onboard coffee??

Veeger

Super Anarchist
I've been using water from the tank, filtered by my Seagull IV filter.  Still, back of the mind, I wonder whether I should use bottled water but I don't carry that much for coffee making and I have no issues drinking the filtered water straight.  Wish I had the Seagull filter at home, even the fridge filter doesn't 'do' enough to mitigate taste the way I'd like.  The tap water (home), is 'almost' undrinkable still in comparison however.

 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,701
3,275
    When I was running a cabinetshop for a big beach resort in the Islands, the locals drank more tea in the morning than coffee. I got into the habit because there was always a pot of hot water on the coffee maker next door at central receiving and those restaurant individually packaged teabags. A fresh brewed cup of tea was far better than the dregs from the institutional coffeepot and the locals often would leave a big bag of bush tea or fresh lemongrass to spice things up a bit. 

    I opened up shop early and headed next door and someone had just filled the teapot with water from a gallon plastic bottled water jug still sitting next to the machine. The hotel made RO water but it made lousy tea or coffee and there was always a case of distilled bottled water next to the coffee station. I picked a nice Black Pekoe bag and put in my mug and poured the steaming water from the pot over it. It looked strangely 'light' for black tea much like after one puts a heavy dose of lemon juice in it which sort of bleaches the dark color. I double checked my teabag wrapper to see if I had mistakenly used a lemon tea variety or Constant Comment which has a good dose of orange peel which lightens it.

    The locals usually drink their tea with milk but someone had left some nice local honey so I put a couple of healthy dollops in my tea and gave it a stir. The water was not fully heated due to my haste and I was able to take a big mouthful without burning and gulped it right down. All of a sudden my mouth and throat were burning intensely and not from the caloric heat of the tea! I spit what I hadn't swallowed out onto the concrete slab and the vile concoction made the concrete bubble and boil up! I poured some more from my cup on the slab and it was like ALKA SELTZER foaming up. I raided the little fridge and drank all the milk that was there hoping that milk would help neutralize whatever I had drank and went to the restroom to try and gag myself. The guy who had first put the pot on was pouring his tea when I got back. I warned him and told him what had happened to me and about them the guy who maintains the dozens of golf carts on the resort came in from the cafeteria. His workstation/bench was right next to the coffee and he looked over and noticed the gallon water jug that he kept his Battery Acid hygrometer (looks like a turkey baster) to top off the 6 volt batteries and it wasn't there. He picked up the gallon jug which the tea pot had been filled and looked at the label and pointed out his illegible attempt to write 'Battery Acid Do Not Use' over the printing on the label. The other guy said there were no fresh bottled water available and he had just looked around and spotted the Battery Acid bottle and used it unknowingly! The golf cart guy splashed some more on the floor and there was the answer to the 'Hot Tea' mystery. I was rushed to the new clinic up on the hill and took the bottle with me and had some ulceration in my mouth and back of my throat but the milk must have helped with what got to my stomach. It wasn't full strength acid in the bottle but had picked up some acid each time the mechanic had dipped his baster in the distilled water and it had a kick to it. 

    The hotel management wrote both those guys up for the sloppy handling of haz mat and I got teased at the cafeteria for a couple of weeks. A new OSHA approved container was added to the golf cart bench and that was the end of it. I did buy a little mini version of the battery tester/baster and started taking it with me to the coffee/tea station as well as the cafeteria and used it to stir my beverages after that aventure. The West Indians really appreciate a White Boy with a sense of humor!

Z-t8t_lcpEx_.JPG


 
    When I was running a cabinetshop for a big beach resort in the Islands, the locals drank more tea in the morning than coffee. I got into the habit because there was always a pot of hot water on the coffee maker next door at central receiving and those restaurant individually packaged teabags. A fresh brewed cup of tea was far better than the dregs from the institutional coffeepot and the locals often would leave a big bag of bush tea or fresh lemongrass to spice things up a bit. 

    I opened up shop early and headed next door and someone had just filled the teapot with water from a gallon plastic bottled water jug still sitting next to the machine. The hotel made RO water but it made lousy tea or coffee and there was always a case of distilled bottled water next to the coffee station. I picked a nice Black Pekoe bag and put in my mug and poured the steaming water from the pot over it. It looked strangely 'light' for black tea much like after one puts a heavy dose of lemon juice in it which sort of bleaches the dark color. I double checked my teabag wrapper to see if I had mistakenly used a lemon tea variety or Constant Comment which has a good dose of orange peel which lightens it.

    The locals usually drink their tea with milk but someone had left some nice local honey so I put a couple of healthy dollops in my tea and gave it a stir. The water was not fully heated due to my haste and I was able to take a big mouthful without burning and gulped it right down. All of a sudden my mouth and throat were burning intensely and not from the caloric heat of the tea! I spit what I hadn't swallowed out onto the concrete slab and the vile concoction made the concrete bubble and boil up! I poured some more from my cup on the slab and it was like ALKA SELTZER foaming up. I raided the little fridge and drank all the milk that was there hoping that milk would help neutralize whatever I had drank and went to the restroom to try and gag myself. The guy who had first put the pot on was pouring his tea when I got back. I warned him and told him what had happened to me and about them the guy who maintains the dozens of golf carts on the resort came in from the cafeteria. His workstation/bench was right next to the coffee and he looked over and noticed the gallon water jug that he kept his Battery Acid hygrometer (looks like a turkey baster) to top off the 6 volt batteries and it wasn't there. He picked up the gallon jug which the tea pot had been filled and looked at the label and pointed out his illegible attempt to write 'Battery Acid Do Not Use' over the printing on the label. The other guy said there were no fresh bottled water available and he had just looked around and spotted the Battery Acid bottle and used it unknowingly! The golf cart guy splashed some more on the floor and there was the answer to the 'Hot Tea' mystery. I was rushed to the new clinic up on the hill and took the bottle with me and had some ulceration in my mouth and back of my throat but the milk must have helped with what got to my stomach. It wasn't full strength acid in the bottle but had picked up some acid each time the mechanic had dipped his baster in the distilled water and it had a kick to it. 

    The hotel management wrote both those guys up for the sloppy handling of haz mat and I got teased at the cafeteria for a couple of weeks. A new OSHA approved container was added to the golf cart bench and that was the end of it. I did buy a little mini version of the battery tester/baster and started taking it with me to the coffee/tea station as well as the cafeteria and used it to stir my beverages after that aventure. The West Indians really appreciate a White Boy with a sense of humor!

Z-t8t_lcpEx_.JPG
Hell of a tale!

- Stumbling

 

Russell Brown

Super Anarchist
1,643
1,205
Port Townsend WA
Actually, I do fairly long singlehanded races on my boat and like I said, coffee is important. My boat is rather complex and can be a challenge to keep upright at times. Making coffee, let alone finding all the necessary things needed to make coffee has to be as simple as possible. I take ground coffee when racing and, like I said I use a Melita cone and filters, which is a whole lot easier than the Aeropress with it's tiny filters and multiple small parts. I cut a hole in the counter top that holds my small thermos, but it can still be a fun challenge to get the next batch of coffee made when its rough. I'm also a bit of a coffee snob, so the coffee has to be good, no matter how insane it is to try to make it.

 

Ishmael

Yes, we have no bananas
50,941
11,248
Fuctifino
Seriously?  If you think an Aeropress has TOO many moving parts, you should probably just not own a sailboat. What? 4 things to keep track of?  Fuck sake. Welcome to the kiddie pool. 
Russel was very kind to you. Now would be a good time to STFU.

 

Rantifarian

Rantifarian
Are these hand grinders quiet? I realize reading this thread that my love of coffee onboard has more to do with the peace and quiet of dawn.  We rarely wake up on the water, near a road or any typical 'home' sound.

And I'm the lone riser and coffee drinker so it is personal time (I share it, equally, with the dog). 

The sound of a machine - any machine - at dawn on the water, would be blasphemy, at least in my cockpit. 

They make a little noise, but it's a nice satisfying crunch rather than an electromechanical whirr. They are also quite quick if you are grinding coarse, it can take a while for fine grinds. 

 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,183
965
The Gorge
I only use bottled water in the Atomic. It has lower TDS and leaves less scale in the boiler. At home in the super automatic I use deionized water which has near zero solids. 
I’m thinking there is an inherent conflict between scale-free machinery and optimal extraction of coffee.  Deionized water makes crap coffee.  Decent extraction water makes scale. Those who would daily sacrifice themselves on the altar of Coffea must endure some toil and trouble.  

 
G

Guest

Guest
I bet you could chuck that into a Milwaukee right-angle drill and accomplish both. Might have to up the bean feed rate a bit.
Youre onto it, I got a hario grinder and an old electric drill and voila!

 

SemiSalt

Super Anarchist
7,752
269
WLIS
If forced into it, you can just add coffee grounds to a pot of boiling water and pour it through a paper towel into the cup.
I had a friend who brewed camp coffee this way, but instead of the paper towel filter, he added an egg to the pot. I'm not sure of the exact technique, but the egg is supposed to capture the grounds. He called it Swedish coffee. The filtering was inefficient, but the coffee was tasty.

My apologies to the Swedes.

 

monsoon

Super Anarchist
1,452
238
ELIS
Have used a Bodum SS french press for many years. Keeps the coffee nice and hot. Multiple cups.

How good the coffee tastes depends on what goes into it.  images.crateandbarrel.jpg

 

DDW

Super Anarchist
6,321
1,012
I’m thinking there is an inherent conflict between scale-free machinery and optimal extraction of coffee.  Deionized water makes crap coffee.  Decent extraction water makes scale. Those who would daily sacrifice themselves on the altar of Coffea must endure some toil and trouble.  
So, you carry your own coffee water, carefully selected for mineral content on board?

Yeah, we're getting into coffee snobbism here. Adding up the criteria so far: Stay within 4 days of a coffee producing region. Roast your own beans onboard. Grind them yourself: we know from prior posts by Moonduster that this requires a commercial grinder that will hold at least 2 kg of beans, the little hand held jobs are crap. Store a supply of carefully blended water with the right balance of the right minerals. Use only a boiler fed machine that will develop at least 14 bars pressure. You will need to add a large genset to power the roaster, grinder, and machine.

Others of us have a life. Personally I use instant coffee brewing water. Just add water, and it's ready to use. 

 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

Super Anarchist
5,987
1,578
Canada
Because I demand only the very best on-board coffee, I had to upgrade my boat to accommodate such critical equipment as climate-controlled coffee bean storage, commercial grinders (different grinders for different beans), and a restaurant-grade coffee bar/cafe espresso maker.  Anything else is simply not worth it and utter bullshit.  This is the only place it’s at for good coffee on-board.

My galley (see it and weep, little sailor boys!):

9313326C-30DD-47BF-A458-35C20289D120.jpeg

A5720117-1AA4-4C0F-AC72-036018C11137.jpeg

 
I had a friend who brewed camp coffee this way, but instead of the paper towel filter, he added an egg to the pot. I'm not sure of the exact technique, but the egg is supposed to capture the grounds. He called it Swedish coffee. The filtering was inefficient, but the coffee was tasty.

My apologies to the Swedes.
Most of the cowboy coffee I have consumed had egg shells added to the pot for grinds settling.  

As long as you were not late in getting your coffee ration, it worked.   Otherwise you get a little extra calcium supplement to chew with your eye-opener!

- Stumbling

 
https://www.cabelas.com/product/Cabelas-Stainless-Steel-Cool-Touch-Coffee-Pots/732498.uts?productVariantId=1635070&WT.tsrc=PPC&WT.mc_id=GoogleProductAds&WT.z_mc_id1=02426831&rid=20&ds_rl=1246525&ds_rl=1246528&ds_rl=1247879&ds_rl=1252079&gclid=EAIaIQobChMItaLdn52l3wIVmUsNCh2Yewf_EAQYASABEgJ73vD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

I got mine at Campmore years ago.  A percolator on the stove is hard to beat.  9 minutes of perking and it's done.  Maxwell House, Chock Full o' Nuts, Eight O'Clock when A&P was still around, etc.  I am not a coffee snob.  Ground coffee is fine.  I don't use special water, I don't grind beans.  

I don't use sugar or milk either.  That way when the cup has been sitting for hours I can take a drink and it is still good.

After reading this thread I used my girlfriend's French press earlier today.  I won't be using that again.  Heat the water in a pot or kettle.  Then the FP & wait 4 minutes.  Didn't save any time.  And the coffee was weak to boot.  

 

DDW

Super Anarchist
6,321
1,012
I use bottled water to keep the scale out of the machine. I'll love to do double blind taste tests with some of these snobs. When proper science enters the stage, often snobbism exits through the VOM. 

 
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