onboard coffee??

IStream

Super Anarchist
10,795
2,976
Pour over coffee makers like the Melitta work best if you dampen the filter first, then put the grounds in and pour a couple of tablespoons of hot water on them. Allow about 45 seconds for the grounds to "bloom" and then start pouring water to brew. 

Personally I like pour over coffee better than French press, and a lot easier to clean up. 
I don't understand the "hard to clean up" knock on the French press. I pull the press out of the carafe and drop it in the sink while I dump the bulk of the grounds in the garbage or even just down the sink, rinse off the remaining grounds from the two parts, and set it out to dry. It doesn't need soap or even to be wiped with a sponge. Takes about 10 seconds.

A pour-over makes great coffee but only one cup at a time and you need filters.

 
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Moonduster

Super Anarchist
4,823
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The fact of the matter is that one cannot make even passable coffee at home or on board. The reason is that peak flavor comes between days 4 and 7 after roasting and deteriorates astonishingly quickly after that. The amount of money that's spent on home setups to grind beans that resemble rat shit is astonishing, but what comes out cannot pass for coffee by any measure.

And anyone who believes that Starbucks sells coffee needs to step back and give some thought to the fact that any mass marketer is limited by the average quality of the commodity on which their product is based. Estimates are that Starbucks purchases nearly 40 million kilos of beans per year and, as a result, their product is, at best, average. There's a reason they burn rather than roast - it's the only way they can get that dreadful consistency they claim as their hallmark.

Now that's not to say that you don't like what you produce - only that your claims are similar to those who say a pickup truck handles well.

 

DDW

Super Anarchist
6,321
1,012
The fact of the matter is that one cannot make even passable coffee at home or on board. The reason is that peak flavor comes between days 4 and 7 after roasting and deteriorates astonishingly quickly after that. The amount of money that's spent on home setups to grind beans that resemble rat shit is astonishing, but what comes out cannot pass for coffee by any measure.

And anyone who believes that Starbucks sells coffee needs to step back and give some thought to the fact that any mass marketer is limited by the average quality of the commodity on which their product is based. Estimates are that Starbucks purchases nearly 40 million kilos of beans per year and, as a result, their product is, at best, average. There's a reason they burn rather than roast - it's the only way they can get that dreadful consistency they claim as their hallmark.

Now that's not to say that you don't like what you produce - only that your claims are similar to those who say a pickup truck handles well.
So, let us assume the question was asked this way: "If you do not have a big enough boat to carry a coffee roaster  and trained operator on board, and want to cruise farther than 4 days away from a coffee plantation, how do you make a coffee substitute on board?" Would that make you happier?

I own both a 1 ton pickup and a Porsche. I am often asked which handles best. I tell them: with the cabover camper or 5000 lbs of machinery loaded in the back, the truck handles better, and it is absolutely true. Context does in fact matter. 

 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,701
3,275
El Colador and Cafe Bustelo, the Puerto Rican standard!





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Sock it to me!

 

Priscilla

Super Anarchist
4,236
2,825
The fact of the matter is that one cannot make even passable coffee at home or on board. The reason is that peak flavor comes between days 4 and 7 after roasting and deteriorates astonishingly quickly after that. The amount of money that's spent on home setups to grind beans that resemble rat shit is astonishing, but what comes out cannot pass for coffee by any measure.

And anyone who believes that Starbucks sells coffee needs to step back and give some thought to the fact that any mass marketer is limited by the average quality of the commodity on which their product is based. Estimates are that Starbucks purchases nearly 40 million kilos of beans per year and, as a result, their product is, at best, average. There's a reason they burn rather than roast - it's the only way they can get that dreadful consistency they claim as their hallmark.

Now that's not to say that you don't like what you produce - only that your claims are similar to those who say a pickup truck handles well.
Crikey Moon lighten up its the season for giving.

In the antipodes we brew and enjoy this.

https://nz.allpressespresso.com/roast-method-matters

4497758F-6DBA-4A0B-9325-908741479E48.jpeg

 

socalrider

Super Anarchist
1,348
698
San Diego CA
The fact of the matter is that one cannot make even passable coffee at home or on board. The reason is that peak flavor comes between days 4 and 7 after roasting and deteriorates astonishingly quickly after that. The amount of money that's spent on home setups to grind beans that resemble rat shit is astonishing, but what comes out cannot pass for coffee by any measure.
Next time someone calls me a coffee snob I’m going to point to this post. 

I certainly understand that optimal coffee is better than suboptimal coffee, but to say that all suboptimal coffee, from Nescafé to fresh ground single origin beans that were perfectly roasted (gasp) 10 days ago is equally shitty strains credulity. 

 
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Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,701
3,275
Espresso...

     The original fairing on the bottom of that little MORC boat had blistered badly within a couple of years of its being built due to the fact that it was a C-Flex hull with four layers of woven roving with no mat between the layers which was the standard practice at the time. They saved a lot of weight by eliminating the chopped strand mat and substituted milled glass fibers in the laminating resin. Problem was that the interstices between the coarse woven roving weave left little channels for water to penetrate. I think it was built at New Orleans Marine but they brought it to us at Seemann Composites to grind off the bottom and put a better barrier coat and refair. We didn't want the nasty clouds of grinding dust in the shop so hung it from an A-Frame in the little lot behind the shop backed up to one of the big NO coffee roasting factories. I think it was COMMUNITY coffee and they had a Chicory Blend that was popular with the locals. I didn't drink coffee when I started working in New Orleans but a few weeks of having a tidal wave of fresh coffee aroma come flooding over the back wall and into the shop at 9:30 like clockwork when the first shift first batch came out of the roaster and went into the grinding mill soon had me addicted. The next roaster/grinder cycle was right about lunchtime and then the last of the shift was right about 3:00 PM and was perfect for our shop breaks throughout the day. I bet you could take a core sample off of the EXPRESSO sloop and still find traces of coffee terpenes and volatiles or whatever to this day! Probably some CBD and THC in there too since that back lot was the 'Safety Session Breakroom' for the gang in our shop...

 

chester

Super Anarchist
6,147
1,297
Next time someone calls me a coffee snob I’m going to point to this post. 

I certainly understand that optimal coffee is better than suboptimal coffee, but to say that all suboptimal coffee, from Nescafé to fresh ground single origin beans that were perfectly roasted (gasp) 10 days ago is equally shitty strains credulity. 
surely moon duster was trolling...surely....

 

LeoV

Super Anarchist
12,294
3,485
The Netherlands
Makes good coffee. However the material it is made of does not take a thread well and if you use it a lot the thread fails and it is landfill. Over the years I have had 3 - none lasted.
Get a stainless steel one, they make them for induction, that is why I know;
https://www.bialetti.com/coffee/stovetop/stainless-pots-c-1_7_21.html?zenid=gok30uupovtr17ff05j8e6ert6

Funny to see Bialetti now does filter coffee too as a new trend :)
https://www.bialetti.com/coffee/pour-over-coffee-maker-c-1_135.html?zenid=gok30uupovtr17ff05j8e6ert6

 

crankcall

Super Anarchist
1,623
185
Toronto
I was MEC this morning looking at some very fancy lightweight presses and brewers, and drip sets , this is a very deep rabbit hole I'm headed down. 

I'm considering repurposing a corn popper with internal paddles that I could convert to a coffee roaster, being 50 miles from shore or 3 days from a roaster as Moonduster says will be very unsuitable. 

 

nebe

Member
127
43
RI
I swear by Starbucks via instant coffee on my boat. Heat up some water and pour it in a mug and dump in a stick of Via.... stir it a bit and presto.... Pretty damn good coffee. 

 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,701
3,275
It does beg the question: how did they determine that civet-shit coffee was good, the first time? Are there other civet-shit precedents? Never mind, I’ll Google it
Yeah, the guys that tried civet shit coffee the first time must be cousins with the first guy to try oysters.

Oyster-QA-IMG_4259.jpg


 
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