Paint technique

europa

Member
55
8
Vermont
I expect to finish building my Argie 15 as soon as the weather warms up enough to work in my barn. I realize there are three ways to paint it, and I’m looking for advice. I have built and varnished two wooden kayaks, and want a good looking finish on this as well. 
It sounds like roll and tip works best with two people, so probably out.
If I paint with a brush , I assume I will need to do a very good job of sanding between coats, which I’m used to doing. 
Buying a paint sprayer has some appeal, but I suspect it would take quite a bit of practice to get a good result. And so I would probably have to sand almost as much. 
Any advice or comments? 
Thanks

 

PaulK

Super Anarchist
We rolled our deck, cabin trunk and cabin top with short nap rollers and felt no need to tip afterwards.  Looked good both with non nonskid and nonskid areas.  The  napped rollers held up for entire days with Awlgrip, unlike the foam rollers. This saved us a lot of time, stress (waiting for the foam to disintegrate, because you know it will) and mess.  Rolling & tipping w/two people is faster, but if you're not worried about the foam disintegrating it will work with one, and just take longer.

 

Steam Flyer

Super Anarchist
40,021
7,585
Eastern NC
I have and use an electric sprayer, but for small jobs it's not worth the trouble it takes to set up and then to clean afterwards.

Rolling will work great. It will reduce sanding somewhat over brushing but the main difference is in time and thinning. You'll still need a brush to do the edges.

- DSK

 

europa

Member
55
8
Vermont
Thanks to both of you. Sounds like rolling , with some edging by brush, is a simple way to go. Is thinning required for rolling? If so, should my paint cans advise on the amount? John

 

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
12,829
2,537
Always thin precisely according to manufacturer. No general rule is sufficient. ( in the way old days it was different. Paint was a boatyard concoction. Modern paints are formulated to meet voc limits and handle differently than tradition)

 
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bluelaser2

Member
425
66
CLE
I've had better than expected results using single part poly (like Brightsides) with roll and tip - done solo.  On a 15 footer, you can cover enough area to keep a wet edge long enough to put down the roller, lightly tip, then drop the brush into bit of paint for the bristle tips (they need to stay wet the whole time, the roller can sit in the pan). 

The tip pass really does encourage a nice leveling and removes roller induced film thickness differences.   I don't suggest skipping it.  You should not need to sand much between coats- almost a light scuff is enough if your prep was smooth.  

Unless you have a booth, there is no percentage in spraying and with spraying, the prep and gun have to be perfect and you will end up having to do more coats and messing around with thinning, which is hardly ever worth the trouble in normal painting humidity and temp.
 

I like using a very standard paint and color so future repairs are easy.     Good luck! 

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
8,871
4,781
Canada
For something small like a kayak or dinghy a single person can easily roll and tip. I did a 40' catamaran hulls by myself.

Use Interlux Perfection for longest lasting, most durable results. Brightsides is a good second choice if you can store it out of the sun 

 

PaulK

Super Anarchist
We tried Brightsides on our deck in a trial.  It lasted about a week before the wear & tear of actual use made it shabby, gouged, and scratched.  Topsides on a Blue Jay was OK, until it bumped the dock anywhere. 

 

allweather

Member
392
76
baltic
Use Interlux Perfection for longest lasting, most durable results.
I want to not use gelcoat for a part out of a female mould, but also would like to avoid having to paint after the fact.
My research in that regard, using urethane paint or the like in the mould, isn't going well. Would you know some keywords to look into to read up?

 

Steam Flyer

Super Anarchist
40,021
7,585
Eastern NC
Always thin precisely according to manufacturer. No general rule is sufficient. ( in the way old days it was different. Paint was a boatyard concoction. Modern paints are formulated to meet voc limits and handle differently than tradition)
This.

Don't mix-n-match thinners/solvents, either. I tried to clean a brush with the wrong solvent a couple of years ago, and it curdled the paint right in place. I suppose there was some interesting chemistry going on, but I was more PO'd than studious. I used to use gasoline as a brush/roller cleaner (and yes, as a former Navy fuel boss and firefighter I follow rigid precautions) because it was cheaper and easy to dispose of. Ah, the good ol' days.

- DSK

 

WillyT123

Member
120
52
Alexseal supposedly doesn't require tipping. Keep in mind this guy accepted a deal with Alexseal at some point after this video was made. 




 

JimC

Not actually an anarchist.
8,099
961
South East England
After considerable experience over the years I finally concluded that the best way to paint my boats was to get some other ******* to do it.

 

Dex Sawash

Demi Anarchrist
2,408
659
NC USA
After considerable experience over the years I finally concluded that the best way to paint my boats was to get some other ******* to do it.
I like other people to get new paint on their boat however they want. I'll let mine bash the dock unattended while I run to the head and admire their finish when I make it back.

 

Steam Flyer

Super Anarchist
40,021
7,585
Eastern NC
I like other people to get new paint on their boat however they want. I'll let mine bash the dock unattended while I run to the head and admire their finish when I make it back.
^ For the win ^

Because after all, when you're out sailing, you can look at their beautiful boat and they are looking at yours... ha ha!

- DSK

 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
4,976
774
worldwide
I expect to finish building my Argie 15 as soon as the weather warms up enough to work in my barn. I realize there are three ways to paint it, and I’m looking for advice. I have built and varnished two wooden kayaks, and want a good looking finish on this as well. 
It sounds like roll and tip works best with two people, so probably out.
If I paint with a brush , I assume I will need to do a very good job of sanding between coats, which I’m used to doing. 
Buying a paint sprayer has some appeal, but I suspect it would take quite a bit of practice to get a good result. And so I would probably have to sand almost as much. 
Any advice or comments? 
Thanks
Roll and tip is a single handed job ..perhaps 3  coats over primer with a light sand between coats  

dark colors are difficult …stick with light colors 

spray is a nightmare for a home shop …don’t go there 

 

dburchfiel

Member
384
124
Raleigh, NC
I used Alexseal.  They have an additive that eliminates tipping.  Unlike some others I've used it is easy to keep a wet edge.  There was a holiday that I noticed 20 minutes after rolling it.  I rolled out the holiday and the next day I couldn't tell where it had been it leveled so well!

There was some dust and roller fuzz in it so I sanded it with an orbital sander and 2000 grit paper.  I kept the surface just wet with a spray bottle. Took about an hour to do the whole boat followed by 3000 then buffed with 3m rubbing compound. Half a day for everything.

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