Off market 45ish cat for sale?

Zonker

Super Anarchist
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5,194
Canada
- convince your wife that she doesn't need 7 pairs of shoes...

- e-readers / tablets to replace books and paper manuals

- inflatable fenders are shockingly lighter than vinyl ones. Or have a mix for rough docks where the inflatables are not as desirable

 

KC375

Super Anarchist
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Northern Hemisphere
is that seven pairs per season or per month

(my wife's reaction to Imelda Marcos...so much money so few shoes...prior to marriage I thought multisyllabic, expensive and Italian meant things like Maserati Biturbo or Ferrari Testarosa or Riva Aquarama or Riva Tritone...then I learned about Salvatore Ferragamo, Bruno Cucinelli, Dolce & Gabana, Giuseppe Zanotti)

 

jdazey

Member
428
127
Kingston, WA
Back on topic, the other Chris White Voyager 48, Brio, is for sale. That one has a single dagger board instead of keels and a rotating mast.

https://www.yachtworld.com/core/listing/pl_boat_detail.jsp?&units=Feet&id=3674897&lang=en&slim=broker&&hosturl=cwdesigns&&ywo=cwdesigns&

We have the first one and find it quite satisfactory despite the keels.

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
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Canada
Man, if I was going to spend the money on a custom 48' cat, I'd spring the extra 10K or so for a foam core instead of wood.

 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,637
3,230
Western Red Cedar in a strip planked configuration for a multihull with proper in and out sheathing in the composite of your choice is going to give great and long lived service at a high strength/weight and weight/stiffness categories. And at a lower cost per sq ft if you know what you are doing. A bit of judicious carbon applied in carefully considered high stress areas will create an amazing craft!

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
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Canada
I know it's a good core for strip planked construction. Certainly cheaper. But these days, I'd use Ian Farrier "wide thermoformed foam" method for a one off. The resale alone would be so much better as evidenced by the relatively low cost of all these boats with wood core.

 

boardhead

Anarchist
Getting off mrybas subject but there ain't much going on elsewhere -

I built an Airex foam cored, unidirectional/CSM  glass skinned, polyester resin, Kelsall trimaran in 1978. Despite the best efforts of three derelict owners totally neglecting and abusing the boat after the second owner and I had enjoyed twenty years of outstanding structural performance the boat is STILL a candidate for a thorough refinish/refit - these materials of construction are absolutely awesome. Check out the Triple Jack story.

My second build was Divinycell cored, all unidirectional glass skinned, Vinyl Ester resin, my design trimaran in 1991, that boat has been properly maintained, is like new and structurally flawless. Materials that were not available first time around yielded a better weight/stiffness/strength result but in my opinion no long term durability improvement. Divinycell had a broader available density range, I used 3, 5, 6 and 10 pound density, weights wood can't match at the required shear and compression loads.

I bought an Airex cored, crappy woven roving/CSM glass (the spec suggested non crimp bi-axial), polyester resin 1991 built St Francis 44 in 1997 which I still own. This build is also structurally flawless and those materials of construction were of significant importance in my choice of a production built cruising cat.

My first boat was a strip planked western red cedar, CSM glass/polyester resin sheathed monohull. I bought her as a ten year old rebuild project which contributed enormously to my subsequent construction material choices. That boat served me well but the structure was never challenged with the weight/strength requirements of a multihull.

 

jdazey

Member
428
127
Kingston, WA
Western Red Cedar in a strip planked configuration for a multihull with proper in and out sheathing in the composite of your choice is going to give great and long lived service at a high strength/weight and weight/stiffness categories. And at a lower cost per sq ft if you know what you are doing. A bit of judicious carbon applied in carefully considered high stress areas will create an amazing craft!
Presto was built by Lone Star Multihulls. I believe Brio was built by Lombardi.

Presto under construction

hull_construction.jpg

 

jdazey

Member
428
127
Kingston, WA
Don't know. I thought, without justification, that they were uni reinforcing strips. Presto was launched in 1995, and Lone Star Multihulls is long gone. Chris might know. I'll try to remember to ask.

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
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Canada
Usually cloth is 50" wide with some at 38". I could believe those were 38" overlaps.

If they were uni there just isn't enough there to justify I think.

 

MichalD

Member
60
10
Toronto
@Zonker is there an advantage for wood strip planking in that it's not isotropic? Ie. Does the grain running parallel to the hull make for a stiffer hull which bends less over time and thus becomes less tired? I dont know - just ideas that i hope others can validate.

Brio looks like it has a foam deck which I would imagine addresses most of the problems with hardware through hulls, etc. Is your hesitation purely on resale value or do you think there's more chance if rot etc in a cedar core hull?

 
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