Off market 45ish cat for sale?

Zonker

Super Anarchist
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Global bending is rarely an issue especially with cats. The whole platform flexes anyway.

Even people that talk about monohulls getting too soft - it's rarely a real concern except to hard core racers maybe anecdotally. 

I would be more concerned with rot in any wood core - balsa, cedar, or (shudder) plywood. This perception does affect resale value. I would really hesitate to buy a hull that is cored with anything but foam. My personal predjudice I guess. But I've dealt with too much rotten plywood in decks and as hatch cover lining etc etc. or delammed balsa.

 

Zonker

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Notice the timestamp in lots of the photos is 2018.... get some current photos from the broker before making a trip to view!

 

NedZepplin

New member
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SE USA
I would be more concerned with rot in any wood core - balsa, cedar, or (shudder) plywood. This perception does affect resale value. I would really hesitate to buy a hull that is cored with anything but foam. My personal predjudice I guess. But I've dealt with too much rotten plywood in decks and as hatch cover lining etc etc. or delammed balsa.
Does "end grain balsa" resolve the issue?  EG: the fibers are perpendicular to the surface so water should not be able to travel very far.    It seems new boats built by Beneteau brands and some south african yards (I think?) are using end grain balsa.  I even saw one article expositing its virtues against foam.  But my general assumption is that if a material is renewable its only used because it's cheaper than a petrochemical derived one. 

How about "cold molding"?  I saw it described as "the wood is saturated with resin", but not sure if that use of the word "saturated" means "permeated completely" or just "completely covered".

The Dix Harvey 550 looks like a really nice design but was built using cold molding. (at least the examples I've seen.)  I saw one broker go into the forepeak locker with a camera to show us "the finest in old world boat craftsmanship".  I find that statement horrifying, but I don't want to be prejudiced against a good build method. 

 
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MichalD

Member
60
10
Toronto
What’s the headroom, doesn’t say anywhere?

it’s not far from where there is a Mumby too I think, perhaps a fun trip to “Peely-peely” is in 
The saloon headroom is 192cm, which actually isn't bad but is just short of the 195 that I need to stand up straight. 

The broker was very friendly and got some video for me (sorry for the thread drift). Looked roughly like the pics minus rust on some of the stainless and blisters in the locker (said to be paint only but definitely worth a closer look). 

 

Sand crab

Member
307
1
Montana
How about "cold molding"?  I saw it described as "the wood is saturated with resin", but not sure if that use of the word "saturated" means "permeated completely" or just "completely covered".
My Crowther tri was cold molded with West epoxy. I got a real nasty gash to the core from a windstorm while at the dock. 5 months later I hauled it out and the wetness had barely expanded and this was in one of the wettest winters in the PNW. It was double diagonal planked with cedar. I don't now if it was saturated to the core. but it sure made the patch job easier.

 

Son of a Sailor

Super Anarchist
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Huntington, NY
Just an observation . . . the trimaran moored in front of Talisker in those photos appears to be Hydroptere no??

Schionning-50-1-18.jpg


 
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Zonker

Super Anarchist
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5,048
Canada
Does "end grain balsa" resolve the issue?  EG: the fibers are perpendicular to the surface so water should not be able to travel very far.    It seems new boats built by Beneteau brands and some south african yards (I think?) are using end grain balsa.  I even saw one article expositing its virtues against foam.  But my general assumption is that if a material is renewable its only used because it's cheaper than a petrochemical derived one. 
End grain balsa is SUPPOSED to prevent water wicking. It just slows the progress down. I've seen a lot of J-Boats with balsa core with big patches opened up with wet core. 

Balsa core has better shear strength - but typical boatbuilding 80 kg/m3 foam cores are strong enough that the extra strength is not required.

Balsa is used because it is cheaper, not because it is better.

How about "cold molding"?  I saw it described as "the wood is saturated with resin", but not sure if that use of the word "saturated" means "permeated completely" or just "completely covered".
The wood is NOT saturated with resin. It goes in about 1mm. It is coated with resin and this stabilizes the moisture content, low enough to prevent rot.

My Crowther tri was cold molded with West epoxy. I got a real nasty gash to the core from a windstorm while at the dock. 5 months later I hauled it out and the wetness had barely expanded and this was in one of the wettest winters in the PNW. It was double diagonal planked with cedar. I don't now if it was saturated to the core. but it sure made the patch job easier.
Was the gash above the waterline? Even in a rainy PNW winter, there are days that are dry and that allows partial drying.

 
This crowther 42 has some cool features eg. "Frangible" foam in last foot of the dagger board (ie. The last foot is sacrificial), kick up rudders, retractable out boards, etc.

I would be tempted if it had an inch more headroom (don't shoot =p) 

https://yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sail-catamarans/crowther-42/220967
Wow, that looks like a very good buy, plenty of good quality relatively new gear all on a good looking boat. What’s the catch? and why hasn’t it sold in 3 years?

 

Tomfl

Member
And why oh why do we keep putting heavy old fashioned instruments on the wall of light cats. A digital recording barometer is far more useful. And a $5 stick on LCD clock can light up at night. Both are far more functional. Got to be the best $/lb weight savings possible.

View attachment 435409
My reason is they were a gift from my Dad that was on the name sake of my boat Blythe Spirit.  My Dad's 38 ft Abaco gaff rigged schooner built in Marsh Harbor in 1954 was named Blythe Spirit and the took the clock and barometer off and put them on the wall of his house when he was living on dirt.

My Seawind does have a composting head which weighs less than a porcelain throne many old fashioned boats have; not to mention the weight of 20+ gallons of water and a tank to hold it.  While the through hulls and plumbing may not weigh a whole lot getting rid of through hulls is always a big OK in my book.  Add in the weight and cost reduction of using outboards instead of inboards with shafts, struts, and props, along with those always problematic through hulls and I am reducing weight even more.  Did I mention I am also saving weight by eliminating through hulls and zincs; not to mention reducing costs to maintain the boat.

As an extra added attraction the clock rings eight bells to signal watch changes.

 

mrybas

Member
180
59
They have a Dolphin 43 under contract.  
The boat was surveyed today, but seems to be moisture issues according to the surveyor.  I thought that was strange for a divyincell core boat.  I don’t have all the details though.

 

NedZepplin

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SE USA
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