Olson 40 For Single Handed Blue Water Sailing

The 'fridge is actually pretty good. Can make ice if the weather is cooler than about 80. When its hotter than that the freezer compartment keeps beer just this side of frozen. Can easily keep a week's worth of food for 4 people cold. Most fun cruising is coastal, so that doesn't bother me.

On the very, very rare occasions that we might go further, like to Hawaii, we will take an additional cooler: got a perfect place for it where the nav table used to be.

Autopilot uses an Octopus 1673, and its been demonstrated to be able to steer the boat under spinnaker past Pt Conception on the Coastal Cup, and that was with the old, original rudder.

 

Boom Mover

New member
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Toledo
I am envious of you with your Olson. I raced on "Screaming O " in Lake Erie and in the Port Huron - Macs when Jim Crawford owned her and miss it very much. It was fun being the 13the boat to finish and getting a shore dock! We popped 18 kts quite often. We had 9 crew, I think, with no problems for weight. 
  The rudder seems more of a trim tab for steering when everything is all up. She balances out with sail trim very well. I was main sheet trimmer. I'd like to hear how things develop for you. Some people questioned the room for surfboards? LOL put them in ONE of the rear quarter berths with NO problem. I was amazed at how much room is in the boat BUT there aren't a lot of hidey holes. Everything is clean.
  The runners could be a bit of fun, I would think, single handed. We usually brought them forward to the shrouds during buoy races short handed. We did 7.5 mile triangles in 42 minutes to just under an hour every race. Fast. 
  She was made to be in the Pacific. I hope to see your ideas of the Olsen sailing her single handed . Good luck!

 

El Borracho

Verified User
6,833
2,790
Pacific Rim
Cal 40  ????
Yes, Cals are great old boats. But one sail on a slightly younger ULDB and you'll never go back. I wanted a SC 40, but they are rare (only 7?). So settled for a 50.

The beamy Cal 40's are a rolly MF'ers for cruisers. Been there. These Santa Cruz era boats, long and narrow, don't roll. But the pounding to weather can be unnerving. Luckily cruisers may not need to sail much in pounding conditions.

Perfect for singlehanding because the light loads.

 

socalrider

Super Anarchist
1,423
787
San Diego CA
Is there a list of ULDBs in the 40-50’ size range somewhere?  I always see the Olson 40 and SC - are there others of comparable vintage and price range worthy of a look?

 

El Borracho

Verified User
6,833
2,790
Pacific Rim
Ya, too bad yachtworld does not have search for length/displacement....maybe sailboatdata.com? Look for 80s 90s boats with bad IOR ratings and Transpac wins.

 
Pulled the diesel, installing an electric motor with LiFePO4 battery bank. Saved 700 lbs!

Removed all the smelly stuff. Absolutely no odors below now.

Took a month to remove everything from the diesel, a few hours to install the electric motor.

IMG_4740.jpg

 

Alex W

Super Anarchist
3,346
322
Seattle, WA
How many kWh is your battery bank?  What is your expected range at 6 knots?

I want to do this one day, but don't want to add weight to the boat.  Our Yanmar 3GM isn’t close to that weight. 

 
Batteries: https://battlebornbatteries.com/shop/100ah-12v-gc2-lifepo4-deep-cycle-battery/

100ah x 48v so about 5KWh. They are light (31 lbs each) and I have a lot of room now where the exhaust and fuel tank used to be, so it will be easy to greatly increase bank size as battery prices continue to decline.

I put four of these in to replace 4 T105s. The new 4 are in series to make 48v, the old T105 bank was 2x6v in parallel for a 12v bank. 225Ah x 2 so again about 5KWh. However, drawing high current out of T105s reduces the effective available power enormously, with experiments showing as little as 500Wh when drawing at a 5KWh rate (10 minutes to flat batteries). So the Trojans had to go, they just would not work.

For 12v house loads, I use a 48v to 12v "buck" converter.

https://www.amazon.com/360W-Converter-Voltage-Regulator-Waterproof/dp/B07J274LZD/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1547148391&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=48v+to+12v+30a+buck+converter&psc=1

 
I have such a bad case of the flu that I have not been able to do a sea trial yet. I'll post performance soon, but with the forecast of rain this weekend, might be another week or three. It's a pain working on the boat in the rain, as I have no dodger yet. It hardly rains in Southern California, except this time of the year.

 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
63,113
5,842
De Nile
Batteries: https://battlebornbatteries.com/shop/100ah-12v-gc2-lifepo4-deep-cycle-battery/

100ah x 48v so about 5KWh. They are light (31 lbs each) and I have a lot of room now where the exhaust and fuel tank used to be, so it will be easy to greatly increase bank size as battery prices continue to decline.

I put four of these in to replace 4 T105s. The new 4 are in series to make 48v, the old T105 bank was 2x6v in parallel for a 12v bank. 225Ah x 2 so again about 5KWh. However, drawing high current out of T105s reduces the effective available power enormously, with experiments showing as little as 500Wh when drawing at a 5KWh rate (10 minutes to flat batteries). So the Trojans had to go, they just would not work.

For 12v house loads, I use a 48v to 12v "buck" converter.

https://www.amazon.com/360W-Converter-Voltage-Regulator-Waterproof/dp/B07J274LZD/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1547148391&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=48v+to+12v+30a+buck+converter&psc=1
well, aren't those the bees knees....

 

silent bob

Super Anarchist
8,920
1,430
New Jersey
I have such a bad case of the flu that I have not been able to do a sea trial yet. I'll post performance soon, but with the forecast of rain this weekend, might be another week or three. It's a pain working on the boat in the rain, as I have no dodger yet. It hardly rains in Southern California, except this time of the year.
Got a 20 mile extension cord to reach from San Pedro to Avalon?

 

Foolish

Super Anarchist
1,733
408
Victoria, BC
Remember that light displacement boats, like the O40 or the O30, are designed to have a lot of weight on the rail.  If you don't then you will face a huge amount of leeway drift whenever you are beating into the wind - and I do mean HUGE.  You won't notice this when you are sailing alone, but whenever you are in a fleet you will see the other boats sailing much higher than you.  This just means that you will spend 10% - 20% more time to reach any upwind destination. 

So, contrary to what the others have said, you can buy this boat if you are ok with shifting all of the interior weight with each tack.  (In the open ocean you don't tack very often so it is not a problem and gives you something to do anyway.)  I'm not so extreme to say you have to shift every coffee mug, but certainly anything that weighs more than 50 pounds should be shifted before you perform the next tack.  You would want to build in supports to hold everything on each side of the boat.

On the other hand, if I had that money and a desire for an ocean worthy singlehanded boat, there is no doubt that I would buy one of the many Figaro 2's that are about to hit the market at a very reduced price.  These are fantastic, ocean proven boats specifically built for singlehanding.  I really want one.

 

frostbit

Anarchist
Sailing an O-40 upwind, short-handed, in anything over like 8 knots true will be uncomfortable, slow, wet, and tippy. Even with 8 linebackers on the rail, it will be uncomfortable and wet.

Horses for course, Robert.
O40 is an awesome reacher. Not great on the wind even with a full crew. Particularly in a nasty sea. Love the boat. 

 




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