New flooring----what to install

sailman

Super Anarchist
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Portsmouth, RI
This winter I am going to take up the original teak and holly floor and replace it. I want the replacement to be easy to maintain and also easy to install. Would prefer not to poly or varnish the new flooring. What options are out there?

 

IStream

Super Anarchist
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When I bought my boat it had an artificial teak and laminate floor (3/4" ply covered with a decorative plastic layer) and one of my first thoughts was, "that's gotta go someday". However, after living with it I'm a convert. It's put up with an incredible amount of abuse (3 kids, 2 adults, and a dog living aboard for a year) and looks like the day I bought it, for better or worse. If you can find a similar material that you like the look of, it's a good way to go.

 

sailman

Super Anarchist
8,325
438
Portsmouth, RI
Yes cabin sole.

I have not seen the plasteek in person just online. Install looks easy enough but it would cover the screws holding down the 3/4 ply so any future work would be a shiteshow.

 
Raw teak is an excellent solution from an anti-slip and appearance standpoint - IF you have a way to periodically hose it down and scrub it clean. Between the engine, children and food droppings it will get oil stains and generally mungy. So it will need to be cleaned like an exterior teak deck to retain its beauty. It has always seemed stupid to put a smooth, slippery finish on a cabin sole that's going to be healed over, wet and leaping around in a seaway. For a synthetic product, you might look at Lonseal. They provide a number of different textures and patterns. Another choice might be Esthec. This is a synthetic product with a thin fiberglass backing. It is typically custom CNC cut, so you can either have a traditional planking look cut into it or any pattern that you might think up. Along with teak decks and floors, Teakdecking Systems in Florida also supplies this product. (they may also carry Lonseal...) Like any custom work, the cost will be more than something that you buy and apply yourself.

 

warbird

Super Anarchist
16,601
1,348
lake michigan
When I bought my boat it had an artificial teak and laminate floor (3/4" ply covered with a decorative plastic layer) and one of my first thoughts was, "that's gotta go someday". However, after living with it I'm a convert. It's put up with an incredible amount of abuse (3 kids, 2 adults, and a dog living aboard for a year) and looks like the day I bought it, for better or worse. If you can find a similar material that you like the look of, it's a good way to go.
My boat had a similar synthetic "teak" look flooring on the sole sections. Mine had a matte textured finish that was surprisingly good anti skid. Clean up was easy, the "look" was not garishly "plastic" and durabilty seemed excellent. The plywood below failed so we now have battleship grey nonskid plywood(easy to replace).If you use a synthetic flooring remeber that it,likely,will not breath so you may need air movement in,your bilges. We didn't and our plywood sections failed.

 
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Max Rockatansky

holy fuckfarts!
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22YO what looks like is probably Lonseal or equivalent laminated to foam (in the hulls). Not terribly pretty but is still serviceable. Do.Not.Put.Acrylic.Polymer*.On.Old.Laminate. don't ask how I know

*aka Future or Pledge Floor Care

That said, in the salon, the leaking companionway rotted its plywood underlayment. After fixing the companionway, I installed a 'marine weave' matting in mahogany/holly colors. Just dropped this mat right over the bridgedeck 'glass. This page has the stuff (scroll down) but isn't where I got it, think I got mine at 'Welcome Aboard' but it wasn't cheap

http://www.snapincarpet.com/products.cfm

Boat lost weight getting rid of the plywood and laminate. The matting is easy on the feet, no slip, easy to clean and if it gets wet I just pull it up and throw it on the nets to dry.

 
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sailman

Super Anarchist
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438
Portsmouth, RI
keeldude, I have used the Total Boat penetrating epoxy on a table that I made and the results were really nice. I will use it for the 3/4" ply underlayment on this project.

I ordered samples of the Lonseal, it looks like a good product. I have not found where I can purchase it on the East Coast, any ideas?

 

IStream

Super Anarchist
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3,042
I've seen multiple Nauticats with tile floors throughout, not just in the heads, which seemed to be factory standard on the 1980's models. I guess once you've gone the route of 40mm thick solid glass decks with 13mm of teak on top , you just say "fuck it" and go all the way with the horizontal surfaces.

 

sailman

Super Anarchist
8,325
438
Portsmouth, RI
Received some samples of the Lonseal product. It looks good, my one concern with it is that the core is white. So if something drops on it with enough force to nic it the white will show through. Price is comparable to veneer teak and holly. One option I was thinking about was doing the sealed 3/4" marine ply floor and then laying 1/2" teak and holly on top but not screwing it down. The 3/4" would be anchored to the framing, the 1/2" would float on top and trim pieces would keep it in place along the edges.

Thoughts?

 

C. Spackler

Member
463
58
Boat
keeldude, I have used the Total Boat penetrating epoxy on a table that I made and the results were really nice. I will use it for the 3/4" ply underlayment on this project.

I ordered samples of the Lonseal, it looks like a good product. I have not found where I can purchase it on the East Coast, any ideas?
Defender?

http://search.defender.com/?expression=Lonseal&s=1
We used Lonseal on the interior of our boat. It's very heavy, and I've found that you can't always get it clean. But it has it's positives, too.

 
I used COOSA bd. in a floor re-build.

Its 1/3 the weight of Plywood and cuts like butter.

Not cheep 4x8x 1/2' = $134/sheet.

You will need to glass it in though.

I add two layers of glass for impact resistance under a very hard non skip paint.

 

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