Over-boom spinnaker sheeting on a fractional rig

Marty Gingras

Mid-range Anarchist
While racing a Shields on a broad reach, we inadvertently got the spinnaker sheet on top of the boom. While there, the sheet rode naturally upwards of five feet higher and a few feet further outboard than it would have if it had been in the usual orientation under the boom. The open-leech, outboard-lead configuration seemed quite fast. In our neck of the woods, this approach is at least pretty darn rare and I don't recall seeing it before. The web doesn't say much about it, other than it's not recommended because it limits motion of the boom. Thoughts or observations about sheeting that way on purpose?
 

atnan

Member
140
69
Alameda, CA
We use an outgrabber on the Cal 40 for offshore racing. Just a snatch block on an adjustable lead off the end of the boom.

We usually run the lazy guy through it which becomes the active sheet on the primary winch, then cross sheet the sheet between the two aft secondary winches so you can banjo the sheet by hand to prevent the kite from collapsing when surfing down waves.

In addition to improving the sheeting angle, the other benefit is it acts as a preventer.
 

allweather

Member
419
82
baltic
Thoughts or observations about sheeting that way on purpose?
Not so great for sails as mentioned, though slippy sheets helps some and depends on how hard everything is driven too.

But a pretty standard sight in the H-boat class racing while reaching from a certain wind strength upwards because it's faster while sailing high. Which probably is a boat dependent but what it's there.

I don't know all the effects on the sails, not like a sailmaker could explain it, but for us the result is that the boat heels less and more power seems to go into driving the boat forward instead. It is faster.

Drawbacks are something you'll have to look at and weigh why you'd consider this sheeting style for some occasions or avoid it no matter the potential gains. For example my old sail has some chafe damage along the leech for about a meter right at the bottom. But that is hardly sawing through because of the oblique angle while reaching high enough where over boom sheeting becomes a thing on my boat. Some sail repair tape solved it for myself.
 

Tom O'Keefe

Super Anarchist
I seem to recall a rule that you can only control both clews of a spinnaker with 2 poles during a jibe. I think that was when outengrabbers went out of favor.
Regardless, it's all about the slot and air flow through. And, obviously boat type and sail construction have everything to do with whether it works or doesn't.
 

Jethrow

Super Anarchist
Here's a shot of a Soling in that configuration. With such a low boom it helps the spinnaker clew lift & twist better...
1663641424313.png
 

Plumbean

Member
290
38
I seem to recall a rule that you can only control both clews of a spinnaker with 2 poles during a jibe. I think that was when outengrabbers went out of favor.
Regardless, it's all about the slot and air flow through. And, obviously boat type and sail construction have everything to do with whether it works or doesn't.
50.3(b) expressly allows for an outgrabber
 




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