New Cubed - First Supermaxi Since Speedboat

tismith

New member
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Sydney
Ryan, can I ask what the use case is for these? I thought they were more likely to use an outrigger on a big overlapper, which would need to be a lot further back on the boat. What would you use it for on the smaller jibs? Sheeting angle for heavy reaching?

jib outriggers
 

Abbo

Super Anarchist
Yeah I know. And the only examples I gave were a multi national champion and a Brisbane to Gladstone winner.
Problem wasn't the people. It was a cultural difference in understanding between what 'modern racing multis' means to you and to me.
Agreed. I think you had more of a grand prix interpretation, pre-preg carbon style orma 60's, extreme 40's etc. (Note... you can't you cant even insure an extreme 40 in Australia. Kinda difficult to enter a race with no insurance.) I was thinking more what is actually out there winning races with in Australia in the past couple of years. You might call them heavy but I think the owners of them might punch you in the mouth for saying that! :) Both the examples I gave are fully stripped out racers.

 
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MPH

Super Anarchist
1,825
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NW
Sarc said:
Yeah I know. And the only examples I gave were a multi national champion and a Brisbane to Gladstone winner.
Problem wasn't the people. It was a cultural difference in understanding between what 'modern racing multis' means to you and to me.
Agreed. I think you had more of a grand prix interpretation, pre-preg carbon style orma 60's, extreme 40's etc. (Note... you can't you cant even insure an extreme 40 in Australia. Kinda difficult to enter a race with no insurance.) I was thinking more what is actually out there winning races with in Australia in the past couple of years. You might call them heavy but I think the owners of them might punch you in the mouth for saying that! :) Both the examples I gave are fully stripped out racers.
It's really not relevant that those boats are uninsurable in Australia...As we've discussed before Australia isn't the center of the world, particularly when it comes to Multihulls..France is where we all look to when we talk modern racing multis and they certainly aren't flying loose luffed kites on their MOD 70's.
 

MR.CLEAN

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Yeah I know. And the only examples I gave were a multi national champion and a Brisbane to Gladstone winner.
Problem wasn't the people. It was a cultural difference in understanding between what 'modern racing multis' means to you and to me.
Agreed. I think you had more of a grand prix interpretation, pre-preg carbon style orma 60's, extreme 40's etc. (Note... you can't you cant even insure an extreme 40 in Australia. Kinda difficult to enter a race with no insurance.) I was thinking more what is actually out there winning races with in Australia in the past couple of years. You might call them heavy but I think the owners of them might punch you in the mouth for saying that! :) Both the examples I gave are fully stripped out racers.
Yeah, since we were talking about maxis I sort of had 'modern' synonymous with 'big', which means 'french' and that means no puffy kites. But if we're talking 40' and under, of course soft kites are useful, and the closer they get to monohull SA/d numbers, the more useful!

 
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MR.CLEAN

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you can't you cant even insure an extreme 40 in Australia. Kinda difficult to enter a race with no insurance.
didn't seem to bother these guys. unless you're talking about that handicap shit again? :p

yandy120494.jpg


 

Abbo

Super Anarchist
you can't you cant even insure an extreme 40 in Australia. Kinda difficult to enter a race with no insurance.
didn't seem to bother these guys. unless you're talking about that handicap shit again? :p

yandy120494.jpg
Special event, insurance is all bundled up by the organiser, controlled risk etc. Try to insure one for a Saturday afternoon race on Pittwater or Sydney harbour. Good luck with that.

What's wrong with Handicap sailing anyway? Not everyone is lucky enough to own a boat that has a local fleet of identical boats. How are they supposed to have any fun? Or should they just pony up and join in the arms race for line honours.

 
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Abbo

Super Anarchist
Sarc said:
Yeah I know. And the only examples I gave were a multi national champion and a Brisbane to Gladstone winner.
Problem wasn't the people. It was a cultural difference in understanding between what 'modern racing multis' means to you and to me.
Agreed. I think you had more of a grand prix interpretation, pre-preg carbon style orma 60's, extreme 40's etc. (Note... you can't you cant even insure an extreme 40 in Australia. Kinda difficult to enter a race with no insurance.) I was thinking more what is actually out there winning races with in Australia in the past couple of years. You might call them heavy but I think the owners of them might punch you in the mouth for saying that! :) Both the examples I gave are fully stripped out racers.
It's really not relevant that those boats are uninsurable in Australia...As we've discussed before Australia isn't the center of the world, particularly when it comes to Multihulls..France is where we all look to when we talk modern racing multis and they certainly aren't flying loose luffed kites on their MOD 70's.
Farrrk me, I thought we had covered this?

Sarc, how can you possibly tell me what's relevant to MY arguement? Insurance is entirely relevant to my arguement, you guys are using extreme 40's as examples of racing multi's that only use straight luffs. Those boats are so fucking radical that the average man can't even get insurance to do a saturday afternoon race around the bay at your local multi hull club. Hardly indicative of the general racing scene are they? The plain simple fact is there are plenty of very successful racing multi hull's out there who use loose luffed sails to great effect. So IT IS ABSOLUTELY open to debate, (as per my original statement that got all you bone heads worked up) end of fucking story.

Mod 70's orma 60's and extreme 40's are all extremely expensive, extremely delicate grand prix machines and whilst also being extremely awesome and cool there are about as irrelevant and out of reach to the average multi sailor as a formula one car is to you average weekend warrior at your local race track.

 
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MR.CLEAN

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What's wrong with Handicap sailing anyway? Not everyone is lucky enough to own a boat that has a local fleet of identical boats. How are they supposed to have any fun? Or should they just pony up and join in the arms race for line honours.
Quit taking the bait! That was for GybeSet! Answer is of course that handicap racing is great if it is all you have, but never as fun as racing equal boats.

 

MR.CLEAN

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Mod 70's orma 60's and extreme 40's are all extremely expensive, extremely delicate grand prix machines and whilst also being extremely awesome and cool there are about as irrelevant and out of reach to the average multi sailor as a formula one car is to you average weekend warrior at your local race track.
You can pick up a late 90's ORMA for about what it costs to get a late 90's shitter F-1 car, or around 300k Euro.

 

Just A Skosh

Super Anarchist
1,387
67
New Hampshire
Mod 70's orma 60's and extreme 40's are all extremely expensive, extremely delicate grand prix machines and whilst also being extremely awesome and cool there are about as irrelevant and out of reach to the average multi sailor as a formula one car is to you average weekend warrior at your local race track.
You can pick up a late 90's ORMA for about what it costs to get a late 90's shitter F-1 car, or around 300k Euro.
I think this looks cooler: http://www.race-cars.com/carsales/brabham/1392145483/1392145483ss.htm

 

Icedtea

Super Anarchist
But Gybeset- considering the fact that the people who buy maxi's want to go as fast as possible through the most prestigious races on the planet, you'd probably agree.

So would it be a bad thing if multis were allowed in these races?

You wouldn't like to see them go even faster?

 

Abbo

Super Anarchist
Mod 70's orma 60's and extreme 40's are all extremely expensive, extremely delicate grand prix machines and whilst also being extremely awesome and cool there are about as irrelevant and out of reach to the average multi sailor as a formula one car is to you average weekend warrior at your local race track.
You can pick up a late 90's ORMA for about what it costs to get a late 90's shitter F-1 car, or around 300k Euro.

Yeah I know cheap huh? But if you want to use it then it's 10x that amount per annum.

 
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