My sons $1 dollar boat gets a re-fit.

Cruisin Loser

Super Anarchist
The old finish on these bunk fiddles didn't stand a chance against these strong arms. 



I could see Edith was anxious to dip a brush in the varnish. She said, with a smile, as she brushed on the first coat, "This is so satisfying"

But then she knew it would be, this was not her first time with sandpaper and a paintbrush. 
When my wife was 40 she could do 12 pull-ups, that's pretty much what her arms and shoulders looked like. Then we had another kid.....

While your kids are doing something useful, that son we had in our 40's is doing stuff like this (when he's not writing algorithms to test banking software for security holes).




 

Windward

Super Anarchist
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And when they get to our age the younger generations will blame them for everything that is wrong with the world. :D
You bet!   Their kids will sure look at this photo with wonder.  What in the heck are mom and dad doing?  Labor?  Where is the remote and controller?  

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,586
2,877
Edgewater, MD
@Kris Cringle I *totally* agree with that philosophy. It's one reason why all my repairs and restorations take so long.

I'm not a "pure fettler" like the Samson guy, nor am I a "pure sailor" like Dylan.  I enjoy the satisfaction of a repair well done but I sure do like to enjoy the fruits of my labor by going sailing.

 

py26129

Super Anarchist
2,822
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Montreal
Kris, great thread.  Reminds me of my daughter and her boyfriend  having a blast on a $600 CAD (close enough to $1) tanzer 22.

At the risk of derailing the thread, I have to ask about the Island Packet in the pic above?  Did someone really add an aft cabin?

That's got to be an illusion but I can't tell.

 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
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Kris, great thread.  Reminds me of my daughter and her boyfriend  having a blast on a $600 CAD (close enough to $1) tanzer 22.

At the risk of derailing the thread, I have to ask about the Island Packet in the pic above?  Did someone really add an aft cabin?

That's got to be an illusion but I can't tell.
Good eye, I was struck by the sight of the IP in the 'back lot'.

I saw that boat about 10 years ago and even took some pictures as it was unusual. I think there was some media about this 'customizing'.

 I believe it was stretched and either a few feet were added to the stern, or it was cut aft somewhere and a filler section glassed in. I think it was professionally done and looked it at the time. 

I'm not sure what was added below as I didn't get aboard. I'm guessing or recalling it may have had two berths with footwell under the cockpit. Could be a couple stiffs below, it's been sitting for a few years. 

In hindsight, was this 'customizing' a good idea? Apparently not as it's now in the 'back row' of this local yard.   

 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
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@Kris Cringle I *totally* agree with that philosophy. It's one reason why all my repairs and restorations take so long.

I'm not a "pure fettler" like the Samson guy, nor am I a "pure sailor" like Dylan.  I enjoy the satisfaction of a repair well done but I sure do like to enjoy the fruits of my labor by going sailing.
I'm with you. My boat is high maintenance but it sails every season. I could never own a project boat that spent even one season on the hard, due to projects. The boat is a means to a more important end, being on the water. 

I think my son has even less interest in any work beyond making this boat a little more fun to sail. I'm good with that. He's learning a ton his way. 

I believe denial is a great tool for builders, makers, doers or DIY boat owners. I don't allow myself to dwell much beyond pounding the next nail. 

 

Bull City

Bull City
6,938
2,585
North Carolina
Working on a hard-to-love boat, is drudgery.
Kris, with all respect, I don't think that an O'Day Outlaw is a hard-to-love boat.

image.png

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
66,979
11,483
Great Wet North
Good eye, I was struck by the sight of the IP in the 'back lot'.

I saw that boat about 10 years ago and even took some pictures as it was unusual. I think there was some media about this 'customizing'.

 I believe it was stretched and either a few feet were added to the stern, or it was cut aft somewhere and a filler section glassed in. I think it was professionally done and looked it at the time. 

I'm not sure what was added below as I didn't get aboard. I'm guessing or recalling it may have had two berths with footwell under the cockpit. Could be a couple stiffs below, it's been sitting for a few years. 

In hindsight, was this 'customizing' a good idea? Apparently not as it's now in the 'back row' of this local yard.  
I've seen worse.

https://www.usedvictoria.com/classified-ad/Pacific-30_35667170

image.png

This is what it's supposed to look like

image.png

 
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Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
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13 hours ago, Bull City said:
Kris, with all respect, I don't think that an O'Day Outlaw is a hard-to-love boat.

View attachment 362611
It shouldn't be a hard to love boat,  bull.

I think the design is near perfect for our typical use. But that huge locker you see aft fills with 30-50 or more gallons of rainwater during a 1" summer storm. Everything in it is soaked and in fact, awash. And then as you head below, you see the cabin sole floating, and yes,...the battery top is below the slosh. Those are problems that I believe may have been exacerbated by the builder. 

A good boat if nothing else should stay reasonably dry at mooring and provide basic shelter, like the roof on your house. I think once we have that, it may be an easier boat to love.

THEN it may take on a different status. I hope so, it could be a great restoration for someone who wants a beautiful daysailer for pennies to the dollar compared to what is custom designed and built today. 

I took this photo some years before we aquirred SKAL. I was out on my boat after a good rainstorm. The boatyard was checking boats when I noticed they tied up to SKAL. You can see from her bow skyward attitude, she's taken a couple hundred pounds of rain in that aft locker. The yard pumped her out. To this day, that previous owner never knew why the boat would start sinking during some conditions and not others. He now owns a beautifully restored and maintained Alburg 30. A furniture craftsmen, he's all thumbs on a boat. 

SKAL sinking in 2008.jpg

 
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Bull City

Bull City
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2,585
North Carolina
A good boat if nothing else should stay reasonably dry at mooring and provide basic shelter, like the roof on your house. I think once we have that, it may be an easier boat to love.

THEN it may take on a different status. I hope so, it could be a great restoration for someone who wants a beautiful daysailer for pennies to the dollar compared to what is custom designed and built today. 
Kris, I see your point. Makes perfect sense. 

 
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