Off season storage

sheethead

Member
362
2
Branford CT
If I'm keeping the boat dry with a dehumidifier while on the hard for the winter, why can't I keep the sails on the boat? I always pull them off and store them at home but I don't know why?

 

BGeff

Super Anarchist
3,490
255
Ann Arbor, MI
Just go ahead and do it.  It's certainly less of a hassle.  But I do think the air in a home or garage or sailmaker's loft is more stable than that on the boat with all the daily weather fluctuations, even if there is a dehumidifier.

 

Monkey

Super Anarchist
10,899
2,523
For now I’m just doing the normal thing and have the main, J1, J3, 2 A2’s, and an A3 in my living room. I’m not sure where the other twelve sails will go though. Lol!  Obviously I’m not married. 

674F64C6-C20F-4BCD-BABD-1E6151E4F0CC.jpeg

 

12 metre

Super Anarchist
3,948
741
English Bay
IMO you are going to have a hard time keeping the dehumidifier working on the hard in a cold CT winter.

The problem with dehumidifiers in colder northern winters is the cooling coils tend to ice up when operating below about 60F, which can ruin the unit.

So then you need an onboard heater.  The combined amperage draw can potentially blow the breaker.

The combination works okay if the boat is in the water for the winter as typically occurs in PNW.

But on the hard it is a different story. 

For some reason, and I have never understood why and no one has given me a good explanation for why - boats on the hard get much colder inside than on the water.

For example, when my old boat was in the water for the winter the inside was at a "balmy" 65F with the electric heater on even on freezing days.

But on the hard with the 1500W heater on full it would only measure 40F at best when it was freezing (barely) outside.

 
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jerseyguy

Super Anarchist
IMO you are going to have a hard time keeping the dehumidifier working on the hard in a cold CT winter.

The problem with dehumidifiers in colder northern winters is the cooling coils tend to ice up when operating below about 60F, which can ruin the unit.

So then you need an onboard heater.  The combined amperage draw can potentially blow the breaker.

The combination works okay if the boat is in the water for the winter as typically occurs in PNW.

But on the hard it is a different story. 

For some reason, and I have never understood why and no one has given me a good explanation for why - boats on the hard get much colder inside than on the water.

For example, when my old boat was in the water for the winter the inside was at a "balmy" 65F with the electric heater on even on freezing days.

But on the hard with the 1500W heater on full it would only measure 40F at best when it was freezing (barely) outside.
Not a physicist, didn’t play one on TV, didn’t stay at a Holiday Inn Express.

My best guess is that the water retains more heat than the air and thus acts as a bit of a thermal insulator keeping the interior warmer than if the boat was on the hard.  Perhaps some minimum effect of all that surface area underwater not being exposed to air, wind, etc.  My best guess, YMMV.

 

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
12,928
2,597
For some reason, and I have never understood why and no one has given me a good explanation for why - boats on the hard get much colder inside than on the water.

For example, when my old boat was in the water for the winter the inside was at a "balmy" 65F with the electric heater on even on freezing days.

But on the hard with the 1500W heater on full it would only measure 40F at best when it was freezing (barely) outside.
That's easy. Because the water is warmer than the air.

I agree abou the dehumidifier problem.

 
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12 metre

Super Anarchist
3,948
741
English Bay
That's easy. Because the water is warmer than the air.
Too easy. 

The water is near freezing - only a few degrees different at most.  I would have thought that air being a better insulator than water that water would more readily absorb the heat generated by the heater.

 

Foredeck Shuffle

More of a Stoic Cynic, Anarchy Sounds Exhausting
Too easy. 

The water is near freezing - only a few degrees different at most.  I would have thought that air being a better insulator than water that water would more readily absorb the heat generated by the heater.
Thermal range is slower with a large body of water.  A front can move through and change air temperature 50 degree Fahrenheit, in that same day a large body of water will likely drop less than a single degree.  Thus the thermal range a boat in the water will experience will be much lower than on land.  Think about the average day with no thermal front, just from the sun coming up and going down you can expect a range of 10-30 degrees Fahrenheit in a single day while water temperatures will change by no more than .5 degree.

Yes the water can drop to freezing but doing so will take time with very little thermal range.  Though the same cannot be said for the part of the boat that is above the water, on low wind days the air temperature will be changed by the water temperature, further leveling out what the boat experiences.

High thermal cycling induces a range of issues in different materials and humidity adds to the potential chemistry of problems that can occur with those materials.

 

JohnMB

Super Anarchist
2,840
611
Evanston
Too easy. 

The water is near freezing - only a few degrees different at most.  I would have thought that air being a better insulator than water that water would more readily absorb the heat generated by the heater.
Heat conduction to the water will definitely be better than to air.

Which is why it is most likely that the answer to you question is that the water temperature is higher then the air temperature (at least on an 24hr average basis) As FS notes the air temperature will fluctuate much faster than the water temp.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,796
12,416
Great Wet North
For some reason, and I have never understood why and no one has given me a good explanation for why - boats on the hard get much colder inside than on the water.
Same reason that coastal areas like ours have warmer and more stable weather temps than inland areas.

The ocean acts as a giant heat sink so its temperature doesn't fluctuate as much or as quickly as the air and the land.

The fluctuation in water temp around here is only a couple of degrees year round - you'll die of hypothermia as quickly in the summer as the winter. :D

Having the bottom of your boat sitting in that stable temp is what causes the phenomenon you describe.

You should also have noticed how the temp inside your boat remains much cooler in the summer compared to when it is on the hard.

 




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