Modified Columbia 30 info?

Jeannic2

New member
34
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Saguenay
As we often have 25-30 kts winds on the Saguenay River, should I go for a storm jib, as previously mentioned by Irrational 14 in similar conditions?
 

ryley

Super Anarchist
5,517
666
Boston, MA
Well noted. I will have the main modified during the next winter and ask quotations for a smaller jib. If we go ahead with more serious racing, I could have a new main with bolt rope fabricated and kept for regattas. Ryley, post some pics of your reefing arrangements if you can. I will need to modify my setup for more efficiency.
I'll see if I can get you a picture, it's pretty straightforward slab reefing. I still need to mount a cheek block on the mast but I haven't done the measurements for exactly where it goes, so what I have works but isn't perfect. It takes me about 2 minutes to put the reef in and a little longer to shake it out because of the bolt rope.
 

Jeannic2

New member
34
6
Saguenay
My setup is for Summer breeze on (usually 15-22 ish) - more rake and strung rig. Note we sail w/H1 or #4 regularly. Boat is a riot downwind.

Still optimizing my light air setup... will have more data as I sail more in the light this fall.

For your lighter breeze, you will obviously be softer on your settings but not much as the Southern Spars rig likes to be boned on with it's wide shroud base, plus it's safer to have it like this in case someone is on the runner too late. It's a pretty well built and robust rig regardless.

We sail with top stay runners upwind and down. I also rigged deflectors at hounds. You shouldn't need deflectors with your increased forestay height. Original config forestay is too soft w/o them lacking pointing and ability to flatten main.

I figure with your config, you will need to de-power earlier than your sister-ships so these numbers may work for you but pretty sure your higher forestay height will effect the original design bend characteristics so check for any inversion going on while tuning, especially when you wind on the primaries since they are terminated lower than your forestay. Entering new territory here.

You can start with the following as a base and tweak to match your luff curve on your main. If you are getting overbend wrinkles too early, you'll need to tweak it until you have uniformity. Looking for about 1.75" prebend uniformly from gooseneck to tip.

Lowers = 27 (wind this up more for power and fuller main down low)

Primaries = 36 (range from 27 to 38)

Caps = 32 (wind on more if you have the railmeat to handle it)

Don't over tighten anything more than 38 on loose. Make sure your boat can accommodate this tension.
Raven was carried on the road and the mast was down. I tuned the rig as mentioned in the owner manual. that was the only information I had at that time for the rig tension. Uppers 21, Lowers 20 and intermediate 27. Should I increase the rig tension? I know that your chainplates were reinforced but there is a huge difference between the setting in the owner manual and yours. The intermediates turnbuckles are almost at the end of the threads.
 
Raven was carried on the road and the mast was down. I tuned the rig as mentioned in the owner manual. that was the only information I had at that time for the rig tension. Uppers 21, Lowers 20 and intermediate 27. Should I increase the rig tension? I know that your chainplates were reinforced but there is a huge difference between the setting in the owner manual and yours. The intermediates turnbuckles are almost at the end of the threads.
I would not recommend the above settings until you have had the chainplates professionally reinforced. Note those numbers would be for higher breeze while sailing and then you relax the rig again when docked.
What you can do in the meantime would be to start using some runner upwind to help depower/point.
 

ryley

Super Anarchist
5,517
666
Boston, MA
I would not recommend the above settings until you have had the chainplates professionally reinforced. Note those numbers would be for higher breeze while sailing and then you relax the rig again when docked.
What you can do in the meantime would be to start using some runner upwind to help depower/point.
How were they reinforced?
 
The Southern Spars rig likes to be boned on since you don't have a regular backstay. You need to maintain headstay tension with the primary shrouds, mainsheet and top stay runners, especially as the wind strength increases. Like a lot of boats, the hull to deck joint can be compromised if you are running higher tensions. C30/32's have the Internal Carbon load beam to take the tension at the chain-plates but it stops just short at the hull to deck flange. What this means is that the boat is engineered to not Taco but the hull/deck joint still needs additional reinforcement in this one particular area.
Mine was starting to lift about a half centimeter right inside the chain-plates. This is just a bonded joint. Adding Carbon UNI on the inside flange of the hull, then bolting thru the deck/hull joint (I used Wichard U-bolt on each side but you could also use a short piece of T-track)) makes for a very rigid connection. This is what should of been done originally. It also serves double duty as an outhauler/sheet lead since it's exactly in the right spot. Perfect for those long reaches.

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Jeannic2

New member
34
6
Saguenay
Get a heavy Dacron #4 jib. Not a storm jib.
I also have 2 reefs in my main but my squaretop is a bit larger.
I asked many quotes and received different suggestions and prices. I think a basic Dacron Cross-cut sail would be fine for this purpose. What do you have Irrational? North Sails are expensive. Higher quality of course but does it worth the price difference?
 

MPongs

New member
I asked many quotes and received different suggestions and prices. I think a basic Dacron Cross-cut sail would be fine for this purpose. What do you have Irrational? North Sails are expensive. Higher quality of course but does it worth the price difference?
When I got my high wind jib I went with carbon because the price difference was really small. I think if you're using it once in awhile Dacron works, but if you're sailing in a consistently high wind area, I'd go spend a bit extra.
 
I’d go Heavy Dacron (with high clew) mainly b/c the #4 jib is a workhorse on my boat since I sail in a predominantly windy area. Although the weight is a small penalty, it serves as a racing jib, doublehanding day sail jib,windy staysail, and sometimes delivery sail. It gets a lot of use along with some abuse from ragging in general.
We don’t use a furler so it also gets smashed about going up and down and pulling thru the hatch. The heavier fabric keeps this sails shape and remains stiff and blade like. Hardly any signs of wear over 3.5 years now.
I probably would have gone thru at least one Carbon #4 by now in the same time span.
I already blew up my Carbon Heavy 3 jib that came with the boat. It is now in the garage reserved for duffel bag fabric.
With any #4 jib, the foot will be a bit shorter. Make sure you have a proper lead to go forward. This may require an additional padeye to install if your existing track is not long enough.
 

Jeannic2

New member
34
6
Saguenay
There is a track and a traveler already installed for a smaller jib. I'll go with a crosscut or tri-radial Dacron sail that will be made during the coming winter. The season is already close the the end over here.
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@Irrational 14, are you planning one sharing your results from the Long Beach to Dana Point race on your Col 30-2? or am I going to have to do it for you? :LOL:
Wife and I decided to Doublehand this one…
30 boats. Start inside LB breakwater with a beat up inside the harbor, then out Angels Gate with a reach to the Oil Islands roughly 10 miles out. Round to port and down to Dana. Course is roughly 40 miles. We just tried to sail in clean air on the beat and keep up with the larger boats on the reach. With just the two of us, I decided against the C0 in the building breeze. No furler makes it tough and that would of been a game changer here.
Halfway to the islands, I deployed the A2 and kept the jib as a staysail which helped stabilize the boat with the mainsail occasionally flogging in order to stay high and get around. After that it was sail max vmg with target boat speed and catch every swell. Jibe back in and hit a nice header to take us in and across the line at 12 knots with 2 dogs in the cockpit. 1st in the DH division, 2nd in class, and 2nd overall. Missed the top overall spot by 7 sec. to a C&C 30 OD fully crewed.
Things I liked- letter box douses in the cockpit. No need to go up on bow.
Things I want next time- new furler and torsion cable for my code zero.
I14.
 

Jeannic2

New member
34
6
Saguenay
Congratulation I14, great performance! I did my first friendly race 3 weeks ago. Absolutely no wind this day, which is unusual for the Saguenay River. As the fleet in my place is mostly cruising boats, I could at least conclude that my Col 30 is very fast in the light air compare to those big fat campers. We started in the last group and finished 2nd at the finish line, a long time after a Melges 20 driven by a very motivated crew.
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Jeannic2

New member
34
6
Saguenay
It looks that my mast has a lot of pre-bend compare to the other boats. The runner are loose and there is still a prononced bend. How much pre-bend do you have in your mast? Should I release some tension on the rig for the winter storage period? Maybe the headstay is too tight?




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Looks like you have a bit more prebend than needed. The photos may distort the actual.
The distant shot actually looks better. Strive for 2.5 -3” max. Your luff curve in your main determines the pre
Any photos of the mainsail shape?
Are you running the same numbers as me? Headstay length can vary among boats. I have the rake measurement somewhere. Let me find it.
You can definitely ease the tension for winter storage. Just make sure the mast doesn’t pump in the breeze.

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Jeannic2

New member
34
6
Saguenay
Ouaip, I will release some tension on the headstay, this should reduce the prebend. As I have a furler on the headstay, I can't measure the tension but I will adjust following the 2.5'' to 3'' prebend. I see on your picture the bungie retainers for the runners. This was on my project list for next season. We were not used to the runners and have been mixed up with them many times. I guess the retainers makes the operations easier when rising the main?
 




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