coarse on center. Make sure you beef up the padeye with a backer to take the loads. Shorter arms reach and its accessible to either crew or helm when you need it. Plus, it's safer too.

On "Mr Pongs", we are refining this further. I routed the Fine tune to both sides, beside the traveler cleats. Basically same setup as a Farr 30. Really nice. Probably moving to that setup myself down the road.

 
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They are flying a freaking giant asym most of the time. When it turns out to be a reach and we pop the Code 0 we do very well against that. But on a run they're just a little faster and just a little deeper...

We share a rating in the fleet and last week they crossed 2 seconds ahead of us in 1h18 race... It's fun to race against folks with the same rating and to know exactly how you're doing against them! And it will be more fun when we cross 30s ahead of them!
You should be dusting a J100 (and 109's) downwind.

Upwind in breeze, not likely but downwind, it shouldn't be an issue.

Bow up, build speed, then soak down w/pressure, repeat.

If you're forced to go deep due to narrow channel constraints, different story there.

 

c56602

Member
58
12
Cayuga Lake
You should be dusting a J100 (and 109's) downwind.
I'll let the helm know that :)  I'm paying attention to other things most of the time. Hell, I didn't even know that we had a collision last week!

We might not get to fly our secret weapon this week - race time is looking like 16 gusting 27 right now. Sounds more like A5 (or baby A5) weather to me... 

 

ryley

Super Anarchist
5,544
682
Boston, MA
We might not get to fly our secret weapon this week - race time is looking like 16 gusting 27 right now. Sounds more like A5 (or baby A5) weather to me... 
our A2 is 950 sf and 16 gusting to 27 is easily handled. maybe not with a fresh crew still learning the ropes, but you'll get there. You have to be careful about going too big or clew too low because the boat accelerates so quickly you'll have a hard time staying on top of the kite trim and the gybes will seem really slow. But as I14 said, the J100 especially with overlapping genoa will hold with you upwind in almost anything except light stuff where they get a little sticky. you should be smoking them downwind. In PHRF-NE the J100 rates around 96. what do you rate?

 

c56602

Member
58
12
Cayuga Lake
We do still have the 800sf A2 and our crew has been together for over 8 years… But we have crewed together over 8 years on displacement boats mostly and more of that has been with a pole than an asym.
 

Our cert (and that of the J!) is at 87. We get 12 points for the 3/4 rig. Well, hey, ok. Thanks for the bonus!
 

We got the bigger sail for downwind because they beat us a few times on light days. And, well, the sail was already manufactured for the PO and had been sitting on a shelf for over 14 months... Sitting on a shelf with our sail number on it and all. So “ordering a sail” was saying, “Uh. Well, how much do you want for it?” (And then going through the price dance and all, but, really, I had a new sail “made for this boat” and delivered in under two weeks.)
 

We are lake sailing but our lake is a mile wide and 40 long. There are large hills on either side of the lake. The topography makes local knowledge vital for winning. When they had Laser nationals here the kids (persons under 30?) who had a few months of experience on the lake (as sailing instructors) did really well with that. (And the awesome sailors from away did fine as they always do. Still… I think the kids beat them…)

 

c56602

Member
58
12
Cayuga Lake
It was pretty close to 16 gusting 27. We were OK with the A5 up but it's not a super comfortable boat to race in wind and we didn't do very well this week. Ah well - we'll get to pull out our new secret weapon some other day!

 
You're referring to the "factory" setup which is almost worthless. Not enough purchase/control.

Some boats including myself have upgraded this hardware and added a 2:1 cascade along with deflectors at the hounds for better control of headstay tension upwind. You'll need to beef up attachment points up there but well worth the effort.

 
Jeannic2 said:

"Hello SA, I just bought a Columbia 30 Sport Boat 2005 in Bayfield, WI and I need to trailer it to my place: Saguenay River, Quebec Canada. The mast is stepped on a hinge and is carbon fiber. I guess it is quite easy to lower it without the need of a crane. Someone can provide some instructions or information on how to proceed?

Thanks!"

Congrats again on the boat.

Note - some boats are rigged a bit differently than others. Some have hinges, some don't. Some pivot back.

Important - First thing is to check your mast hinge to make sure it is in good working order and not corroded before you start lowering/lifting process.

Most setups have the mast pivoting forward...

If that is the case, here is what we do:

Calculate your mast lowering area requirements. Rig is going to come down almost 30' in front of boat. Make sure you clear everything. Watch for power lines, people, pets, property, etc. obviously. It's a safe to do this on the trailer if you can but I've done it in the water with no issues.

We keep the boom attached and use main halyard/boom as a fulcrum. We also leave shrouds attached since entire rig pivots forward. Your choice, but I like to put a single hi-load block on the end of the boom in place of mainsheet. I then use at least a 3/8" or larger line that ties into one of the stern pad eyes (spin block attachment) at the aft quarter, runs thru the single block on boom and over the the opposite pad eye with another single hi-load attached, leading to winch. This keeps the boom (lever) centered as it pivots forward and loaded up. Slowly ease line with multiple wraps on winch. Ease her down slowly while another person helps guide it all into place.

Tip - don't let go of line while mast is lowering.

It helps to have someone as backup and also there to help guide everything in place as it pivots down. It will eventually come down and nest into the pulpit "U" shape on the bow. Make sure you pad this beforehand. Hot water pipe insulation foam tubing or pool noodle works well here. Once rig is in the U, you can carefully remove the boom and unpin the rig and move the rig aft for transport. I like to remove the spreaders and standing rigging for transport but that's just me.

It's a big rig, so make sure you have a couple of bodies to help out. Double check everything beforehand.

Safety first. I'm sure others may chime in with what they do but this works for us.
 

c56602

Member
58
12
Cayuga Lake
We also leave shrouds attached since entire rig pivots forward.
Our chainplates are aft of the mast tabernacle and that hinges forwards. When our mast is down we do not have enough slack to attach the shrouds. This would cause problems trying to drop the mast as well - something (shrouds) would end up way too tight.
 

Our manual says to use halyards as shrouds and to adjust lengths frequently. This must apply more when going up than down but still…

Although, like you say, there’s a lot of variation.

 

ryley

Super Anarchist
5,544
682
Boston, MA
So collective hive, I've got a small problem. the head on my 1gm10 cracked, and a couple weeks ago I pulled the engine (1.5 hours and minimal swearing) for a rebuild. In the meantime we've been sailing in and out of our slip but it's clearly not ideal for any kind of race that starts more than a couple miles from the marina. The engine won't be ready for another couple weeks.

I have an 8hp 2 stroke that I could use, but I'd rather not have to drill any holes or make anything permanent to mount this thing. Or if I do have to, what is available that would fit the transom?

Any bright ideas out there?

 

dolphinmaster

Super Anarchist
1,684
174
Chapel Hill, NC
So collective hive, I've got a small problem. the head on my 1gm10 cracked, and a couple weeks ago I pulled the engine (1.5 hours and minimal swearing) for a rebuild. In the meantime we've been sailing in and out of our slip but it's clearly not ideal for any kind of race that starts more than a couple miles from the marina. The engine won't be ready for another couple weeks.

I have an 8hp 2 stroke that I could use, but I'd rather not have to drill any holes or make anything permanent to mount this thing. Or if I do have to, what is available that would fit the transom?

Any bright ideas out there?
Buzz up your friendly competitors and arrange tow for beer to and fro!:)

 


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