On-deck fabric spinnaker chute

Found this low-cost way to make a spinnaker tube without cutting up my foredeck...

http://us.laser2sailing.org/gallery/Spinnaker-sock/

Only thing is, the fabric which the guy used, is pretty expensive - likely to be about £40 for sufficient, in the UK in 2017.

I'm thinking I could probably cut up a really worn, tired old genoa I have lying about, and use that instead.

Obviously a chute made of dacron won't shed water like netting would, but I don't plan using the spinn in hard weather.

Any obvious reason not to use an old sail for this purpose? Thanks.

0.jpg


 

silent bob

Super Anarchist
8,714
1,286
New Jersey
Sail cloth won't hold up if you leave it exposed to the sunlight when you're not sailing. Headsail cloth won't let moisture escape. Mesh will let the moisture escape, and will have less surface area contact and less friction.

 

Gouvernail

Lottsa people don’t know I’m famous
38,012
5,547
Austin Texas
45 years ago I designed a "slooper tube" for my Sidewinder deck. It performed at least as well as the through deck tube on my fiberglass Fireball. (My wood Fireball has a cockpit launch system which was much better than the deck launching methods)

Anyway

I used a 15 cm diameter x 20 long pipe for the front end. I wrapped some foam pipe insulation around the leading edge and then sewed a "foredeck long" tapered tube to the PVC.

I put the PVC outside the tube and folded some around the tube onntge outside

I drilled holes in the pvc and ran line around the bow handle

The back of md of the tube was made the same way with 10cm pipe.

Thevtube eas tiedcto the deck such that it was always tightly stretched. This kept the liner from bunching up and creating friction.

The spinnaker pulled past the end of the tube but that was handy. We wadded up the extra and stuffed it in the smaller pipe. That locked the chute in place until launch time.

 
I designed a "slooper tube" for my Sidewinder deck...sewed a "foredeck long" tapered tube to the PVC.

I put the PVC outside the tube and folded some around the tube on the outside

I drilled holes in the pvc and ran line around the bow handle

The back of md of the tube was made the same way with 10cm pipe.
Thanks Gouvernail, that sounds like what I have in mind...

...but critically, what was the 'tube' made of? That's my question - not the PVC entry/aft end openings, but the actual tube itself.

 

Rainbow Spirit

Anarchist
948
117
Sydney, Aus
I would make sure that if you use mesh it is soft and smooth, and not like shade cloth which can be very rough, and may damage the spinnaker. If you use the old genoa cut some holes in the bottom, say about 25mm in diameter.

 

Dex Sawash

Demi Anarchrist
2,575
801
NC USA
Sailcloth works fine below decks, usually arranged to drain to cockpit.

Could add a few grommets on the bottom of yours to be sure it doesn't puddle. Trampoline cloth was pretty cheap last time I bought some, could probably knick a donor tramp off an abandoned Hobie somewhere.

 

Gouvernail

Lottsa people don’t know I’m famous
38,012
5,547
Austin Texas
I designed a "slooper tube" for my Sidewinder deck...sewed a "foredeck long" tapered tube to the PVC.

I put the PVC outside the tube and folded some around the tube on the outside

I drilled holes in the pvc and ran line around the bow handle

The back of md of the tube was made the same way with 10cm pipe.
Thanks Gouvernail, that sounds like what I have in mind...

...but critically, what was the 'tube' made of? That's my question - not the PVC entry/aft end openings, but the actual tube itself.
Some kind of crappy colored sailcloth. My guess is some 3.2 oz like old Laser sails. The loft where I got it used the cloth to make bags . It has been a very long time but I THINK I had them sew the tapered tube about fifty cm longer than tge planned finished tube. The tube was fat enough to go over the 15 cm pvc at one end and the 10 cm pvc at the other end.

Summary... you predrill the pvc in an appropriate place for your tie off lines, run the cloth tube through the pvc, fold it over the outside , hand sew it to the sleeve at the inboard end, burn holes through the cloth to expose the tie off holes, and tie it on your deck.

Maybe I can find a photo. Film and developing used to be expensive and back then all my money went to food and sailing

Edit: I probably made ten tubes between 1972 and 1978. I liked to sell my fully tweaked boats to build the fleet and get a new one for myself as often as I could. My father also sold his boats and I silent winters setting up new toys for the spring. at some point I started putting grommets every couple inches along the bottom to let the tubes drain. I also found lighter plastic tubing. It was probably cpvc. I know I made a couple with home made fiberglass tubes but the added strength was unnecessary and it was a waste of time.

 
Last edited by a moderator:
Thank you gentlemen, this fits with what I was hoping to hear (cheap, easy and workable).

Grommets for stopping water pooling - nice idea, easier for me than sewing in a patch of mesh or netting. As long as I can be sure grommets won't snag the lightweight spinnaker cloth?

I don't need to worry about the set-up storing damp because it will be removable, so I can turn the sailcloth chute inside out and hose off the salt.

I'm making a sort of bolt-on plywood platform about eight inches square, which will sit just to port of the genoa furler drum, and hold the mouth of the chute ahead of the forestay...

...I'm not proud of how it'll look, but its location should make it possible to drop the kite on either tack without fouling the forestay. Unless I haven't thought it through... :rolleyes:

 

knobblyoldjimbo

Super Anarchist
What about using beach cat tramp netting. Don't know how much it is but it'll let the water through. Also you could double the downhaul line like the Aus VS skiffs do. I used some ag pipe for a mouth once, worked ok ish.

 

PaulK

Super Anarchist
Am thinking about similar setup for my 505. The big new spinnaker has a hard time fitting in the old-sized spinnaker chute. Are there problems with lines coming from the deck level tangling in jibsheets and such? The original setup puts the downhaul line in the bilge where there don't seem to be as many lines flying around to snag.

 
...you could double the downhaul line like the Aus VS skiffs do.
This, I'm inferring, is in order to allow hauling down on either tack, even with the chute mounted behind the forestay?

But, if the spinn halyard must begin by hoisting the sail from a chute aft of the forestay, the halyard will hang down one or other side of it...

...and surely you can't hoist the spinnaker from behind the forestay for either tack, if the sail is emerging and rapidly filling while the halyard is on the windward side of the forestay? Won't there be a horrible foul-up?

I figured it was easier to mount the chute-mouth ahead of the forestay, so the sail always fills unobstructed, and can equally easily be hauled down again. But I may be quite wrong.

 
Thanks for that, JMOD...but prices like that will steer me clear of anything manufactured for purpose!

I don't just mean the 50K Dragon, I meant the £136 chute.

Pretty sure I know what I'll use, now. Photos here in due course if it works. :)

 




Top