Offshore harnesses / PFDs, yet again

Murphness

Super Anarchist
1,151
76
Boston
Spinlock w/ a glowfast tether
Are those glow fast tethers good? I looked at them when they were first out, but never got around to replacing my old stormy seas
Yup. Love mine. The easier it is to use the more I use it. The other added benefit is that you can quickly pick out your PFD when they're all bunched up in a hanging locker or line b/c of the glow or different appearance in day light.

Fortunately haven't had to pull the release on it yet, but I've tried it loaded up as a test and it works great. Far easier than a snap shackle and you never have to worry about it not being closed or a spring failing on the shackle pin.

 

jack_sparrow

Super Anarchist
37,393
5,094
I see tethers with luggage-tag / cows-hitch style harness/PFD connections which are both ISAF OSR and ISO 12401 approved are now being heavily marketed by some manufactures.

Not too sure of the genisus to that as once snap shackle and other designs that could be released under load were finally ISAF OSR approved they then quickly became the product of choice. Maybe because they don't enjoy an ISO 12401 tick manufacurers were getting some customer pushback and felt compelled to provide a choice.

Can think of many instances where I would prefer a snap shackle/clip that can be released under load instead of having to fuck around cutting myself free of a luggage-tagged / cow-hitched tether.

 
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Whinging Pom

Super Anarchist
I rig my boat with 7 tethers so SWMBO and I never have to unclip. Some of these tethers have seen a fair amount of UV over the years and I'd like to replace them. The clips, all made by Gibb are fine, it's just the webbing I doubt. As an ex-sailmaker I have confidence in my sewing ability, I just need the ISO standard; Has any Anarchist got a copy? To buy it would cost almost as much as replacing the tethers with ready made ones from the Swindlery.

 

oreana

Member
180
0
Boise
I rig my boat with 7 tethers so SWMBO and I never have to unclip. Some of these tethers have seen a fair amount of UV over the years and I'd like to replace them. The clips, all made by Gibb are fine, it's just the webbing I doubt. As an ex-sailmaker I have confidence in my sewing ability, I just need the ISO standard; Has any Anarchist got a copy? To buy it would cost almost as much as replacing the tethers with ready made ones from the Swindlery.
One of the better ideas for tethers and jacklines i have seen (and especially for those who sew their own) uses nylon tubing type webbing with a dyneema core line inside the tubing protected from the sun. Any "eye" created by sewing webbing is basically a bight- knotwise. A pattern sewing machine, such as a box stitch type machine, is often the MINIMUM stitching required in a factory enviornment to secure a webbing bight. A competent operator with a sewing machine that can penetrate multiple layers of webbing can do a better job of securing the webbing bight, than a box stitch machine's single pass does. Proved this to my satisfaction by testing sewn samples at a local rigging supply dealer with a calibrated hydraulic tester. The downside of extra passes of sewn seams is that that area becomes stiffer.

 

Murphness

Super Anarchist
1,151
76
Boston
I see tethers with luggage-tag / cows-hitch style harness/PFD connections which are both ISAF OSR and ISO 12401 approved are now being heavily marketed by some manufactures.

Not too sure of the genisus to that as once snap shackle and other designs that could be released under load were finally ISAF OSR approved they then quickly became the product of choice. Maybe because they don't enjoy an ISO 12401 tick manufacurers were getting some customer pushback and felt compelled to provide a choice.

Can think of many instances where I would prefer a snap shackle/clip that can be released under load instead of having to fuck around cutting myself free of a luggage-tagged / cow-hitched tether.
Glowfast are luggage tagged but have a quick release system they invented. It's really well thought out. Can be released under full load quite easily with no effort at all. No fumbling for a tiny lanyard either.

Edit: one of the things that stuck out to me after the TransAt this season was that the rest of the crew kept opening their snap shackle quick releases by mistake and not knowing. This is virtually impossible with a glowfast. Also, sometimes the pin wouldn't engage with the shackle completely and could pull open under load.

 
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jack_sparrow

Super Anarchist
37,393
5,094
Thanks Murph...good to see people are out there improving the boring stuff, not just the go fast goodies. The issues you list with snap shackles is exactly why they couldn't get an ISO tick and why it took so long getting an ISAF OSR thumbs up. That new idea will sell themselves.

PS. Just realised it is same Australian Glowfast company that make those wonderfull glow in the dark clutch labels.

 
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Suijin

Member
Veering slightly off topic on a tether rant, does anyone besides me detest the clip on the end of the Wichard tethers? Getting this thing off a web strap with one hand can frequently require a confounding amount of unnecessary focus due to the hook that the wire gate mates with:

wichard.png


I much prefer this style which has a smooth gate mouth that just slips off when the gate is open:

432375.jpg


 

Snore

Super Anarchist
3,183
397
DTSP and on OPB
Sujin

Spot on! Only place I have seen Wilchard double action clips is on their tethers. They suck!

The other design is often seen on confined space and other work harnesses. They probably have a shorter service life, but are much easier to use with one hand.

 

MoeAlfa

Super Anarchist
12,560
35
I don't like the Wichard clip and have enough trouble with the other one (Kong?), especially at O-God why am I doing this-thirty seven hrs with a scop patch behind each ear. It too has a hook, but not as pronounced as the Wichard. Being aluminum, it is also much lighter, which is good.

 
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ni·hil·ism

SatoriSails
306
0
California
I went with a via ferrata tether instead. The length is great with taught jacklines, and I appreciate the screamer attached just in case there is ever a time when whatever I'm clipped into is a static anchor. The Spinlock chest harness makes sense more than anything else I've seen. When I'm single handing I omit the inflatable and go with a Black Diamond chest harness, then wear a climbing harness when I start worrying about falling overboard.

 

ctutmark

Super Anarchist
1,739
279
PNW
I went with a via ferrata tether instead. The length is great with taught jacklines, and I appreciate the screamer attached just in case there is ever a time when whatever I'm clipped into is a static anchor. The Spinlock chest harness makes sense more than anything else I've seen. When I'm single handing I omit the inflatable and go with a Black Diamond chest harness, then wear a climbing harness when I start worrying about falling overboard.
Is the climbing harness used in conjunction with the chest harness?

 

ni·hil·ism

SatoriSails
306
0
California
I went with a via ferrata tether instead. The length is great with taught jacklines, and I appreciate the screamer attached just in case there is ever a time when whatever I'm clipped into is a static anchor. The Spinlock chest harness makes sense more than anything else I've seen. When I'm single handing I omit the inflatable and go with a Black Diamond chest harness, then wear a climbing harness when I start worrying about falling overboard.
Is the climbing harness used in conjunction with the chest harness?
Yeah the climbing harness is worn in addition to the chest harness and the tether is attached to both. Fall protection is nothing new to me, after having spent most of my life rock climbing. The only difference is that the rock you're climbing is bucking like a ten ton toro. I suggest getting something with leg loops that unbuckle and drop so you can go potty easily without having to step out of the harness. The Black Diamond alpine bod harness is great for this. No padding, but no big deal if you're not hanging from it for long periods.

 
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Suijin

Member
I went with a via ferrata tether instead. The length is great with taught jacklines, and I appreciate the screamer attached just in case there is ever a time when whatever I'm clipped into is a static anchor. The Spinlock chest harness makes sense more than anything else I've seen. When I'm single handing I omit the inflatable and go with a Black Diamond chest harness, then wear a climbing harness when I start worrying about falling overboard.
Hmmmm. How long are the two tethers? I really like having a 3' and a 6'. I use the 3' except when I have to use the 6', depending on conditions.

I also like the snap shackle quick release and not just for safety. When you're sailing offshore the quick release is a real convenience as your harness is off and on with mind-numbing regularity. I suppose I could hack up the Ferrata with one.

 
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ni·hil·ism

SatoriSails
306
0
California
Just measured the extended length and they are just over three feet. So far I haven't found any place on the boat where I would want my tether longer, but I think this is where preferences will differ from one sailor to the next. I prefer to girth hitch the tether to the chest harness loops but I could see where you might want to leave the harness on and just clip to your tether. Not really my choice. I keep the harness clipped to the jack lines keep the tether girth hitched to the harness. Put it on when I want to go forward, and take it off when I'm back in the cockpit.

 

ctutmark

Super Anarchist
1,739
279
PNW
I went with a via ferrata tether instead. The length is great with taught jacklines, and I appreciate the screamer attached just in case there is ever a time when whatever I'm clipped into is a static anchor. The Spinlock chest harness makes sense more than anything else I've seen. When I'm single handing I omit the inflatable and go with a Black Diamond chest harness, then wear a climbing harness when I start worrying about falling overboard.
Is the climbing harness used in conjunction with the chest harness?
Yeah the climbing harness is worn in addition to the chest harness and the tether is attached to both. Fall protection is nothing new to me, after having spent most of my life rock climbing. The only difference is that the rock you're climbing is bucking like a ten ton toro. I suggest getting something with leg loops that unbuckle and drop so you can go potty easily without having to step out of the harness. The Black Diamond alpine bod harness is great for this. No padding, but no big deal if you're not hanging from it for long periods.
Thanks for the advice on fall setups, unless one is going up a mast the fall velocity is a lesser concern that the orientation of being pulled along the boat. I am trying to picture how you are going to look once you are in the water getting towed by this setup or even hanging alongside the boat incapacitated. Since you say in another post that you hitch your tether onto the harness and then attach it to the climbing harness possibly with a carabineer around the tether? I am hoping to make sense of this setup as it is atypical from common practice and doesn't sync with what is taught in any safety class I have seen. Also you mention that you "Put it on when I want to go forward, and take it off when I'm back in the cockpit" which sends the message that you feel very secure in the cockpit which again is something the various racing rules say not to do, in fact they make a very clear point of wanting people to be harnessed and tethered whenever they are on deck.

 

ni·hil·ism

SatoriSails
306
0
California
Thanks for the advice on fall setups, unless one is going up a mast the fall velocity is a lesser concern that the orientation of being pulled along the boat. I am trying to picture how you are going to look once you are in the water getting towed by this setup or even hanging alongside the boat incapacitated. Since you say in another post that you hitch your tether onto the harness and then attach it to the climbing harness possibly with a carabineer around the tether? I am hoping to make sense of this setup as it is atypical from common practice and doesn't sync with what is taught in any safety class I have seen. Also you mention that you "Put it on when I want to go forward, and take it off when I'm back in the cockpit" which sends the message that you feel very secure in the cockpit which again is something the various racing rules say not to do, in fact they make a very clear point of wanting people to be harnessed and tethered whenever they are on deck.

I'm trying to figure out how I would fall overboard with a three foot tether. I suppose if I clipped to the lifelines on the leeward side, that would do it but that's about it. The jack lines could stretch enough to where I was over the side, but only if I clip to the leeward side. I try to stay on the windward side when I'm on the foredeck as much as possible to avoid these possibilities. Also, when I'm wearing a climbing harness I usually girth hitch to both of them with the tether. No carabiner on the harnesses. Also I am not a racer, and this is all for single handing. Around here (Salish Sea) we have people falling overboard often enough for me to believe that jack lines are not part of the safety protocol, but MOB drills are common.

 
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jfdubu

Member
This is a bit off topic but what about the inflatable vs non-inflatable argument. I'm upgrading my own pfd (current non) and wrestling with which way to go. I much prefer the cost, ease of use, pockets, maintenance of a non but the comfort of an inflatable have my attention. Everything I find keeps telling me once your in the water the non inflatable has far more advantages. Non inflatables,, who wears what models?

 

Presuming Ed

Super Anarchist
11,065
234
London, UK
For what use? I'm happy umpiring on a pond/reservoir using a 50N buoyancy aid, but wouldn't wear one at sea. That's assuming I'm wearing oilskins of some description. 150N inflatable on the sea.

Dinghy sailing, with rescue covet, the added mobility of a 50N BA is essential. Worn with wet or dry suit.

I would'nt bother with 100N foam life jackets. Too bulky and restrictive for anything other than being a passenger.

 
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