New Well, Smelly Water

cmonkey

Member
296
37
NW Virgina
We just moved into a new house in northern VA just west of Shenandoah National park. The new build house comes with a new well that produces crystal clear water with the smell of rotten eggs. the water passed all the bacteria testing and is safe to drink but.. I contacted Eco Water and they say they can fix it for me with an aeriation iron filter coupled with a water softener (yes we have hard water in this area) all this for $5,800. Now they are coming back saying we have bacterial iron sulfide which will require a chemical dosing tank (hydrogen peroxide) which will add another $2,500+ to the system. How hard is it to install this stuff on my own? You Tube makes it look fairly simple. Any advice is appreciated.
 

bridhb

Super Anarchist
3,755
1,106
Jax, FL
"Rotten egg" smell is usually H2S. It can effectively and cheaply be removed by aeration but the smell will be around your aerator. Here in Jax, our water plants with big splash tray aerators sometimes smell worse than our poopy water plants.
 

cmonkey

Member
296
37
NW Virgina
Very common in New England, with a new or old, but unused well; although I have not seen this in years. Put a gallon of bleach in the well, wait 24 hours and then run the water until clean and clear with no odor.

EDIT - How deep is the well? Drilled or pounded?
.
Well is 150 ft deep
 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
Well is 150 ft deep

Excellent! Follow my instructions and let us know how it worked? And yes, brid is correct about the H2S; the bleach will take care of that too. Once the bleach has killed all that and other stuff from being stagnant, and then flushed clean you should have no more problems, unless you close the house and don't use the water for an extended time period. Saw this exact problem happen with brand new wells more than once, years ago when my family was developing a subdivision and building new homes.

EDIT -Don't know what's required from your local health regs as to safe potable water, but you should test for PH, and Radon if you are in an area where radon is found. We have a neutralizer on our well water to raise the ph of the low ph, acidic, "hard water". And since our water and basement air tested high levels of radon, we had treatment systems for both installed when we moved in.
.
 
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Grande Mastere Dreade

Snag's spellchecker
EDIT -Don't know what's required from your local health regs as to safe potable water, but you should test for PH, and Radon if you are in an area where radon is found. We have a neutralizer on our well water to raise the ph of the low ph, acidic, "hard water". And since our water and basement air tested high levels of radon, we had treatment systems for both installed when we moved in.
.
and for heavy metals , organophosphates, e-coli etc..

not sure in the NE, we can send water samples to the ag extension for a water test for free..
 
D

Deleted member 149385

Guest
Very common in New England, with a new or old, but unused well; although I have not seen this in years. Put a gallon of bleach in the well, wait 24 hours and then run the water until clean and clear with no odor.

EDIT - How deep is the well? Drilled or pounded?
.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
this
 

Grande Mastere Dreade

Snag's spellchecker
State Ag Ext does soil testing for free, but I don't think they do water in CT? Cost is minimal at private labs.
.
regardless, get a good water test from whomever... it's good to get a baseline if it's nice and clean and if something comes along to contaminate it, you have history besides knowing what you are drinking..

in texas they've had wells get contaminated where people were able to light the water on fire as it came out of the faucet.. with the fracking going on and everything people are burying underground you'll never know what's in the water
 

Mrleft8

Super Anarchist
26,533
3,712
Suwanee River
First try dumping a few gallons of Clorox in the well over night, then flush the system. If that doesn't solve it (probably will) a reverse osmosis system will fix it. You're near Winchester, I gather, and the water there is generally considered excellent. New construction, especially in a "development" stirs up a lot of elements in the soil that normally are static, and they leach down to the aquifer where as normally they are at the surface water level.
 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
First try dumping a few gallons of Clorox in the well over night, then flush the system. If that doesn't solve it (probably will) a reverse osmosis system will fix it. You're near Winchester, I gather, and the water there is generally considered excellent. New construction, especially in a "development" stirs up a lot of elements in the soil that normally are static, and they leach down to the aquifer where as normally they are at the surface water level.

Did you not read post #2 - :unsure: :ROFLMAO:
.
 
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Get the water tested, hi iron content gives off the same smell, if you fill and set aside a clear glass full overnight and it turns a yellowish colour that's likely what it is. You have to know ppm to get a plan on how to treat it.
 

cmonkey

Member
296
37
NW Virgina
Thanks for all the advice, I will try the bleach method and let you know. We had another quote from a local water guy who has been dealing with this stuff for years. He recommended an aeriated filter tank with a water softener and said that would fix it, around $5,000. the PH is around 7.2 with iron definitely present and the water in our area is considered hard. SWMBO only drinks Fiji bottled water but would like the shower water to not smell.
 

Windward

Super Anarchist
4,653
724
Thanks for all the advice, I will try the bleach method and let you know. We had another quote from a local water guy who has been dealing with this stuff for years. He recommended an aeriated filter tank with a water softener and said that would fix it, around $5,000. the PH is around 7.2 with iron definitely present and the water in our area is considered hard. SWMBO only drinks Fiji bottled water but would like the shower water to not smell.
Well heck... there is your solution right there in front of you!

Shower in Fiji water. Flavored if you are feeling frisky.

*** Sheish. Why do I have to all the heavy lifting for you people.
 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
Thanks for all the advice, I will try the bleach method and let you know. We had another quote from a local water guy who has been dealing with this stuff for years. He recommended an aeriated filter tank with a water softener and said that would fix it, around $5,000. the PH is around 7.2 with iron definitely present and the water in our area is considered hard. SWMBO only drinks Fiji bottled water but would like the shower water to not smell.

I would get another opinion on the treatment system for iron. Your PH sounds fine at 7.2. Ours was much lower before neutralizing.
  • Acidic water has a pH lower than 7. Strongly acidic substances can have a pH of 0. Battery acid falls into this category.
  • Alkaline water has a pH of 8 or above. Strongly alkaline substances, such as lye, can have a pH of 14.
  • Pure water has a pH of 7 and is considered “neutral” because it has neither acidic nor basic qualities.
It may in fact cost 5 grand to treat for iron and other minerals, but the water should be very drinkable then. Our deep well water tastes great to drink. OTOH, we just spent a week on Block Island at a house with a shallow well, which is surface water, and the water was safe and potable, but tasted very earthy to me, so we bought bottled water to drink.

Acid Neutralizer Iron Filter​

Acid neutralizer iron filter units where one tank is used are often a marginal approach. The only time that it is a good idea is if you are CERTAIN that you have only red water iron. And no clear water iron. In addition, you may not have enough space to add an iron filter after the acid neutralizer for some reason. The proper approach if you have both iron issues and pH issues, is an act neutralizer followed by an iron filter. You really should not mix the minerals for both into one tank. This is a marginal approach often used by marginal water treatment dealers to create a lifetime of expensive service calls. Have one tank to raise the pH. And then have another tank to remove iron, sulfur, manganese etc. Or use a dual tank system like the one below to save water and be the most efficient when cleaning itself. The unit is fully automatic.

Dual Purpose Tanks

We do sell a twin tank system where one tank is the acid neutralizer and the other is an iron filter. The first tank raises the pH. That allows the second tank to remove iron, sulfur, manganese, rust, dirt, sediment and chemicals. The best iron filter for the second tank is our Popular Terminox® Iron, sulfur and manganese filter. It requires not salt or chemicals or maintenance. So all you ever have to do with this premium filter is add a little mineral to the Acid Neutralizer tank every year or so. How often depends on how low the pH is, how big the tank is and how much water you use. The average for most customers when the tank is properly sized is about once per year. The cost for the replacement minerals usually cost $25 to $35.
acid neutralizer iron filter
These units are very efficient and fairly inexpensive. Each one is made to fit the exact well that you are on. Just give a friendly water tech a call to determine which one is right for you. Or read one follow the instructions under items number 7, 16 and 17 on this page: Sizing the Correct Filter

Backwashing Acid Neutralizers

Acid neutralizers normally do not need to be backwashed as often as iron filters. They serve two entirely different purposes. If you should use an acid neutralizer to remove iron, you must backwash it far more often that you would otherwise. As it backwashes it uses even more mineral. So in this regard you are using way more pH increasing minerals than necessary. Of course for the company selling these minerals to you it is additional ongoing income.

A Flow Rate Check is Essential

You should also be sure to do a flow rate check as described on our Articles and FAQ's page under item #7. That is how you know what size you need. It is also helpful to know how many permanent residents are in the home. There are different solutions for different pH values. In some cases you may need two backwashing tanks if the pH is really low. You should contact one of our expert techs once you know what your pH is so they can tell you exactly what you need. Be VERY wary of people who add acid neutralizer minerals in other tanks, such as water softeners and iron filters.
.

Don't Mix Minerals in One Tank

It makes no sense at all in a proper application and raises many different concerns such as minerals shifting in the tank, unstable mineral beds, pH ranges that fluctuate greatly, and often it unnecessarily raises hardness levels in water that is not hard, which then may require the addition of a water softener and drinking water system. DO NOT let companies sell you units with pH increasing minerals such a calcite in the SAME TANK as other filtering or softening minerals. Please don't hesitate to give us a quick call for a quick evaluation of your issue. Keep in mind our technicians are not allowed to ask you to buy anything or pressure you in ANY way. They just answer your questions and give you great advice. We are the online leader for water treatment worldwide.
 
Last edited:

Grande Mastere Dreade

Snag's spellchecker
Thanks for all the advice, I will try the bleach method and let you know. We had another quote from a local water guy who has been dealing with this stuff for years. He recommended an aeriated filter tank with a water softener and said that would fix it, around $5,000. the PH is around 7.2 with iron definitely present and the water in our area is considered hard. SWMBO only drinks Fiji bottled water but would like the shower water to not smell.
get her a shower filter, wife swears by hers and she is highly picky about her shower water..

https://www.multipure.com/products/bath-and-garden/aquashower/

and ph of 7.2... just what you need to brew beer..
 
D

Deleted member 149385

Guest
I would get another opinion on the treatment system for iron. Your PH sounds fine at 7.2. Ours was much lower before neutralizing.
  • Acidic water has a pH lower than 7. Strongly acidic substances can have a pH of 0. Battery acid falls into this category.
  • Alkaline water has a pH of 8 or above. Strongly alkaline substances, such as lye, can have a pH of 14.
  • Pure water has a pH of 7 and is considered “neutral” because it has neither acidic nor basic qualities.
It may in fact cost 5 grand to treat for iron and other minerals, but the water should be very drinkable then. Our deep well water tastes great to drink. OTOH, we just spent a week on Block Island at a house with a shallow well, which is surface water, and the water was safe and potable, but tasted very earthy to me, so we bought bottled water to drink.

Acid Neutralizer Iron Filter​

Acid neutralizer iron filter units where one tank is used are often a marginal approach. The only time that it is a good idea is if you are CERTAIN that you have only red water iron. And no clear water iron. In addition, you may not have enough space to add an iron filter after the acid neutralizer for some reason. The proper approach if you have both iron issues and pH issues, is an act neutralizer followed by an iron filter. You really should not mix the minerals for both into one tank. This is a marginal approach often used by marginal water treatment dealers to create a lifetime of expensive service calls. Have one tank to raise the pH. And then have another tank to remove iron, sulfur, manganese etc. Or use a dual tank system like the one below to save water and be the most efficient when cleaning itself. The unit is fully automatic.

Dual Purpose Tanks

We do sell a twin tank system where one tank is the acid neutralizer and the other is an iron filter. The first tank raises the pH. That allows the second tank to remove iron, sulfur, manganese, rust, dirt, sediment and chemicals. The best iron filter for the second tank is our Popular Terminox® Iron, sulfur and manganese filter. It requires not salt or chemicals or maintenance. So all you ever have to do with this premium filter is add a little mineral to the Acid Neutralizer tank every year or so. How often depends on how low the pH is, how big the tank is and how much water you use. The average for most customers when the tank is properly sized is about once per year. The cost for the replacement minerals usually cost $25 to $35.
acid neutralizer iron filter
These units are very efficient and fairly inexpensive. Each one is made to fit the exact well that you are on. Just give a friendly water tech a call to determine which one is right for you. Or read one follow the instructions under items number 7, 16 and 17 on this page: Sizing the Correct Filter

Backwashing Acid Neutralizers

Acid neutralizers normally do not need to be backwashed as often as iron filters. They serve two entirely different purposes. If you should use an acid neutralizer to remove iron, you must backwash it far more often that you would otherwise. As it backwashes it uses even more mineral. So in this regard you are using way more pH increasing minerals than necessary. Of course for the company selling these minerals to you it is additional ongoing income.

A Flow Rate Check is Essential

You should also be sure to do a flow rate check as described on our Articles and FAQ's page under item #7. That is how you know what size you need. It is also helpful to know how many permanent residents are in the home. There are different solutions for different pH values. In some cases you may need two backwashing tanks if the pH is really low. You should contact one of our expert techs once you know what your pH is so they can tell you exactly what you need. Be VERY wary of people who add acid neutralizer minerals in other tanks, such as water softeners and iron filters.
.

Don't Mix Minerals in One Tank

It makes no sense at all in a proper application and raises many different concerns such as minerals shifting in the tank, unstable mineral beds, pH ranges that fluctuate greatly, and often it unnecessarily raises hardness levels in water that is not hard, which then may require the addition of a water softener and drinking water system. DO NOT let companies sell you units with pH increasing minerals such a calcite in the SAME TANK as other filtering or softening minerals. Please don't hesitate to give us a quick call for a quick evaluation of your issue. Keep in mind our technicians are not allowed to ask you to buy anything or pressure you in ANY way. They just answer your questions and give you great advice. We are the online leader for water treatment worldwide.
^^^^^^ this
 




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