Name that navlight ("blinkenlights fun"?)

zedboy

Member
257
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Eastern Med
So we're fed up with winter and we're relocating this summer to an unnamed country on the eastern med starting with "i". Of course, first things first, before we have an apartment rented or job or schools sorted, I got on the bone with a nice South African lady from a sailing club to find out about joining, and she asks me what kind of certs I have. Uh, an Ontario boating license? Yeah right, that's not going to fly - I have to take like 6 exams covering coastal nav, electronic nav, mechanical, local maritime law & habours, plus one exam covering day shapes and one covering nav lights. I imagine a CG license over here would cover similar stuff.

Fortunately their Ministry of Transportation publishes sample question banks for each exam, and a cute supplement with 75 sample navlights and 16 day shapes ... I printed out the nav lights and made flash cards. My colregs reference is Wikipedia (is that a dumb idea?): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ColRegs#Part_C_-_Lights_and_shapes

Most of them I can figure out pretty easily, for example:

navlights1.jpg


49 is a vessel constrained by draft, underway to port. 50 is a vessel with restricted manoeuvreability, engaged in underwater operations approaching and showing safe passage to its port (viewer's stb'd). 51 is a vessel trawling underway stb'd.

But what's this:

navlights2.jpg
?

A vessel under pilot, underway to port showing no safe passage on port side for some reason? Didn't seem obvious to me that lights were meant to be combined that way. Or is it a vessel under pilot, but not under command (is that a contradiction)?

And this:

navlights3.jpg
?

A vessel fishing (not trawling) underway approaching, but why the extra green light to the vessel's port (viewer's stb'd)? A white all-around there would show equipment/outrigger on that side ... what's this?

And this:

navlights4.jpg
?

A power-vessel to viewer's port underway approaching hip-towing a sailing vessel?

 

floating dutchman

Super Anarchist
63 is a side by side tow (or a yacht overtaking a tug :p )

You seem to have "trawling" and "fishing other that trawling" around the wrong way (green over white vs red over white).

51 is fishing other than trawling, and not under way (where is the steaming light?)

A bit of a guess but I think 57 is a pilot boat (viewed from stb) drifting and waiting for the ship (yea, not the most bestest way to put it I know)

Another guess, 68 could be a fishing boat (trawler & viewed fro the bow) stuck fast (you can find out what it means for a trawler to be "fast" all by your self)

A note about 50, the red over red and the green over green are visible 360deg, pass on the side with the two greens.

I should do one of these courses one of these days.

 
57: I agree that the white over red is a pilot boat, but if the boat is underway shouldn't there be a sternlight? If the vessel is simply drifting while waiting to meet up with the boat/cruise ship/whatever, then should it still have on its side lights? According to Rule 30: the two vertical lights can also represent a boat aground .

(d) A vessel aground shall exhibit the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) or
(B of this Rule and in addition, where they can best be seen:
(i) two all-round red lights in a vertical line
 
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floating dutchman

Super Anarchist
Red lady, the stern light is never visible side on, what I believe the card it trying to show, the missing light is the steaming light (or mast head, if you call it that).

Also if a power boat stops it's engines it becomes a "sail boat", a drifting power boat should carry the same lights as a yacht, normally this would mean that the power boat would simply turn of the steaming light. You switch to anchor light when you anchor, drifting or sailing, no difference in lights carried. .. I think...

FD

edit, you got me on the being aground, cannot remember, but red over red is "not under command" that could mean "I'm aground" or "I've gone to bed" (illegal) or I'd guess "I'm drifting".

2nd edit, red over red can also mean "my steering just shat it self"

 
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Red lady, the stern light is never visible side on, what I believe the card it trying to show, the missing light is the steaming light (or mast head, if you call it that).

Also if a power boat stops it's engines it becomes a "sail boat", a drifting power boat should carry the same lights as a yacht, normally this would mean that the power boat would simply turn of the steaming light. You switch to anchor light when you anchor, drifting or sailing, no difference in lights carried. .. I think...

FD

edit, you got me on the being aground, cannot remember, but red over red is "not under command" that could mean "I'm aground" or "I've gone to bed" (illegal) or I'd guess "I'm drifting".

2nd edit, red over red can also mean "my steering just shat it self"
You know, I got so hung up on the red over red that I wasn't thinking about the angle that the vessel is being seen from. So it could be a pilot boat that has lost control of its ability to steer and is drifting?

 

Presuming Ed

Super Anarchist
11,019
180
London, UK
Also if a power boat stops it's engines it becomes a "sail boat", a drifting power boat should carry the same lights as a yacht, normally this would mean that the power boat would simply turn of the steaming light. You switch to anchor light when you anchor, drifting or sailing, no difference in lights carried. .. I think...
A power driven vessel with engines that can work is a power driven vessel. If engines are disabled, then it's NUC.

3 (a) The word “vessel” includes every description of water craft, including non-displacement craft, wing-in-ground-effect (WIG) vehicle, and seaplanes, used or capable of being used as a means of transportation on water.

b] The term “power-driven vessel” means any vessel propelled by machinery.

c] The term “sailing vessel” means any vessel under sail provided that propelling machinery, if fitted, is not being used.

.

.

.

(f) The term “vessel not under command” means a vessel which through some exceptional circumstance is unable to manoeuvre as required by these Rules and is therefore unable to keep out of the way of another vessel.

Once you've cast off, you're underway.

(i) The word “underway” means that a vessel is not at anchor, or made fast to the shore, or aground.

A drifting powerboat is still a powerboat - assuming her engines aren't disabled - so should be showing steaming light, sidelights and stern light.

 
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zedboy

Member
257
0
Eastern Med
So 57 is a sail vessel NUC under pilot?

Yeah I had fishing/trawling backwards.

Still puzzled by 68 but wouldn't put it past the test-writers to put a trick picture, they like questions like "What is the vessel shown in image 68?" and the correct answer is "D - none of the above" because it's an invalid light configuration. Will have to go through the several hundred questions in the pool to see if that image is mentioned anywhere (and no, the PDFs are not searchable :p ).

 

zedboy

Member
257
0
Eastern Med
Of course, the best of it all is then translating all terms into Hebrew. Winner so far: מכמורתן, a trawler. Google translate comes up with "McMorton" because all fisherman are Scottish right?

But the root מכמורת for a fishing net actually appears in Ezekiel (totally random that I happened to find it).

 

Presuming Ed

Super Anarchist
11,019
180
London, UK
So 57 is a sail vessel NUC under pilot?

Yeah I had fishing/trawling backwards.

Still puzzled by 68 but wouldn't put it past the test-writers to put a trick picture, they like questions like "What is the vessel shown in image 68?" and the correct answer is "D - none of the above" because it's an invalid light configuration. Will have to go through the several hundred questions in the pool to see if that image is mentioned anywhere (and no, the PDFs are not searchable :p ).
I've always had it as pilot boats, not boats under pilot. I.e, one of these. And lights only lit when on pilotage operations.

1099029.jpg


AFAIAA, there isn't a lighting scheme for a ship under pilot. International code flag H means "I have a pilot onboard". Wonder slightly why pilot boats need lighting identification - I suppose it's so that ships can call them up "Hi. We're the ship bearing 263 from your position". Less necessary in these days of AIS.

And again, AFAIAA, pilot boats exhibit only one white all around light (and one red).

wp3cbbf40f_05_06.jpg


So I would say that 57 is, in theory, a vessel engaged on pilotage duty, but not under command. But to me, it's a bit nonsensical, as you can't really be engaged on pilotage duty if NUC, and they would switch off the white over red (Pilot's ahead) if NUC.

I'm foxed by 68.

 
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Slow day at work, so here is what I've come up with:

57: Vessel constrained by draft, less than 50m in length - now this pic would be bow on but same idea I think. I got this from usboating.com while searching the interwebs.

68: Could be a Fishing vessel that is trawling and casting a net.....???

Vessel constrained by draft, less than 50 meters in length

30a.gif


 

Whinging Pom

Super Anarchist
Is 57 a pilot boat but off station? There are some other odd ones like the signals for a lightship off station. Hands up those who have spotted a minesweeper with her three greens in a triangle.

Beware of USN carriers, they have four flashing greens at the aft end of the flight deck. Very confusing!

 

Presuming Ed

Super Anarchist
11,019
180
London, UK
PE, I'd expect a drifting power boat to turn off the steaming light if they are not steaming. And why doesn't your pilot boat have a steaming light?

Anyway, I'm off to google land, to find 68.
Steaming light is a bit of a misnomer - officially, it's a masthead light, but I've always called it the steaming light. Getting into the difference between underway and making way. If underway but not making way, you still show the relevant lights. - I.e. the masthead white light, sidelights and stern light. Pilot boats don't have masthead light (shining over the same forward sectors as the sidelights) because they have the white over red all around lights instead - rule 29.

Fishing boats are supposed to show differing light schemes when making way and not making way (ie.e drifting) - they should switch off their sidelights and sternlight. Only fishing boats, thought - rule 26.

 
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