mr. bill's dog

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carlsbad
I have been searching the Internet unsuccessfully for a sailboat called Mr. Bill’s Dog my father used to race all over the world. I have been on some of the largest sailboat forums asking all the right questions about the boat and posting information to once again have the chance to see Mr. Bill’s Dog. The boat was designed by Bruce Kelley, and built by Lovfauld Marine located in Florida.

In 1976, my father Mike McKillip began sailing. One of his clients was sailing a three-quarter ton sailboat named ‘Fun.’ My father really got into the sport and bought a sailboat and started racing. The year before my father was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. He was told that he had about five years to do what he wanted and that the doctors really didn’t know how the MS was going to affect him.

In 1977 he was sailing every weekend, and my two brothers and I would spend the weekends at the cabin at Grand Lake while dad went racing. 1977 was a good learning year for my dad, as he won the PORC in San Diego and placed 3rd in the three-quarter ton Torc in Corpus Christi, Tex.

In 1978 he had placed second in the one-quarter ton North Americans located in New Orleans, and placed first in 1978 at the Mini-Ton North American in Dallas sailing a Lindenburg 22 named Sauerkraut. In 1978 dad started talking to Bruce Kelley about designing a Mini-Ton boat. The boat was built by Lovfauld Marine in Florida in 10 weeks. It was a cold molded boat from what I have been told.

“1979 my father was losing the use of his legs and was complaining about how the bottoms of his feet were feeling. I remember him going to Dallas for treatments. He would come home from Dallas and Houston and would spend weeks in the bed trying to recover from the doctors” exploratory treatments. Despite the medical problems, 1979 was again another great year of sailing for my dad. He won the 1979 Mini Ton North American in Marina Del Ray, and again in 1980 in Annapolis. At this point the Mini-Ton association was becoming very strong and my father was invited to the World Championships in Scotland.

By this time my dad had taken a turn for the worse and was now walking with a cane. I remember him taking us all to Hawaii for Christmas in 1979. By the time we all got back he now had to use crutches, and he decided to let the crew of the boat take her to Scotland.

In 1980 the crew of Mr. Bill’s Dog had won the World Championship. Dad seemed like he was on top of the world, but he was stricken with the MS. At this point in our lives things started to change. The expensive cars and houses were being sold to pay for medical bills. The boats were all sold, and the cabin at the lake was also sold. I have fond memories of Grand Lake; I also remember my oldest brother taking my father over his shoulder and having to carry him down the catwalk to the dock with Max, our English bulldog, sitting on the beach eating rocks.

My father was a fighter and wouldn’t let the Multiple Sclerosis keep him down. He was a fine arts major from the University of Tulsa and had learned to use a head mouse so he could paint on the computer. He had a showing at Philbrook Museum in Tulsa. It seemed that he was keeping his mind off of the MS and back on the sport he loved, sailing.

In 2003 my wife and I bought a 1975 San Juan 24 sailboat from the local MS Society. My father had remembered the boat from his sailing days, and my wife and I loved going over to my parents home and telling my father what we had learned on the boat. In 2004 we bought a Capri 25, which needed some work done to it, and I would love going over to the house and telling dad again what I was up to. I was repairing the boat for our annual MS Close Regatta that was to be held on September 10, 2005. It was June of 2005 when I received the news that my father had only about a month to live. I spent every day at his bedside or at the lake trying to get the boat into the water.

July 1, 2005, my dad passed away at 59 years old with us all at his side. His last request was for him to be set out to sea. He wanted his ashes spread into the Gulf of Mexico off of Corpus Christi. “Not in the bay,” he said “but in the ocean” where he used to sail. On my father’s birthday my mother felt it was her time to let my father go. Mike Braney lived down in Corpus along with a great friend of my parents Mark Foster. Braney and Mark had set us up with a great place to stay, and we set out to sea on dad’s birthday, spreading his ashes into the Gulf. We had a relaxing day back at Corpus.

I sail our boat because of my father. He never really had the chance to teach me how to sail. But I would sit by his bedside and listen to him tell me what I needed to do. Without him in my life I would have never had the sensation of the wind blowing across my face. When I walk outside and I feel the winds picking up, I think of him. I know that he would have given anything to be sitting by my side on the weather rail.

For whoever has the boat Mr. Bill’s Dog, you hold a very important part of the lives and history of the McKillips. Keep her in good shape, and sail her fast.

I lost my father Michael McKillip to Multiple Sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease in which one’s immune system eats away at the protective sheath that covers the nerves.

Later this year will be the 31st year that Windycrest Sailing Club holds the MS Close Regatta. The Regatta will be held in September.

For more information about how one can support the MS Society, please visit a local MS Chapter or Windycrest Sailing Club Windycrest Sailing Club is located on Keystone Lake just a 30 minute drive from Tulsa.

This article was written by the son of Mike McKillip, a Tulsan and Regatta sailor who won the World Championship in 1980 in Scotland while suffering from Multiple Sclerosis. Chris McKillip writes of his memories of his late father and his love for and successes at sailing. His son hopes to repeat his father’s sailing successes and fight MS by supporting the MS Close Regatta at Keystone Lake in Sept. Thanks to GTS newspapers.

 

Vgree

Super Anarchist
4,445
194
OKC, Oklahoma
Don't know where the boat is but I can tell you that I along with several other Santana 20's will be at the regatta supporting the cause. Windycrest put on a great regatta last spring, I don't see how this will be different!

Always cool to hear about sailors from Oklahoma and other land locked states who went on to have huge sailing careers!

 

readyabout82

Member
326
0
41l9Gm2-NML._SL500_AA280_.jpg
 

Don'tCallMeJudge

Super Anarchist
Michael McKillip lived as full a life as possible while fighting (and living) with Multiple Sclerosis! And he did so with great courage and great honor.

I'm one of the truly lucky ones. My own MS, while very real, is not stopping me. I'm still walking and sailing six years after my own diagnosis. My little sister is doing the same a year after her own diagnosis. Research and drug advances have come a long way since Michael was diagnosed in the mid-70s. There is real hope available today for those living with the disease, and for their families. That hope is based on research and public awareness, and that's where your support comes in. This thread is very timely since it happens that this is National MS Awareness Week.

That's why I run the MS Cup sailing race on Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota each August. And it's why anyone who can, should participate in and/or support the Windycrest Sailing Club's MS Close Regatta in September. Please do it in honor of Chris's father and everyone else who lives with this horrible disease. Please step up to the plate and help make a difference!

Here's the Oklahoma event (last year's event link): Close MS Regatta

 
Last edited by a moderator:

morty

Member
57
0
I have some old Seahorse magazines and may have the one on the Mini Ton Cup Scotland. If I can find it I will scan it for you.

Also following on from the Quarter Ton revival (www.quartertonclass.org) there are a group of guys in the UK starting a Mini Ton revival and will have a class at the Vice Admirals Cup in Cowes this year. I think their website is www.mintonner.com

Good luck

 

Busbydunlop

New member
26
0
Scotland
Hi,

I live and sail in Scotland, did the boat goe back to the USA ? If it's still here I have contacts in most clubs and would be happy to get a search going here for you

cheers

Graeme

 

sailorbuz

New member
1
0
I have been searching the Internet unsuccessfully for a sailboat called Mr. Bill's Dog my father used to race all over the world. I have been on some of the largest sailboat forums asking all the right questions about the boat and posting information to once again have the chance to see Mr. Bill's Dog. The boat was designed by Bruce Kelley, and built by Lovfauld Marine located in Florida.

In 1976, my father Mike McKillip began sailing. One of his clients was sailing a three-quarter ton sailboat named 'Fun.' My father really got into the sport and bought a sailboat and started racing. The year before my father was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. He was told that he had about five years to do what he wanted and that the doctors really didn't know how the MS was going to affect him.

In 1977 he was sailing every weekend, and my two brothers and I would spend the weekends at the cabin at Grand Lake while dad went racing. 1977 was a good learning year for my dad, as he won the PORC in San Diego and placed 3rd in the three-quarter ton Torc in Corpus Christi, Tex.

In 1978 he had placed second in the one-quarter ton North Americans located in New Orleans, and placed first in 1978 at the Mini-Ton North American in Dallas sailing a Lindenburg 22 named Sauerkraut. In 1978 dad started talking to Bruce Kelley about designing a Mini-Ton boat. The boat was built by Lovfauld Marine in Florida in 10 weeks. It was a cold molded boat from what I have been told.

"1979 my father was losing the use of his legs and was complaining about how the bottoms of his feet were feeling. I remember him going to Dallas for treatments. He would come home from Dallas and Houston and would spend weeks in the bed trying to recover from the doctors" exploratory treatments. Despite the medical problems, 1979 was again another great year of sailing for my dad. He won the 1979 Mini Ton North American in Marina Del Ray, and again in 1980 in Annapolis. At this point the Mini-Ton association was becoming very strong and my father was invited to the World Championships in Scotland.

By this time my dad had taken a turn for the worse and was now walking with a cane. I remember him taking us all to Hawaii for Christmas in 1979. By the time we all got back he now had to use crutches, and he decided to let the crew of the boat take her to Scotland.

In 1980 the crew of Mr. Bill's Dog had won the World Championship. Dad seemed like he was on top of the world, but he was stricken with the MS. At this point in our lives things started to change. The expensive cars and houses were being sold to pay for medical bills. The boats were all sold, and the cabin at the lake was also sold. I have fond memories of Grand Lake; I also remember my oldest brother taking my father over his shoulder and having to carry him down the catwalk to the dock with Max, our English bulldog, sitting on the beach eating rocks.

My father was a fighter and wouldn't let the Multiple Sclerosis keep him down. He was a fine arts major from the University of Tulsa and had learned to use a head mouse so he could paint on the computer. He had a showing at Philbrook Museum in Tulsa. It seemed that he was keeping his mind off of the MS and back on the sport he loved, sailing.

In 2003 my wife and I bought a 1975 San Juan 24 sailboat from the local MS Society. My father had remembered the boat from his sailing days, and my wife and I loved going over to my parents home and telling my father what we had learned on the boat. In 2004 we bought a Capri 25, which needed some work done to it, and I would love going over to the house and telling dad again what I was up to. I was repairing the boat for our annual MS Close Regatta that was to be held on September 10, 2005. It was June of 2005 when I received the news that my father had only about a month to live. I spent every day at his bedside or at the lake trying to get the boat into the water.

July 1, 2005, my dad passed away at 59 years old with us all at his side. His last request was for him to be set out to sea. He wanted his ashes spread into the Gulf of Mexico off of Corpus Christi. "Not in the bay," he said "but in the ocean" where he used to sail. On my father's birthday my mother felt it was her time to let my father go. Mike Braney lived down in Corpus along with a great friend of my parents Mark Foster. Braney and Mark had set us up with a great place to stay, and we set out to sea on dad's birthday, spreading his ashes into the Gulf. We had a relaxing day back at Corpus.

I sail our boat because of my father. He never really had the chance to teach me how to sail. But I would sit by his bedside and listen to him tell me what I needed to do. Without him in my life I would have never had the sensation of the wind blowing across my face. When I walk outside and I feel the winds picking up, I think of him. I know that he would have given anything to be sitting by my side on the weather rail.

For whoever has the boat Mr. Bill's Dog, you hold a very important part of the lives and history of the McKillips. Keep her in good shape, and sail her fast.

I lost my father Michael McKillip to Multiple Sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease in which one's immune system eats away at the protective sheath that covers the nerves.

Later this year will be the 31st year that Windycrest Sailing Club holds the MS Close Regatta. The Regatta will be held in September.

For more information about how one can support the MS Society, please visit a local MS Chapter or Windycrest Sailing Club Windycrest Sailing Club is located on Keystone Lake just a 30 minute drive from Tulsa.

This article was written by the son of Mike McKillip, a Tulsan and Regatta sailor who won the World Championship in 1980 in Scotland while suffering from Multiple Sclerosis. Chris McKillip writes of his memories of his late father and his love for and successes at sailing. His son hopes to repeat his father's sailing successes and fight MS by supporting the MS Close Regatta at Keystone Lake in Sept. Thanks to GTS newspapers.
 
I have been searching the Internet unsuccessfully for a sailboat called Mr. Bill's Dog my father used to race all over the world. I have been on some of the largest sailboat forums asking all the right questions about the boat and posting information to once again have the chance to see Mr. Bill's Dog. The boat was designed by Bruce Kelley, and built by Lovfauld Marine located in Florida.

In 1976, my father Mike McKillip began sailing. One of his clients was sailing a three-quarter ton sailboat named 'Fun.' My father really got into the sport and bought a sailboat and started racing. The year before my father was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. He was told that he had about five years to do what he wanted and that the doctors really didn't know how the MS was going to affect him.

In 1977 he was sailing every weekend, and my two brothers and I would spend the weekends at the cabin at Grand Lake while dad went racing. 1977 was a good learning year for my dad, as he won the PORC in San Diego and placed 3rd in the three-quarter ton Torc in Corpus Christi, Tex.

In 1978 he had placed second in the one-quarter ton North Americans located in New Orleans, and placed first in 1978 at the Mini-Ton North American in Dallas sailing a Lindenburg 22 named Sauerkraut. In 1978 dad started talking to Bruce Kelley about designing a Mini-Ton boat. The boat was built by Lovfauld Marine in Florida in 10 weeks. It was a cold molded boat from what I have been told.

"1979 my father was losing the use of his legs and was complaining about how the bottoms of his feet were feeling. I remember him going to Dallas for treatments. He would come home from Dallas and Houston and would spend weeks in the bed trying to recover from the doctors" exploratory treatments. Despite the medical problems, 1979 was again another great year of sailing for my dad. He won the 1979 Mini Ton North American in Marina Del Ray, and again in 1980 in Annapolis. At this point the Mini-Ton association was becoming very strong and my father was invited to the World Championships in Scotland.

By this time my dad had taken a turn for the worse and was now walking with a cane. I remember him taking us all to Hawaii for Christmas in 1979. By the time we all got back he now had to use crutches, and he decided to let the crew of the boat take her to Scotland.

In 1980 the crew of Mr. Bill's Dog had won the World Championship. Dad seemed like he was on top of the world, but he was stricken with the MS. At this point in our lives things started to change. The expensive cars and houses were being sold to pay for medical bills. The boats were all sold, and the cabin at the lake was also sold. I have fond memories of Grand Lake; I also remember my oldest brother taking my father over his shoulder and having to carry him down the catwalk to the dock with Max, our English bulldog, sitting on the beach eating rocks.

My father was a fighter and wouldn't let the Multiple Sclerosis keep him down. He was a fine arts major from the University of Tulsa and had learned to use a head mouse so he could paint on the computer. He had a showing at Philbrook Museum in Tulsa. It seemed that he was keeping his mind off of the MS and back on the sport he loved, sailing.

In 2003 my wife and I bought a 1975 San Juan 24 sailboat from the local MS Society. My father had remembered the boat from his sailing days, and my wife and I loved going over to my parents home and telling my father what we had learned on the boat. In 2004 we bought a Capri 25, which needed some work done to it, and I would love going over to the house and telling dad again what I was up to. I was repairing the boat for our annual MS Close Regatta that was to be held on September 10, 2005. It was June of 2005 when I received the news that my father had only about a month to live. I spent every day at his bedside or at the lake trying to get the boat into the water.

July 1, 2005, my dad passed away at 59 years old with us all at his side. His last request was for him to be set out to sea. He wanted his ashes spread into the Gulf of Mexico off of Corpus Christi. "Not in the bay," he said "but in the ocean" where he used to sail. On my father's birthday my mother felt it was her time to let my father go. Mike Braney lived down in Corpus along with a great friend of my parents Mark Foster. Braney and Mark had set us up with a great place to stay, and we set out to sea on dad's birthday, spreading his ashes into the Gulf. We had a relaxing day back at Corpus.

I sail our boat because of my father. He never really had the chance to teach me how to sail. But I would sit by his bedside and listen to him tell me what I needed to do. Without him in my life I would have never had the sensation of the wind blowing across my face. When I walk outside and I feel the winds picking up, I think of him. I know that he would have given anything to be sitting by my side on the weather rail.

For whoever has the boat Mr. Bill's Dog, you hold a very important part of the lives and history of the McKillips. Keep her in good shape, and sail her fast.

I lost my father Michael McKillip to Multiple Sclerosis, a potentially debilitating disease in which one's immune system eats away at the protective sheath that covers the nerves.

Later this year will be the 31st year that Windycrest Sailing Club holds the MS Close Regatta. The Regatta will be held in September.

For more information about how one can support the MS Society, please visit a local MS Chapter or Windycrest Sailing Club Windycrest Sailing Club is located on Keystone Lake just a 30 minute drive from Tulsa.

This article was written by the son of Mike McKillip, a Tulsan and Regatta sailor who won the World Championship in 1980 in Scotland while suffering from Multiple Sclerosis. Chris McKillip writes of his memories of his late father and his love for and successes at sailing. His son hopes to repeat his father's sailing successes and fight MS by supporting the MS Close Regatta at Keystone Lake in Sept. Thanks to GTS newspapers.
OK I get the hint - I'll go look over at skulltobutt
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Janer

Super Anarchist
2,084
17
Santa Barbarian
Reply to DontCallMeJudge

I am very impressed that you have taken this disease control beyond yourself and your family to try to help others and organized others to work/fundraise for the cure. good on ya and best wishes for you and your sister. Our big event in Santa Barbara is the MS Walk which raises awareness and contributions. I have several friends with MS. Love to you, Janer

 

Don'tCallMeJudge

Super Anarchist
Reply to DontCallMeJudge

I am very impressed that you have taken this disease control beyond yourself and your family to try to help others and organized others to work/fundraise for the cure. good on ya and best wishes for you and your sister. Our big event in Santa Barbara is the MS Walk which raises awareness and contributions. I have several friends with MS. Love to you, Janer

Thank you, Janer.

Shortly after I was diagnosed in late 2003, friends in three states joined MS Walks and MS Rides on my behalf, including the MS Walk in Minneapolis. Although honored, I was a bit embarrassed. I figured I could still walk, so I had better join them. One thing led to another and four years later my MS Walk team (Team Sail, of course!) was the top fundraising team in the history of the event in MN. It got to be too much work for me, so I "retired" from the Walk, and now I just do the MS Cup race. Far less work for me since it's a race I run annually anyway. ;)

Once again... major kudos to the Windycrest Sailing Club and their MS regatta as well!

Has anyone found a lead to Mr. Bill's Dog yet?

 

Pelle

Anarchist
Maybe a post at the sailboat forum at www.boatdesign.net could be worthwhile....there are number of people with a lot of knowledge of the old IOR-boats posting there.....

 

sailite45

New member
1
0
That was one special boat. I was a junior sailor at Rush Creek Yacht Club when a brand, spanking new Mr Bill's Dog arrived for her final rigging, paint and shakedown sail. I remember they took out a J-24 as pace boat to help with the tune-up. Back in those days the J-24 was considered a fast boat, and being a few feet longer than MBD it was expected to be a while to get MBD up to a speed close to or maybe better than the J. Immediately after starting the first upwind pacing drill MBD just blew the doors off the J24. Faster or higher. At first they quietly suspected the owner/driver of the J-24 lacked helming competence for the exercise. He was a respectable racer at the club level, but going against Curt Oetking he might have been over his head. After all, they had just thrown up the mast with only a rough tune and put new untested sails on. So they double checked the J's tune and trim, switched drivers, and the same thing happened again! The buzz when they came off the water was they knew Mr Bill's Dog was going to be a VERY fast little boat. It seemed for next few years Mr Bill was practically unbeatable in Mini-ton regattas. The boat was mind-blowingly fast and there were several top level sailors on board. I remember they came back from winning another major regatta and not only did they get straight bullets but they lead at every single mark. By the last race there were several boats dumping on MBD before the start so they started in the back of the fleet. They tacked to clear air, split from the fleet and rounded the windward mark first again!

I had always thought if I every stumbled across MBD I would want to bring back it to terrorize some unsuspecting fleet racers with measurement ratings that could not capture the speed potential. Unfortunately I have just memories of her glory days and no leads on where the boat ended up. I hope you find her in good shape. It would be a nice tribute to your father's memory as well as good piece of floating sailing history to see MDB sailing again. Be sure to bring back the MBD battle cry too: "OOOOhhhhh Nooooo, Mister Bill!!!"

 

sirstopher

Member
437
0
I have a good deal of 8m video of her sailing in several regattas. One of the stories was on Grand Lake dad would have to start behind the 1 tons, always came home with silverware...... I know the last time I looked at the baot it had been painted RED and ports were installed on the cabin top. I would just like to see her again, OH and the shit my dad got for naming a boat a dog?

Keep up the stories, and if anyone knows where Curt is have him PM me, I think he was down in Corpus.

 
It's odd to run across posts about people/boats/places that are local to me on here. Mr. Bill's Dog was indeed one fast little dude. Saw it go down in Dallas. The MS Regatta at Windycrest was a great event years ago, but I haven't thought about it since. Thanks for the reminder. I want to get over there this year. Vernon, find me a ride if I don't bring mine. Great post and hope Chris can find everything he's looking for.

 




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