My 111 is really, really wet...

George Dewey

Super Anarchist
2,071
118
Charleston, SC
I see water coming in past the mast partners, and water coming in through the bowsprit sleeve. I don't see any leaking ports or hatches or anywhere else water is coming in. We sailed a 60nm race this weekend, started dry, and after no rain and just 3 foot seas, had plenty of water on board, to the point where some even got into the battery cases. 

Regarding the bowsprit, I'm told that it is expected to come into the sleeve and fall into the anchor locker and drain off the boat from there. It does seem that there is some kind of seal but we see water draining out of it inside the vee berth.

Is this normal or can I stop it?

Thanks...

 

PeterRoss

Member
215
45
Rhode Island
 George (J) lift the lid look inside that anchor locker above and outboard the pole tube. Whoever built the 109's had a bad habit of neglecting to glass the hard to access areas. That is, no attempt whatsoever to seal the tube yielding large gaps at hull/flange. On port tack the anchor locker fills and doesn't drain so fast. Water enters the boat at the gap behind the tube. In one case it ran aft to BMax and heavily stained the cherry ceiling strips in main cabin. The owner was in disbelief the interior damage came from a gap the size of your fist in the anchor locker.

 Those 109 style anchor locker leaks will send water aft inside the boats quickly

 
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Blur

Super Anarchist
1,217
210
Sweden
Were you sure that the boat was completely dry (i e lifted all the floorboard, and dried out every small compartment). It's not uncommon to have a "dry boat" and then heel over to find water was stuck inside the structure and everywhere else. Like the damn nav seat  :unsure:

From what you're describing you might have another issue. Not sure if US and Euro boats are different, but our sprit is almost dry. Maybe 2-3 liters after a 600 nm race. We even made a cover to put over the sprit for really rough upwind races as well as sealing the anchor locker with Sikaflex (collects lots of water in big seas).

Maybe a new seal would do the trick?

The big thing for us is waves getting down the companionway and wet sails and gear. Otherwise we've managed to get the boat very dry.

 
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George Dewey

Super Anarchist
2,071
118
Charleston, SC
 George (J) lift the lid look inside that anchor locker above and outboard the pole tube. Whoever built the 109's had a bad habit of neglecting to glass the hard to access areas. That is, no attempt whatsoever to seal the tube yielding large gaps at hull/flange.
Thank you Peter I'll check that.

 

George Dewey

Super Anarchist
2,071
118
Charleston, SC
Were you sure that the boat was completely dry (i e lifted all the floorboard, and dried out every small compartment). It's not uncommon to have a "dry boat" and then heel over to find water was stuck inside the structure and everywhere else. Like the damn nav seat  :unsure:

From what you're describing you might have another issue. Not sure if US and Euro boats are different, but our sprit is almost dry. Maybe 2-3 liters after a 600 nm race. We even made a cover to put over the sprit for really rough upwind races as well as sealing the anchor locker with Sikaflex (collects lots of water in big seas).

Maybe a new seal would do the trick?

The big thing for us is waves getting down the companionway and wet sails and gear. Otherwise we've managed to get the boat very dry.


Actually just a few weeks ago I took up a floor board to run a wire, and found water was not draining. So, I took them all up and unclogged the weep holes that connect them all. The water started to dain reasonably well. True I didn't check under each board before this race, but I did check the bilge and it was dry. 

I'll check the seals and the anchor locker carefully, sounds like you and Peter are thinking about the same area for water intrusion. This race, the companionway was not the issue. It was not very rough at all. Thanks!

 

George Dewey

Super Anarchist
2,071
118
Charleston, SC
Thanks everyone. 

Does this look right, or should those partners be pushed down closer to the deck? (I have no idea why it's upside down and couldn't figure out how to rotate it). 

IMG_3334.JPG

 
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neuronz

Anarchist
881
75
europe
There are elastic tapes to seal the mast at the partners. We have had good experience using it. Some boats also have a neoprene cover, but that has to be put on the mast before stepping.

Also if you have issues with water entering through the bowsprit housing, you might want to close the front of the bowsprit with a ball or whatever fits. It is by far the biggest opening of the housing.

 

ZeeZee

Member
177
12
On my boat the mast is sealed at the partners with a lot (and I mean a lot) of self vulcanizing tape. This has been completely watertight.

If the boat has been on the dock and it has rained a lot,  there is water in the bilge which entered via the mast openings of the halyards.

When sailing there is water entering via the sprit.  I don't think this is because it enters via the front seal in the bow (yes, waters enter through it,  but it will fall down in the anchor locker).  I believe waters is flushed over the anchor locker at the deck (when sailing on port tack).  From there it falls on the sprint beneath it and then enters through the sprit seal in the bulkhead onto the v-berth.   I plan to solve this by making a kind of "roof" above the sprit inside the anchor locker.  This way the water will not fall onto the sprit but will fall on the roof and then drain into the bottom of the locker.   Of course, sealing the locker with Sika is even better,  but maybe something you don't want at all time.

 

JMOD

Super Anarchist
1,174
91
Netherlands
seal it. looks like you have no mast collar. seal it with Vulcatape, and have a mast collar made. fix the mast collar with the spanners.

 

Crash

Super Anarchist
4,985
945
SoCal
seal it. looks like you have no mast collar. seal it with Vulcatape, and have a mast collar made. fix the mast collar with the spanners.
Looks like there used to be a neoprene mast collar, as evidenced by the 2 large “hose” clamps lying at the base of the mast???

 

George Dewey

Super Anarchist
2,071
118
Charleston, SC
I did some googling I see what you all mean about the mast collar / boot. I'll start with that the vulcanized tape and boot, thanks. 

Should the partners be tapped in further, or is it normal for them to stick up like that?

 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,289
893
San Diego
How far down do they go? It's all about the surface area contacting the mast wall & partner ring. If you have full contact then they are OK sticking up

 

Crash

Super Anarchist
4,985
945
SoCal
What longy said.  It's not unusual for the chocks to stick up above deck like that.  You do want full contact with the mast and partner ring to the depth of the partners.  Its also ok for them to stick out the bottom some.  Its not ok if they are only partial down.

 

Blur

Super Anarchist
1,217
210
Sweden
I have no idea why it's upside down
This could be the reason you have water coming in  :lol:  

I laminated a note that's useful offshore as well "Keel down, mast up" 

On the partners, ideally they spread the load equally on deck/collar. Euro boats has a full "collar" in hard foam that slides on to the mast and starts 10 mm above the deck fitting and ends 10 mm below the deck in the cabin. Bigger version of the J/80 part below. Attention to details.

SparcraftMastWedgeS80J80_01.w1220.h1220.fill.wm.0878f6.jpg


 
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G

Guest

Guest
Ill second the self amalgamating tape, stopped all my collar leaks. Don't over stretch it and use plenty 

 
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