Multi 23 Question

Central NY Sailor

New member
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1
We have a new to us Multi 23 trimaran.  It did not come with a forestay.  It is equipped with a Karver furler for the jib.  Can I use a textile forestay?  I am in the process of ordering new cap shrouds from Colligo and wanted to use the same stuff for the fore-stay.  7mm Colligo Dux for the shrouds and forestay.  I could also use their torque rope for the foretay - that might be better for chafe? The boat will be moored the in water for our sailing season which is about 4 months.

Thanks for any advice the hive can provide.

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,745
392
Benicia, CA
Are you sure that furler is for the forestay and not for the code zero?  Regardless, though; you probably want some sort of torque rope.  Most small tris get away with wire and furl with single line furler so it furls in the direction of the wire twist so the torque transmission is good.  Colligo will give good advice.

 
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munt

Super Anarchist
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Somehow my name was altered by one letter..? But I'm happy to give bad advice. If you're using Colligo you already have a top-of-the-line expert at your beck and call, their work is magnificent.
 

hobiedd97

Member
51
20
Virginia
I was looking to purchase a Multi 23 a while back, and I heard something about poor behavior on a mooring. I don't recall the details, but I think it had something to do with the dihedral and rocking from side to side. That didn't discourage me, but someone else got the boat first. You may be able to find someone with personal experience with one on a mooring.
 

Sailabout

Super Anarchist
I was looking to purchase a Multi 23 a while back, and I heard something about poor behavior on a mooring. I don't recall the details, but I think it had something to do with the dihedral and rocking from side to side. That didn't discourage me, but someone else got the boat first. You may be able to find someone with personal experience with one on a mooring.
they are structurally very light, you wouldnt want to put one on a mooring that sees any wash.
 

munt

Super Anarchist
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I'd say the boat would be working very hard on a mooring. It will always be attempting to sail and can sail very hard just on its own windage. Yes, it will be flopping back and forth due to dihedral. Handling her by myself for several years at the launchramp/dock was sometimes very challenging. Think of it as an angry cheetah in a small cage. And yes, I do bear a striking resemblance to the Tiger King.
 

Tomfl

Member
As someone with a passing interest in small tris in general and the Multi23 in particular I am wondering about the issue of problems with dihedral on a mooring or at anchor. One of the reasons I am looking at a small tri is to take it camping for weekends (or a little longer) on barrier islands on Florida's west coast. Would putting a loaded ice chest and some jerry cans of water/fuel on one ama help with the sailing and flogging at anchor or on a ball?.
 

Central NY Sailor

New member
4
1
Thanks for the comments everyone. We previously moored an f28r in the same place and it worked well. It was odd that the boat was the busiest in light winds. Once the wind reached around 8-10 knots the boat settled down and became more settled as the wind increased. I will report back once we get the M23 sorted and launched.

For Munt: did you have any trouble with the shroud attachment points? Ours look fine in that there are no signs of distress in the surrounding fiberglass, but there isn't an inspection port anywhere near to make a careful visual inspection of what is happening below deck.

Secondly, how stable was yours on the trailer? It doesn't look like I will be able to assemble on the trailer without keeping some sort of support below each ama which will make backing the boat into the water interesting.
 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
62,250
5,468
De Nile
On mine, I could trailer it around the yard to and from the crane. I did support each ama while stored. I believe she's gonna flippity flop at a mooring... good luck, lots of fun to sail that boat, but she's definitely a handful...
 

munt

Super Anarchist
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The belt
As far as structural issues, as I've said many times, mine was horribly built but maybe if it hasn't broken yet it's ok? Being on a mooring I'd guess you'll be putting lots of repeated shock loads on the structure as the boat will be constantly trying to sail, tacking and jibing with the hulls flopping accordingly. Adding a bunch of weight to one side would (imho) only increase the shocks. On the trailer I always tied each forward aka to the trailer with a trucker's hitch. Just my opinion, but the boat is not robust enough nor designed for being on a mooring or even full time on an end tie. I can tell you that myself being a relatively strapping lump of flesh, if the wind was over about 25 kts. moving the boat around the dock or getting it on the trailer by myself was extremely difficult. Very light and lots of windage. You have good experience with the F28 so that's a positive. Best wishes!
 

LionIsland

Member
371
94
Pittwater
Having owned one on a trailer and living close by to one other that is moored here I can say this.
1) Yes to string forestay on the jib furler.
Bloody handy. Of course if you’re leaving the jib furled on the mooring you might want to pull a UV zippered sock over it with the screecher halyard or put sunstop in the leech. Forestay tension comes from sidestay tension but I found you don’t want to go too ballistic on rig tension with the rotating mast. Also I must say I did put some string cap stays to the mast to support the mast head kite. If you forget to introduce full rotation and load up the kite with out cap stays then…well…there’ll be tears.
And I put little snubbing winches on. You’d be surprised how much screecher and kite loads up the sheets. Or maybe we’re just wimps.
Talking M23 jibs I reckon it could have benefited from a significantly bigger jib. Yes you can go upwind with the screecher but for two sail races the little self tacker with the forestay mounted so far aft from the bow was underdone, me thinks.

2) Thé nearby permanently moored M23 does just fine on it’s mooring. And had been doing so for years. Not even sure if he uses a bridle although that’s the usual thing on a multi so that it doesn’t sail all around the anchorage.
In the case of the M23 it seems like he weights one float so that it doesn’t flip flop from float to float. You’d bridle between the main hull and the weighted float of course. Doesn’t take much weight out there to keep it down. A water canister, a petrol tank or bag would do it. Or out board of course.

A13736C2-ED17-4BCD-A659-9809D2A645E8.jpeg
 
Another (less orthodox) option for mooring (or anchoring) is to moor stern-first.

It's counterintuitive but it was the go-to approach on Lakota, an ORMA 60 tri with significant dihedral as well (plus a big wing mast). The boat didn't sail as much around stern-first compared to bow-first (my guess due to the shape of the hulls and rear beam blocking the wind, creating drag instead of lift). Also reversing stern-first under engine provides much better steering control to reach the mooring in any wind (so long as your reverse gear has enough oomph). Worth trying on a multi 23, of course YMMV.
 

LionIsland

Member
371
94
Pittwater
Seems like the local M23 owner just keeps it simple. And he’s no pleb and I don’t recall seeing it sail all over the shop so maybe simple is sweet.
Btw. I always wanted that spunky little bow sprit. Definitely would help to get the kite forward a bit of the screecher.

CC79B2F8-2AEE-48E7-A543-3D92C25D259E.jpeg
 
So as long as there are a few way and far-away more experienced Beach Cat sailors here
And if I might go off thread a fair ways....
I've located a M23 in excellent condition that is significantly upgraded, aluminum trailer, custom Colligo stuff, new prod, custom foils, carbon this and that, 2-1/2 almost new sets of sails, a canting rig (that I'd never use), lots of stuff, maybe too much stuff.
He's willing to sell at $18,500 USD and it's immaculate.
I've found a good launching site so the pebble/rock beach is avoided.
What are these boats worth... There's another average condition one I've found for $5000 less.
What do folks feel these are worth?
 
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munt

Super Anarchist
1,226
241
The belt
Yes for floaties under amas! Great idea. Maybe some extra large pool noodles with some bungee run through them so you could loop them over the amas? Might be some way to incorporate a jetski floating dock into the equation? If it keeps a jetski off the water it's a win win. My buddy kept his M23 on an inflatable floating dock in mdr and it worked amazingly well. The amount of cleaning, sanding and painting you have to do on 3 bottoms when they're in the water 24/7 is ball-busting. When I got mine it had a dried-on layer of lake scum that required endless hours of scrubbing with chemicals, sweat and elbow grease in abundance.
 

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