next gen UCM1-3.5 marine generator

167149

Super Anarchist
Stainless exhaust elbow. Heh. Famously poor idea.

Doesn’t a 1 cylinder diesel shake and vibrate something fierce?

For the price one might consider simply using the auxiliary engine — wear it out and replace sooner. Simpler, lighter, smaller, quieter, smoother.

It is truly regrettable that our auxiliary engines don’t have a better way to connect a PTO generator. A flywheel generator would be slick. Or simply a PTO shaft from the transmission.

Probably. It is on rubber mounts. Don't know how big a problem that would be.

I mean, that was kind of what my other thread was about. Powering a generator from an auxiliary. But I think most people seemed to suggest that if I wanted power from the auxiliary I should take it off by way of a high output DC alternator, as you say below.

Some youtuber stuck magnets to his flywheel (on a lister clone or something like that). He wasn't trying to get any substantial power from it. But he lit up a few light-bulbs or something. It would be nice if the marine transmissions had PTO. Like tractors.
wasn't it yanmar that brought out a cassette type generator to do just that, from memory it fitted between the bellhousing and gearbox/ sail drive, that was late 90's from memory
 

167149

Super Anarchist
A stainless exhaust elbow can work well and last a long time, but it's got to be decent wall thickness. Sched 40 or Sched 80 pipe, not 1.6mm flimsy tube.
after trying a few ways to get this done and last I finally built on from heavy wall copper (schedule 40ish) and welded it up with 15% silfoss, as I'd had a lot of success "wash welding" the copper ends of my refrig condensors with 15% i wash welded the entire inside of the tubes and then went ahead and welded it all up 20 years on it hasn't leaked or fallen off.... yet
 

kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
27,648
5,494
Kent Island!
after trying a few ways to get this done and last I finally built on from heavy wall copper (schedule 40ish) and welded it up with 15% silfoss, as I'd had a lot of success "wash welding" the copper ends of my refrig condensors with 15% i wash welded the entire inside of the tubes and then went ahead and welded it all up 20 years on it hasn't leaked or fallen off.... yet
Usually sulfur in diesel exhaust condenses in the moisture to create sulfuric acid and eats right through copper. Maybe the new low sulfur fuel is better?
 

167149

Super Anarchist
Usually sulfur in diesel exhaust condenses in the moisture to create sulfuric acid and eats right through copper. Maybe the new low sulfur fuel is better?
goes through copper yes however the material in contact with the wet exhaust is coated with a 15% silfos weld coating which seems to make quite a difference re handling sulphuric acidic compunds
 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
10,128
6,313
Canada
I would not attach 4 lugs to one stud like that. I think that is unacceptable, actually.
Totally agree that there does not appear to be very much thread engaged on that nut. ABYC does allow up to 4 terminals on a battery connection but that one is for shit.
For us the use is 1) water maker 2) power generation when passaging 3) topping up the batteries when solar doesn't 4) hot water 5) air conditioner.
Interesting. We ran a Spectra 12V watermaker quite happily on passages running on solar panels. (500W) Seldom did we need extra power either. Very very few days we would have to run the engine (like after 4 or 5 days of very solid rain/overcast). It had a stock 55A Yanmar alternator so not very efficient.

For hot water we either used a black jerry jug sort of solar shower or propane on demand heater in colder climates.

But we had a diesel engine, an outboard motor in the other hull of our cat for docking, a dinghy outboard, and a gas powered dive compressor. 4 IC engines seemed like enough for me to keep running!
 

mckenzie.keith

Aspiring Anarchist
847
281
Santa Cruz
Totally agree that there does not appear to be very much thread engaged on that nut. ABYC does allow up to 4 terminals on a battery connection but that one is for shit.
For me it just looks like there is not a large enough angle between some of the lugs. I have heard that ABYC allows up to 4 lugs on a stud. But regardless of the ABYC, common sense says the lugs have to fan out a bit so they can all lay flat. Maybe they are but from the picture it sure looks like they are not.
 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
7,089
1,465
worldwide
Stainless has an active and passive state

without oxygen stainless goes active and rots away

any stainless water handling component must drain dry …no trapped puddle of water that goes anaerobic

exhaust injection jackets are troublemakers

seems the cheap ones last as long as the expensive ones
 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,985
1,279
San Diego
Yes, ABYC allows max of 4 wires on a stud. However, it does look like the nut is not fully engaged with thread. Different makes of crimp fittings stack in different ways, but you must always be careful that the insulation is not interfering with compression
 




Top